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Full text of "Annual report of the municipal officers of the town of Deering, Maine"

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in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/annualreportofmuOOdeer 



ALLEN COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01880 4762 



GC 

974.102 
P837DAR, 
1890-1891 




ANNUAL REPORT 




OF THE 



| Municipal ® Officers.. J 



OF THE 



TOWN OF DEERi'NG, 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending February 12th, 1890. I 






PORTLAND : 

Harris & Williams, Printers. 

1890. 



^iiuiimiuniiiiiiiiiiiiuiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiiMiuiiiniHiiiiiiiiiiiniiiiiiiiiHiiiiiHiiiiiiiMiniiiiiiiiiniiiuiniMiuiii^iv: 



19th ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



Municipal * Officers 



OF THE 



TOWN OF DEERING, 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending February 12th, 1890. 



PORTLAND : 

Harris & Williams, Printers. 

1890. 



Report of Selectmen, Assessors and 
Overseers of Poor. 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Deering : 

We herewith submit our Report, with statements of receipts and 
expenditures for the year ending Feb. 12th, 1890. 

ROADS, BRIDGES AND SIDEWALKS. 

The appropriation for roads and bridges was $9,000, but owing to 
the small appropriation last year and the unusually bad fall for 
roads, and the heavy rains the present year, we have been obliged 
to overrun the appropriation to keep the roads passable. 

The road from Woodford's to Deering Bridge is worn out and in 
a very bad condition, but it would be a useless waste of money to 
expend any large amount on it until a grade is established so that 
the work can be done permanently. 

CAPISIC BRIDGE. 

The appropriation for building over the abutment of Capisic 
Bridge was two hundred dollars. The bridge has been repaired 
and put in a safe condition for travel with the money raised for the 
purpose. 

NEW STREET— FROM HIGH STREET TO PLAINS ROAD. 

The appropriation for building the new street from High street 
to'the Plains road f was three hundred dollars, which was not consid- 
ered enough to pay for the building the whole length. We have 
built from High street in as far as there are any houses, and from 
the Plains road up to the residence of T. M. Goudy, leaving about 
five hundred and sixty feet to be built to connect the two parts al- 
ready built, about three hundred feet of which is solid ledge. It 
will require an appropriation of at least eight hundred dollars to 
complete the street. 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 



STONE CRUSHER. 



The stone crusher has been removed and set up at Brighton Cor- 
ner, as per vote of the town at the last annual meeting. We have 
leased a piece of land from Geo.Libby, adjoining the town house lot, 
at an annual rental of twenty dollars per year for five years. The 
cost of setting up the crusher and engine, and putting it in con- 
dition to run, was $577.59. The amount received for the use of the 
crusher for 1888 was 1335.00, which was applied to the setting up 
of the same, leaving a balance against the town of $242.59, for 
which there was no appropriation. 

TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. 

The appropriation for grading the road in front of the town 
House shows a balance on the debit side, which, from the nature of 
the work to be done, was unavoidable. Three thousand dollars was 
the lowest estimate made by men familiar with that kind of blast- 
ing, for doing the work contemplated when the appropriation was 
made. The work was commenced on the part where the deepest 
cut would have to be made, and after getting but a very short dis- 
tance a very hard vein of ledge was encountered, which made the 
progress slow and the expense correspondingly large. The deepest 
cut was four and one half feet, and in order to leave the road in a 
passable condition it was necessary to cut through the crest of the 
hill to where the ground commenced to decline. Three hundred 
yards or more of the rocks taken out have been used for crushing 
and other purposes, and there still remains on the lot back of 
the Town House, ready for use when wanted, at a very low esti- 
mate, three hundred dollars worth. The most expensive part of 
the grading is done, and there should be an appropriation made to 
continue the work. The rocks are near the crusher, and a large 
part of them are of the very best material for road purposes. 

HOSE HOUSES AND CARRIAGES. 

At a special town meeting, held April 12th, 1889, one thousand 
dollars were raised to build hose houses and purchase hose carts or 
wagons for the thickly settled portions of the town, and Mr. J. H. 
Hutchins was appointed to act with the Selectmen in locating the 
same. In compliance with this vote we have caused to be built five 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 5 

houses as follows : One on the high school house lot at Deering 
Centre, one on the school house lot at Allen's Corner, one at East 
Deering on land of L. W. Dyer, one on the school house lot at 
Libby's Corner, and one at Stroudvvater on land of Andrew Hawes. 
We have also finished a room in the horse railroad car house at 
Morrill's Corner, Mr. E. A. Newman, General Manager for the 
company, very generously offering the room rent free to the town. 
We have placed a wagon at Morrill's Corner with 550 feet of hose 
in it ready for use ; also wagons at Libby's Corner and Stroudwater 
with 500 feet of hose in each. Hose carts have been placed at East 
Deering with 500 feet, Allen's Corner with 450 feet and Deering 
Centre with 250 feet, and the hose taken from barns and sheds and 
placed on the reels ready for use in case of fire. The appropria- 
tion was $1,000. We have expended $999.11. Balance 89 cents. 

OUT DOOR POOR. 

By reference to the out door poor account it will be seen that the 
bills are not as large as in past years. In 1887 the amount expend- 
ed was $2,751.05 ; in 1888, $2,343.65, and in 1889 we have expend- 
ed $l,154.(3(i. The appropriation and receipts were $1,006.40, leav- 
ing a balance against the town of $61.64. There is due from the 
towns of Westbrook and Windham more than enough to balance the 
account. 

ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 

The expenditures at the alms house have, been in excess of the 
appropriations, owing partly to the fact that we have exchanged 
the old horses for a younger and better pair, and have been obliged 
to buy a new mowing machine, hay tedder and other farming tools. 
We have also been obliged to spend quite an amount in repairs on 
the old house to make it habitable. The house is in a very bad 
condition ; the sills are rotten and the roof is leaky. As more 
room has been needed, sheds have been built on from time to time, 
and a more inconvenient and uncomfortable building for the pur- 
pose could hardly be conceived of. The town should, for its credit 
if nothing more, either build a new alms house or sell the farm and 
buy a house that is suitable for the purpose. 

The largest number of inmates in the house at any one time was 



6 REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 

eleven, the smallest seven, average nine. There are ten at present. 
There have been three deaths — George Sawyer died May 3d,William 
G. Waters (colored) died Oct. 8th ; both were buried on the town 
of Deering Stranger's Lot, in Evergreen Cemetery ; Mary Lenham 
died Jan. 28th, 1890, and was buried by relatives in Forest City 
Cemetery. 

We have changed keepers and think that the change will prove 
for the advantage of the town. We hope that under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Irish and wife the farm account will show better next 
year. 

TOWN OF DEERING STRANGER'S LOT. 

It was voted at the last annual meeting to enlarge the Town of 
Deering Stranger's Lot and pay for it out of the contingent fund. 
We[have bargained for six more numbers to the lot, making twelve 
numbers in all, and have nearly graded it, but will not finish it un- 
til spring, and then the town can pay and have a deed of it. The 
six new numbers will cost $125, $150 for perpetual care, about $25 
for turfing and grading ; making some two hundred dollars when 
complete. There are eleven bodies already buried on the lot. 

The town team hauled the filling. 

SEWERAGE. 

Article 27 of the Warrant for the last annual meeting was — "To 
see what action the town will take on the report of the Selectmen 
on petition of George JC. Sawyer and others, in relation to sewerage 
for Fessenden street, referred to them at the last annual town meet- 
ing." 

The town voted to refer said article to the Selectmen for them to 
act as the law allows. 

In compliance with this vote, the Selectmen gave notice of a 
hearing on petition of George E. Sawyer and others, and met, and 
after looking over the location petitioned for and hearing interested 
parties, laid out a sewer, beginning at the westerly end of Fessen- 
den street and running through said Fessenden street to Forest 
avenue, thence through said Forest avenue to an outfall at Deering 
bridge. 

At a special town meeting, held April 12th, 1889, it was voted to 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 7 

accept the sewer as laid out by the Selectmen, and on motion of 
George C. Hopkins the Selectmen and Treasurer were authorized to 
negotiate bonds of the town to the amount of seven thousand dol- 
lars for the construction of said sewer, upon such terms of years 
and upon such interest as they may deem best for the town. 

On motion of L. B. Chapman a committee of four, consisting of 
L. B. Chapman, John H. Read, George E. Sawyer and J. S. Ricker 
was appointed by the Moderator to act with the Selectmen in the 
construction of the sewer. 

On May 20th, 1889, the Sewer Committee met at the Selectmen's 
office and organized, and on motion of L. B. Chapman it was voted 
to ask an opinion of N. & H. B. Cleaves in relation to the legality 
of the Deering Sewer Act of 1880. 

At a meeting of the Sewer Committee held May 25th, the opinion 
of N. & H. B. Cleaves was read, stating that sewers could be le- 
gally built under the Act of 1880. 

On motion it was voted to proceed with the construction of the 
sewer as laid out by the Selectmen and accepted by the town ; all 
voted in favor except Messrs. Chapman and Read. 

On motion of Mr. L. B. Chapman it was voted, that de- 
tailed specifications be prepared in accordance with the plans pre- 
pared by Messrs. llsley & Cummings, and adopted by the town at 
the last annual town meeting, for the cost of the sewer for which 
appropriation was made at the special town meeting held April 12th, 
1889, and in accordance with the above vote the specifications were 
procured. 

With the unanimous consent of the committee, Mr. Chapman 
read a petition for a town meeting, which was afterwards called at 
town house, and the whole matter contained in the Warrant was re- 
ferred to the Survey Committee for them to report on at an ad- 
journed meeting which was held at Lewis hall. 

' Colonel Moore, Chairman of the Committee on Survey, reported 
for the committee, and read an opinion of N. & H. B. Cleaves that 
none of the Articles in the Warrant would have any binding force 
if acted on. 

An objection had been raised to making the outfall at Deering 
bridge on account of quicksands at Deering Point. 

The Survey Committee reported that they had caused borings to 



8 BEPORT OF SELECTMEN. 

be made to determine to what extent quicksand existed, and that 
the result of their investigations led them to the Opinion that a por- 
tion of the sewer, from Bedford street, so called, to Deering's 
bridge, be discontinued, and a new outfall be laid out between the 
north-east line of Bedford street, so called, and the Elias Hersey 
house, and they were instructed to take the necessary measures to 
have their recommendations carried out. When Deering bridge 
was determined as the outfall for the sewer, a Government channel 
was projected 50 feet wide, 12 feet deep, at low water, up to the 
bridge. 

Before we had got ready to commence operations, the Govern- 
ment discontinued the 50 foot channel, which would interfere with 
our outfall and might cause the town some trouble in the future. 

As matters had become somewhat complicated, and so many dif- 
ferent opinions, expressed b}^ engineers and others, we thought it 
advisable^ to call in a specialist to examine the whole sewerage 
scheme and make a report. 

Mr. J. Herbert Shedd, of Providence, R. I., was employed and 
came here, and with Mr. Cummings, the engineer who made the 
plans, went over and carefully examined the whole territory em- 
braced in the scheme, and following is Mr. Shedd's partial report: 

Providence, August 5, 1889. 

Mr. Luther Bradford, Chairman of Selectmen,, 

Town of JJeeriiHj, Me. 

Dear Sir : — I have carefully considered the problem of sewerage 
in Deering. 

First : As to what shall be discharged through the system. 

The liquid household wastes should certainly be so discharged. 

I am satisfied that the excess of ground water should also be so 
discharged, in order that the cellars and the grounds about dwell- 
ings may be so dried as to be in a healthful condition. 

It is very desirable, on many accouuts, that a certain amount of 
clean rain water should be admitted to the sewers, and the only im- 
portant reason for excluding it is the increased cost arising from the 
increased size required. This, however, need not be relatively a 
large item. As a practical matter it has been found nearly, or quite, 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 9 

impossible to keep out all the rain water from a sewerage system, 
and I think in your case it will be a much more judicious plan to 
provide for a considerable amount of roof water and a limited 
amount of rain water from other objectionable sources. In the sug- 
gestions of sizes, etc., which I shall make to you, I have assumed 
that you will admit such rain water as above mentioned. 

The ordinary storm water of the streets and land surfaces may, 
in this case I think, be properly excluded and provisions be other- 
wise made, as circumstances require, for its disposal. I have as- 
sumed in the following suggestions that such will be your policy. 

Second : As to the outfall. 

For nearly all the present populated part of Deering the deep 
water of the Government ship channel seems to be the best place 
for discharging the sewage, temporarily at least, and all that now 
much needs drainage can be discharged at a single point. I have 
considered its discharge at Deering's bridge. If delivered at this 
point the sewage will still have to run something over five hundred 
feet to reach the ship channel. Its track would be through the out- 
let of a valley which must always have a passage kept open for the 
discharge of its storm waters. Naturally the rainfall of about live 
hundred and fifty acres finds vent here, and a channel for the dis- 
charge of excessive storms would need to be about nine feet diame- 
ter, circular, if all is to come this way. Possibly some may be 
artificially turned the other way, into Fore river, and thus the re- 
quired channel may be smaller, but in any event the discharge of 
the sewage of the town into the outlet of this valley will.be much 
more objectionable than its direct discharge into the deep water of 
the ship channel on account, largely, of the comparatively small 
amount of dry weather Mow compared with the size of the channel. 

At a point on Forest avenue, about one hundred feet southerly 
from Deering street, a private lane runs easterly nearly in line with 
the middle of the ship channel. This furnishes what seems to me 
the most desirable route for the discharge of the sewage of the town. 
From this point on Forest avenue the distance through the lane; to 
the ship channel is about the same as the distance on Forest avenue 
to Deering's bridge, and sewage which would have to now say live 
hundred and twenty feet through the lane to reach the channel 
would have to How about twelve hundred and sixty feet to reach the 



10 KEPORT OF SELECTMEN. 

same point by the way of Deering's bridge. Unless there is some 
controlling objection which has not come to my knowledge I recom- 
mend that the outfall be ran from Forest avenue to the ship channel 
about in the line of this lane. I am informed that soundings in For- 
est avenue disclose the existence of quicksand opposite Deering 
street. This will, of course, somewhat increase the cost of laying 
a sewer, but it is not an uncommon thing to meet this sand in such 
work, and if properly managed it is not a very serious objection to 
any proposed location. It is said also that similar sand has been 
found while dredging in the ship channel, and it is not improbable 
that it exists generally about the neighborhood. Very likely any 
other route for an outfall, which would be feasible on other grounds, 
would be found to have quicksand on the line. This objection is 
not one which would deter me from selecting the route for an out- 
fall which I have above suggested. 

Third: As to the necessary depth for the sewers. 

If the sewers were to carry roof water, or other clean rain water 
only, they could be very shallow so long as they were beyond injury 
by frost. To carry household refuse they would need to be a little 
deeper to accommodate all buildings and give a proper fall in the 
private drains, even if water closets, sinks and laundry tubs were 
excluded from the basements of buildings. But such exclusion is 
not always practicable, and sometimes the value of ail increased 
depth to the sewer is greater for a single building than the cost of 
deepening a long line of street main. In your case a still greater 
depth is needed, I think, to provide for the thorough drainage of 
ground water below all cellars and foundations. As the grades of 
your streets are, unfortunately, not generally established, it is a lit- 
tle difficult to fix upon a proper grade for a sewer in a given street. 
All figures defining grades for sewers should be given to the inside 
crown of the sewer, as that is the limit of efficient drainage, and 
sewers of larger sizes should have their crowns at a proper grade to 
receive the How of the lateral sewers without backing it above the 
crowns of those laterals. The red lines on the profiles I received 
from you seem to me to give generally very good grades for the in- 
side crowns of the proposed sewers, and for Forest avenue to Fes- 
senden street, and through Fessenden street, I approve of their 
adoption. From Deering street to the ship charm el the sewer may 



BEPORT OF SELECTMEN. 11 

be laid on a falling grade of two feet per hundred. The blue line 
shown on the profile of Forest avenue seems to me unnecessarily 
deep; it may have been intended for an invert grade. 

As a general guide I suggest, that the sewers be laid about eight 
feet deep to the crown. 

Foujrth : As to material of construction. 

For all sizes under and including twelve inches in diameter I 
recommend the use of salt-glazed, vitrified, clay pipe. For sizes of 
fifteen to eighteen inches in diameter the local character of the 
earth and other conditions, like the need of keeping the street free 
for travel, etc., should determine between the use of pipe and brick 
sewers. For sizes over eighteen inches in diameter I recommend 
the elliptical form of section, of 1 to 1£, and single ring brick laid 
in hydraulic cement mortar. 

Fifth : As to sizes. 

The sizes will be mainly determined by the quantity of sewage to 
be discharged, according to the suggestions under the heading 
" First," and the grades at which the sewers are laid. But it is well 
to establish a minimum size for street sewers to be followed except 
in rare cases. So far as simple capacity is concerned a pipe of six 
inches, or even four inches, diameter, would convey all the sewage 
it is intended to supply to them in many of the streets in the town, 
but small pipes have proved in practice to be very liable to stoppage 
and the damage done by this is much greater than the cost of a 
larger size. It is also uncertain what buildings using great quanti- 
ties of water may be located, in the future, on a given street, and 
it is good policy to have the short laterals of extra large size until 
they reach the general system of piping where the average of many 
buildings will not be much affected by the large discharge from one 
or two. I have used six inch sewers in public streets with reason- 
able satisfaction, but I do not think it will be good policy for you 
to lay a less size than eight inch except in rare cases. I therefore 
recommend that as a general rule your minimum size of street 
sewer be eight inches in diameter. 

As to details of construction through the town, I shall need to 
make further study of local conditions. But I have sufficiently 
considered the whole scheme to enable me to advise you in regard 



12 REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 

to the main line of sewer on Forest avenue from Fessenden street 
to the outlet, and to the lateral sewer on Fessenden street. 

I propose that the main be an oval, single ring, brick sewer 20x30, 
with the inside grade at 9.50 at Deering street. From thence to 
deep water the sewer to be laid on a falling grade of two feet jDer 
hundred. From Deering street northerly the sewer to be laid on a 
rising grade of about 0.511 per 100 to station 17., to grade 15.00. 
Thence to Fessenden street the grade to rise about 1.001 per 100 to 
grade 23.60. 

On Fessenden street I propose that the size be 8 inches diameter. 
The grade of inside crown to be 23.60 at Forest avenue; 30.00 at 
Station 11.25; 43.50 at the proposed street crossing between Sta- 
tions 6 and 7, and 40.90 at station 1. 

A manhole should be constructed at the summit on Fessenden 
street, at Station I, through which a liberal (lush of water could be 
supplied to the sewer. A manhole should also be constructed at 
every change of line or grade. All junctions, and curves at junc- 
tions, should be made within a manhole. 

I make this partial and preliminary report so that the least prac- 
ticable amount of delay may be had in your work proposed to be 
undertaken this season. 

Yours respectfull}'-, 

J. HERBEBT SHEDD, 

Civil Engineer . 

Before Mr. Shedd had completed his examination the Sewer Com- 
mittee called for the plans, and they were returned mid are now in 
the hands of llsley & Cummiiigs, for them to look over and see 
what changes are necessary to be made to comply with Mr. Shedd's 
recommendations. 

The Committee on Survey was delayed until it was too late to 
take any action or commence operations before another spring. 

We are having the same experience as all other towns in starting 
a system of sewerage, but it is hoped that the people will at an 
early day take hold of the matter in earnest, and make a. start on a 
sewerage system, which is very much needed in the thickly settled 
portions of the town. 



ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

At the last annual meeting a committee was appointed to confer 
with the Westbrook Electric Light Co. in relation to furnishing 
lights for Forest avenue. 

At an adjourned meeting the committee reported that the Com- 
pany offered to furnish twenty-five lights for one hundred dollars 
each per year, on a five year contract. It was stated by the com- 
mittee that, in their opinion , a trade could be made with the Com- 
pany to furnish twenty lights at the same rate per light on a three 
years' contract. It was voted to instruct the Selectmen to contract 
for twenty lights for three years at $2,000 per year, and a commit- 
tee was appointed to act with the Selectmen in locating the lights. 
The committee was called together and the locations fixed upon, 
and the Company notified of the vote of the town. After learning 
the length of the circuit the Company declined to make the con- 
tract, but offered to put in twenty-four lights on a three year con- 
tract at the same rate per light. After consulting all the members 
of the committee, and with their advice and consent, the Selectmen 
submitted the proposition to make the contract for twenty lights, 
as per vote of the town, and in addition to contract for four extra 
lights until the next annual meeting ; which was accepted, and the 
twenty-four lights were put in and the light turned on the night of 
Oct. 10th. It remains with the town as to whether the four extra 
lights are continued after the next annual meeting or not. 

Mr. W. K. Dana, the manager of the Company, has spared 
neither labor or expense in his efforts to give the town good service 
for the money. 



K.EPOBT OF SELECTMEN. 13 

TAXES ASSESSED, 1889. 

For State Tax $7,122 70 

County Tax 2,760 00 

Roads and Bridges 9,000 00 

balance Old Account. 1,000 00 

Support of Schools (& .Jftfil . * J A tft} 6 r 600-00; 

Interest and Balance 1888 Account <*$;|}&QW L 07$i) 

Repairs on School Houses ^OOsO^. "br^-A^ 

Discount on Taxes 1 5 000 00 \1 * ., ' 

Alms House and Farm, ($400 00 for Deficiency 1877-8) 1,000 00 ijj'. . 

Town Officers 2,000 00 

Snow Bills and Deficiency 1888 Account 1,000 00 

Out Door Poor and Balance 1888 Account 1,800 00 

Commissions and Abatements 600 00 

to Balance Old Account 1,200 00 

High School .'. / 2,000 00 

Portland Water Co., as per contract 2,700 00 

Incidentals 1,500 00 

Engine at Woodford's 100 00 

Burying Ground and Balance Old Account * 100 00 

Board of Health " " " " 600 00 

Street Sprinkling 300 00 

Rackleft" Street 300 00 

Electric Lights. 2,000 00 

Town House Ledge 1,000 00 

Capisic Bridge 200 00 

Hose Houses and Carriages 1,000 00 

$52,882 70 

Overlay 1,761 82 

Supplementary Tax 18 60 



Total Tax $54,663 12 

VALUATION, 1889. 

Real Estate, Resident $1,800,180 00 

Personal Estate, Resident 412,690 00 

Real Estate, Non-Resident 586,750 00 

Personal Estate, N on-Resident 19,020 00 

Supplementary 700 00 



Total Valuation $2,819,340 00 

Tax on Real and Personal Estate at $1.80 on $100. . $50,735 52 

" " " " Supplementary.. 12 60 

" 1,303 Polls at $3.00 each 3,909 00 

11 2 Supplementary Polls at $3.00 each 6 00 



$5 4,'663 12 



14 



BEPOBT OF SELECTMEN. 



We recommend the following amounts for the ensuing year 



Roads and Bridges, and balance, 

Support of Schools and School Books, 

Interest, 

Repairs on School Houses, 

Repairs on School Houses, deficiency 1887-'89, 

Discount on Taxes, """" ' 



V" 



Alms House and Farm, and balance, -JW 

Town Officers, 

Snow Bills, 

Out Door Poor, ,-.—,,,., 

Commissions and Abatements, 

High School, .^ 

Portland Water Co., as per contract, 

Incidentals, 

Engine House at Woodfords, 

Sprinkling Streets, Deering Bridge to M. C. Station, m 

Board of Health, ; ; - 

Electric Lights, v 

LUTHER BRADFORD, 
ADAM W. WILSON, 
EDWARD L. COBB, 



$10,000 00 

j,,.. 8,800 00 

5,500 00 

t ..... 800 00 

Vx-^B00 00 

1,200 00 

,/OS? 'njr$ ^ooo-oo 

/£# 50000 
j J y i 1,000 oo 






V^oOO 00 
2,000 00 
£,700-00 
1,500 00 
100 00 
300 00 
.,400-00" 
2,000 00 

Selectmen 

of 
Deering. 






ffa ' '''■- 



kA 



vC 



■ 






ALMS HOUSE AFD FARM. 15 

Dr. ALMS HOUSE AND FAKM. Ob. 

To amount expended, $2,940 51 By appropriation, $1,000 00 

Balance 1887 acc't, 444 42 Receipts, 760 18 

Balance 1888 acc't, 7 34 Balance, 1,632 09 



$3,392 27 $3,392 27 

To balance, 1,632 09 

Allen, H. J., medicine » '. $ 6 00 

Brown, W. C. Mrs., use of team 1 00 

Boston & Maine Railroad, Freight 25 

Burnell, C. 'E., supplies 86 35 

Bragdon, W. H., labor, » 6 00 

Brown, G. W., medical attendance 1 50 

Brown, G. E., supplies 11 52 

Brown, John, labor 1 00 

Brooks, Edward S., express 1 90 

Corey, J. A., attending funeral 5 00 

Currier, Martin Jr., labor and material 36 40 

Coffin, J. H. & Co., insurance 30 00 

Casco Tanning Co., manure 45 00 

Chipman, O. G., watching sick 2 25 

Currin, Mary, labor 11 85 

Campbell, Annis, labor 8 25 

Dana & Co., salt 1 40 

Davis, Roscoe S., furniture 75 31 

Doten, S. H. & A. R., lumber 20 82 

Eastman Bros. & Bancroft, supplies 96 49 

Everett, Edward, labor 1 00 

Foss, T. F. & Son, furniture 30 20 

Fickett, J. B. , paint 4 35 

Frye, John J., tools, &c 47 75 

Griffin, John, haying 7 00 

Grant, Nellie J., labor in house 25 00 

Grant, G. B., haying 57 25 

Grant, G. B., care Geo. Sawyer 2 00 

Gustin, Hiram, hens 20 00 

Hill, A. F., clothing 1 45 

Holden, C. F. & Co., clothing 54 30 

Herrick, E. E., supplies 12 69 

Hawes, Andrew, grain 214 05 

Irish, Wm. H., manure 23 00 

Jones, C. H. & Co., labor and material 10 00 

Johnson, F. H., coal 75 95 

Kendall & "Whitney, supplies 122 07 



16 ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 

King & Dexter, supplies 30 88 

Kelley, Daniel T., tools 30 10 

Kimball, E. L., blankets 3 00 

Leavitt, Geo. B., superphosphate 32 40 

Libby, Milton, paid sundry bills 7 52 

Libby, Milton, paid funeral services 5 00 

Libby, Milton and wife, keepers 325 72 

Libby, C. E., labor on farm 10 00 

Libby, E. L. Mrs., labor in house 128 00 

Lucas, William, lumber for fMoring 30 00 

Legrow bros., lumber 46 46 

Leehan, Dennis, haying 16 00 

Leighton, Royal, supplies 4 76 

Manise, George, tripe 64 

Murray Bros., pair horses 375 00 

Moore, Myron E., labor and material 10 20 

McArthur, Wm., fish 5 69 

Marrett, A. W., vinegar 2 00 

Owen & Moore, supplies 94 

Peck & Son, painting 12 61 

Parker, C. T., haying 6 00 

Parker, A. M., medical attendance 22 50 

Patron Co-operative Co 10 42 

Stan wood, E. L. & Co. paints and medicines 55 25 

Small, J. T., carpentering 42 90 

Sawyer, J. L., repairing tools ; 11 25 

Small, John T 6 43 

Schlotterbeck & Foss, medicine 43 75 

Schwartz, J. C, riling saws 85 

True, D. W. & Co., supplies 307 96 

Turner, J. W., boots and shoes 25 80 

Todd, Wm. F., clock 3 50 

Varney, Otis, manure 2 50 

Walton, Jere., difference in cows 15 00 

Winslow & Co., pipe 28 

2,887 66 

Webb, H. B., labor and material, 1887 52 85 



Amount expended $2,940 51 



BOARD OF HEALTH, ETOo 



17 



Dr. 



BOARD OF HEALTH. 



To bal. from old acct., '88, $530 56 
amt. expended, . 189 48 



By appropriation, 
balance, 



$720 04 
To balance, $120 04 

Pierce, J. G. medical attendance, Joseph Pelton 
Sherwood, G. P. Secretary 



Or. 

$600 00 
120 04 

$720 04 



$8 75 
180 73 



$189 48 



Dr. BURYING GROUNDS. Cr. 

To amt. expended, $95 40 By appropriation, $100 00 

balance of 1888, 33 

balance, 4 27 

$100 00 $100 00 

By balance, $4 27 

Bailey, Elbridge G. labor '. , $ -6 00 

Fickett, Walter, supplies 5 62 

Fickett, Charles, labor 29 50 

Hay, H. H. & Son, supplies , 10 86 

Kelsey, J. T. carpentry 12 85 

Johnson, E. G. . . . .- 5 63 

LeGrow Bros 5 44 

Smith, A. D 19 50 

$95 40 



Dr. COMMISSIONS AND ABATEMENTS. 


Cr. 


To balance 1888 acct., $ 840 60 


By appropriation, 


$ 600 00 


amt. expended, 3,781 64 


R. R. and Tel. tax, 


1,541 06 


balance, 162 11 


Overlays for 1887, 


118 52 




Supplementary for 


'87, 191 79 




Overlay for 1888, 


444 94 




Supplementary for 


'88, 107 62 




Overlay for 1889, 


1,761 82 




Supplementary for 


'89, 18 60 


$4784 35 




$4,784 35 



By balance, $162 11 

Chenery, D. D. abatement for 1877 $ 3 25 

1878 15 54 

" " 1880 38 72 



18 CAPISIO BBIDGE, ETC. 

Chenery, D. D. abatements f orJ1881 83 33 

!882 21325 

Jacobs, Elias M. " 1883 19 66 ' 

Matthews, Fred V. commission 1888 100 00 

bal. of 1888 18569 

1889 50000 

bal. of 1889 2 00 00 

" " abatements, 1889 584 65 

" • " " 1888 46676 

1888 3622 

Webb, H. B. abatements for 1886 - 352 19 

1887 454 91 

" " commissions, 1886 240 17 

<« " 1887..... 287 40 

$3,781 64 



p R> CAPISIC BRIDGE. Ob. 

To amt. expended, $149 48 By appropriation, $200 00 

. Town House l'ge, rocks, 50 52 

$200 00 $200 00 

John Bell, derrick $10 75 

Wm. Fielding, labor 2 00 

L.B. Smith, " 15 00 

C. E. Bide, " • 22 00 

Thos. J. Johnson, " 1 50 

C.E.rride, " 2143 

Pat. Eeeney, " t 6 00 

R.S. Stimson, " 12 00 

A.P. Cotton, " 2500 

IraNason, " ■■• 6 00 

Stewart Worster " 27 80 

$149 48 



D R . DISCOUNT OK TAXES. Cb. 

To disc't allowed, 1889, $1,287 94 By approp'n and bal., $1,000 00 

balance, ^ 66 balance 1888 acct., 363 60 

$1,363 60 $1,363 60 

By balance, $75 66 



ENGINE HOUSE, WOODFOKDS, ETC. 19 

Dr. ENGINE HOUSE, WOODEORDS. Cr. 

To amt. expended, $86 58 By appropriation, $100 00 

balance 1888 acct., 25 25 balance, 11 83 

$11183 $111 83 

To balance, $11 83 

Eldredge, L. G. care of engine house $ 68 00 

Peck & Son, paint and oil 6 08 

Webb, H. B. labor and material, 1887 . 12 50 

$86 58 



Dr. 


ELECTKIC LIGHTS. 


Cr. 


To amount expended, 


$ 600 00 


By appropriation, 


$2,000 00 


balance, 


1,400 00 
$2,000 00 








$2,000 00 






By balance, 


$1,400 00 


Westbrook Electric Light Co., one > 


quarter as per contract. . . 


....$ 600 00 


Dr. 


EIRE PROOF VAULT. 


Cr. 


To amount expended, 


$ 4 00 


By balance of 1888, 


$1911 


balance, 


15 11 








$19 11 


$19 11 






By balance, 


$15 11 


Brackett, J. L. boxes. . 






$4 00 



Dr! HIGH SCHOOL. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2,278 25 By appropriation, $2,000 00 

balance 1887 acc't, 38 96 balance from 1888 acc't, 403 48 

balance, 461 27 balance from State, '88, 125 00 

balance from State, '89, 250 00 

$2,778 48 $2,778 48 

By balance, $46127 

Clark Memorial Church, use of $ 20 00 

Chenery, H. L., diplomas 7 00 

Clark, W. H. & Co., wood .' 3 25 

Crosby, E. H. teaching 455 19 



20 HOSE HOUSES AND CARRIAGES, ETC. 

Davis, E. W., teaching, and supplies 694 51 

Harris & Williams, printing 15 00 

Hooper, Son & Leighton, book case * 30 00 

Merrill, OJark 33 50 

Montgomery, C. W 330 00 

Pierce, 0. W., janitor 67 00 

Paine, Kate, sweeping 16 50 

Smith, L. A. Mrs. cleaning • 9 49 

Stevens & Jones, supplies 12 60 

Webster, H. J., teaching 449 99 

Warren, D. S., coal ' 122 22 

Ward, T. J., wood 12 00 



$2,278 25 



Dr. HOSE HOUSES AND CARRIAGES.I Cr. 

To amount expended, $999 11 By appropriation, $1,000 00 

balance, 89 

$1,000 00 ... ' $1,000 00 

By balance 89 

Barnes, H. K., three hose carts — '. $ 128 50 

Barbour, J. & E. R., supplies 2 95 

Jeiferds, Granville, extra trimming of wagon ,.;...;,........ 8 00 

Legrow Bros., lumber 31 46 

Lane, Burnham & Co., building hose houses 519 50 

Plummer, W. L., lettering wagon *jf 20 

Portland Steam Packet Co., freight on carts , . •. . 1 50 

Scanlon, John, building three wagons 300 00 

$999 11 



Dr. INCID. 

To amount expended, $1,383 85 
balance fm .'88 acc't 629 38 

balance of Lewis Hall 
• 1887 acc't, 18 89 



$2,032 12 



To balance, $442 12 



xs. 


Cr. 


appropriation, 


$1,500 00 


rec'pts circus license, 


60 00 


rec'ptssale of old safe, 


10 00 


rec'pts rent Presump- 




scot Grange, 


20 00 


balance, 


442 12 




$2,032112 



INCIDENTALS. |. 21 

Allerf, W. A. street signs $ 11 25 

Bennett, H. B. key checks. 1 50 

Bradford, Luther, expenses to Boston '. 6 75 

Burnell, Ferdinand, recording deaths, &c. , .- : 42 19 

Bailey, Geo. H. constable 1886-'87 73 00 

Bailey, F. E. painting street signs 18 75 

Berry, C. R. constable and truant officer 10 00 

Clark, L. M. supplies and constable 7 65 

Cobb, Edward L. expense to Boston 5 00 

Chapman, Henry, est. tax refunded 2 16 

Chapman, L. B. expenses to Augusta 1888 10 00 

Cotton, A. P. constable .' ' .. 4 00 

Cobb, G. H. " i 4 00 

Chenery, D. D. notifying meeting 24 00 

Duran, Job R. Maine Register 1 60 

Elder, I, L. expense on Green case 35 00 

Evergreen Cemetery, burial of bodies 9 00 

Eastern Argus, printing tax deeds ■. 40 00 

Express Publishing Co. advertising 1 50 

Gilpatrick, use horse and carriage 3 50 

Huston, A. R. postage, &c 22 53 

Hutchins, J. H. expense to Augusta 1888 5 00 

Harris & Williams, printing 1888 161 00 

Hawes, Andrews, services as auditor 1888, &c 10 50 

Irish, Fred E. sweeping 1 50 

Jordan, E, C. surveying . . . 30 00 

Johnson, F. H. coal at office 3 20 

King & Dexter, hardware ... 11 12 

Knight, S. S. recording rec'd tax deeds 25 00 

Kenney, Freeman, use of water . . 48 00 

Knowles, O. L. moving safe 5 00 

Lunt, J. R. & Co. tax refunded 3 60 

Libby, Geo. drawing lease 3 00 

Legrow Bros, lumber 24 14 

Loring, Short & Harmon, supplies 3 60 

Matthews, Fred V. proving claims 1 00 

Matthews, Fred V. taking polls and militia 105 00 

Marston, G. L. constable. 24 00 

McLellan, Mosher & Co. check book . 1 00 

Odell, R. K. office chair 9 75 

Pride, Charles F. labor on burying lot 11 25 

Pierce, John G. vaccination and med. attend, to Glines family — 30 25 

Perry, F. L. printing ! 28.90 

Pride, Chas. E. labor on stranger lot 22 50 

Portland Water Co. repairing drinking fountain 4 80 

Reed, D. H. gravel for stranger's lot. 21 30 



22 



OUT DOOR POOR, 



Southworth Bros, printing 31 50 

Shaw, Lewis, building fires 2 00 

Stevens, Frank G. shipping and mortgage list 30 00 

Stevens & Jones, valuation books, &c 76 90 

Small, John T. labor and material office 33 55 

Smith, J. W. constable . . : 4 00 

Small, Httel, copying. . . 8 50 

Woodbury, C. A. moderator v — 15 00 

White, George, tax refunded 4 00 

Wilson, A. W. telegraphing and postage 2 75 

Wilson,. A. W. expenses to Boston 4 60 

West, W. G. copies water contract 2 50 

$1,142 99 
OLD BILLS, 1887. 

Chase A. J. expenses to Augusta . 4 75 

Webb, H. B. taxing polls, scholars, militia and dogs, and notify- 
ing meeting, &c , . 236 11 

Total amount expended .$1,383 85 



Pe. out dook pooh. 

To amount expended, $1,154 66 By appropriation, 

balance 1887racc't, 13 38 rec'd W. F. Seal est., 

rec'd from Windham, 

Lowell child, 
rec'd from Minot, W. 

P. Berry, 
balance, 

$1,168 04 

To balance, $61 64 ,. 

Michael Stevens, rent Barbasky family, 1888 $ 25 00 

Andrew Hawes, " " " ;.,., 27 50 

D. H. Hamilton, board Bickford boy 

Maine Insane Hospital, board Mary H. Briggs, 

A. M. Parker, medical attendance, F. M. Buckley 

Martin W. Best, rent W. P. Berry 83 30 

F. II. Johnson, coal, • " 5 00 

Fred Whyly, supplies, " 3 00 

Fred Boucher, horse hire, pauper case 



Cr. 

$913 97 
5129 



60 50 

80 64 
6164 

$1,168 04 



$52 50 
56 55 

52'24 

15 00 



9130 
2 00 



OUT DOOR POOR. 23 

Luther Bradford, expense on pauper case. 5 25 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies Mrs. J. E. Coffee 73 16 

J. G. Pierce, med. attend, " " 15 00 

Y. H. Soule, milk " '\ 14 77 

Mrs. M. Mann, nursing " ". 5 00 

Mrs. F. Sawyer " " " 28 32 

. Mrs. Jane Stray ton, washing, " " ...... 4 75 

F. H. Johnson, coal, " " io 50 

151 50 

'Mrs. E. C. Thorpe, board Cassandra Cram ... 65 00 

Mrs. E. Gould, care of Betsy Darling l 00 

E. W. Foster, med. at. " " 15 00 

Schlotterbeck & Foss, medicine Betsy Darling 55 

16 55 

C. W. Foster, Med. attend. Mrs. Fields 25 00 

J. E. Purington, supplies Mrs. Green 13 01 

F. H. Johnson, coal " ' " 20 60 

Royal Leighton, supplies " " 5 37 

. ; 38 08 

F. H. Johnson, coal Mrs. Hinckley 7 40 

A, F. Mann, rent '* " 15 00 

Mrs. J. Foxton, rent Mrs. Lang (family of ten). . . 46 75 

Mrs. Ann Kenny, rent " 8 25 

J, K. Winslow, " " 600 

Ed. Gould, " " :. 15 00 

J. E. Purinton, supplies " 65 34 

F. H. Johnson, coal " = 12 00 

E. J. Hersey, rent Mrs. Lunt. 77 00 

F. H. Johnson, coal " 20 25 

Fred Whyly, supplies " , 48 83 

Schlotterbeck & Foss, medicine — 11 50 

Maine Insane Hospital, board Louisa S. Marriner 

C. W. Foster, medical attendance Mrs. Metcalf. 

T. B. Richards, supplies Penn Family 

Schlotterbeck & Foss, medicine Kate Paine 

J. F, Blake, rent Jabez Stevens' family 21 00 

City of Portland, med. attend. Jabez Stevens' family. . . 36 30 

Andrew Hawes, supplies Hannah Walker 

Amount expended , $1,154 66 



22 40 



153 34 



157 58 


150 14 


10 00 


13 31 


2 80 


57 30 


15 92 



24 PITT STREET SCHOOL HOUSE, ETC. 

Dr. PITT STREET SCHOOL HOUSE. ' Or. 

To amount expended, $22 00 By balance 1888, $13 28 

balance, 8 72 



$22 00 $22 00 

To balance, $8 72 



Dr. 

To amount expended, 
balance, 


PLTJMMER HILL. 

$ 7 50 By balance 1888 acc't, 
13 50 


Or. 

$2100 



$2100 $21 00 

By balance, $13 50 

Campbell, Edward, labor. . . $4 50 

Jones, A. C. labor 3 00 



$7 50 



Dr. PORTLAND WATER CO. . ; Or. 

To am't expended as per By appropriation, ' $2,700 00 

contract, $2,650 00 balance 1888, : 358 26 
balance, 408 26 

$3,058 26 . $3,058 26 

By balance, . $'408 26 



Dr. RACKLEFE STREET. Cr. 

To amount expended, $34132' By appropriation, $300 00 

balance, ■ 3 43 sale of rocks, 44 75 

$344 75 - $344 75 

By balance, $3 43 

Bragdon, W. H. labor $ 3 00 

Chandler, Geo. W, " '. 7 50 

Cotton, A. P. ; ' : .... *.... 176 

Goiidy, A. H. " 19 50 

Hollis, R. D. jr. " 12 00 

Hollis, R. D. " 4 00 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



25 



Herrick, C. F. labor, 28 60 

Higgins, Alex. " . . . 10 13 

Hudson, Geo. H. " : 7 50 

Lucas, William, " 6 00 

Libby, Sumner, " . 4 31 

McCann, D. B. " 6 75 

McCarty, John, " ' 37 50 

Rowe, R, F. " ... 12 00 

Stimson, R. S. " : . ; . .' 39 00 

Wescott, F. L. blasting 150 88 

$341 32 



Dr. 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



Ob. 



To amt. expended, $9,013 53 

trans, from Frost Cul- 
vert acct.-, . 4 22 



$9,917 75 

To balance, $755 62. 

Aver, Edward labor, $ 9 98 

Abbott, Amos " ,,, 352 00 

Batchelder, Henry labor 31 50 

Bailey, Edward " 20 48 

Buck, W. S. " 10 50 

Britt, Edward " 3 00 

Britt, Daniel " 1 50 

Bailey, E. G. " 19 50 

Blake, James " 13 12 

Boice, Mannis " 186 38 

Bailey, W. B. " 124 48 

Boucher, Fred "■ 116 60 

Berlin Mills, lumber,' ' 28 40 

Bragdon, W. H. labor, 103 88 

Berry, 0. R. "■• 22 25 

Berry, George S, " 99 25 

Blake, W. L. supplies, 2 25 
Bell, John stone for cr'swks, 19 65 

Bailey, George W. labor, 7 50 

Boothby, W. D. "• 95 41 

Bell, Samuel «' *-..'■ 4 75 

Broad, Ami estate, " , 5 00 

Berry, W. S. ..." 67 58 
Blackstone & Smith, lab. mat. 19 37 

Blake, John labor, 35 00 

Brown, James " 2 25 

Barbaskey, 0. A. " 1 50 

Cobb, J. F. labor. 9 00 

Cotton, A. P. " ' 119 79 



By appropriation, $9,000 00 

balance from 1888 ac, 141 51 
balance from new st. ac, 20 62 
balance, 755 62 



.' 1 ' > 


$9,917 75 


Oribb, Thos. C. labor, 


85 00 


Chesley, A. A. " 
Cobb, G. H. 


14 50 


149 37 


Coffee, J. E. 


30 00 


Carter, Elmer " 


16 50 


Cobb, E. L. 


4175 


Castle, Richard " 


3 75 


Campbell, A. S. " 


9 00 


Cooney, Samuel " 


12 00 


Curran, Charles " 


3 75 


Chipman, O. G. " 


34 25 


Chase & Son, oil, 


1 60 


Conery, James labor, 
Coffin, B.-F.. 


12 98 


3 00 


Casco Cement Pipe Co., 


86 48 


Cobb, Charles 


15 00 


Carter, F. 0. 


27 75 


Cobb, C. H. 


1 50 


Desmond, Frank labor, 


16 00 


Dole, W.T-I. H. 


49 50 


Dunlap, A. S. 


3 75 


Dresser, Wm. 


10 50 


Dole, Daniel jr. 
Deering,Winslow '& Co., 


80 73 


lum. 50 89 


Davis, II. H. labor, 


19 25 


Davis, C. H. " 


34 50 


Douglass, K". O. " 
D. v. I. Association, sti 


12 00 


me, 12 25 


Elder, Wm. labor, 


9 98 



26 



ROADS AHD BRIDGES. 



Eldridge, L. G. labor, 

Elwell, W. S. 

Elder, Isaiah 

Ficketfc, Charles " 

Feeney, Patrick " 

Fielding, Wm. 

Farnham, Chas. S. gravel, 

Fickett, Walter, labor, 

Files, T. S. " 

Flynn, Patrick 

Goudy, A. H. 

Glines, Charles " 

Gulliver, Stephen " • 

Goudy, T. M. " 

Griffin, Martin 

Goddard, Calvin material, 

Herrick, E. E. labor, 

Huston, Eli K. 

Hollis, R. D. jr. 

Hollis, R. D. 

Hopkins, D. S. 

Hodgdon,C.H. stone cr'swks 78 00 

Harmon, A. S. labor, 

Hawes, Charles " 

Hawes, Andrew " &mat. 

Hughes, J. H. " 

Hawkes, B. S. 

Hawkes, Robert C. "■ 

Hunt, Albert 

Hunt, Henry '■'■ 

Hawes, Jos. estate," 

Hodgkins, C. R. 



Hamblet, Melville bricks/87 16 16 

Herrick, C. F. labor, 

Higgins, Alex. 

Hopkins, Henry W." 

Hill, Owen B. 

Hunt, David " 1884, 

Harmon, E. T. 

Heifron, Michael " 

Harris, W. W. 

Hoegg, D. VV. nails, 

Hunt, H. J. labor, 

Irish, Fred " 

Irving, John M. " 

Johnson, H. M. " 

Johnson, George " 

Jones, David 

Jordan, Mark 

Jones, Caroliue " 

Jacobs, George B. " 

Jones, A. C. gravel & labor 

Jewett, Samuel labor, 

Johnson, F. H. coal to eng., 

Knight, C. L. labor, 

Knowles, O. L. 

Kimball, Henry *.' 

Knight, Isaac " 



12 .00 Knowles, J. S. labor, 

3 15 King & Dexter, supplies, 

36 04 Kendall & Whitney, " 

15 75 Kelley, Daniel T. 
103 00 Keith, T. labor, 
164 00 Logue, Alex. 

26 00 Leigh ton, J. H. 
7 65 Libby, F. E. R> 

23 50 Libby, Sumner, " 

3 00 Lowery, Martin " 

267 23 Logue, Edward 

6 98 Logue, Edward P. " 

9 63 Leighton, A. H. " 

6 75 LeGrow Bros., lumber, ' 

2 00 Leighton. Geo. F. labor, 

1 50 Lowell, Abner 
2100 Libby, George gravel, 
77 15 Lucas, Wm. labor, 
38 62 Leighton, Geo. W. " 

203 50 Ladner, J. 1ST. ■ " 

11 63 Lucas, James " 

Littlefleld, Wm. E. " 
Leighton, A. " 

Leighton, Royal supplies, 
Maxfleld, Horatio gravel, 
MeCarty, John labor, 
Mosely, James 
Mahdley, Frank " 
Mitchell, Charles point to 

road machine, 
Mitchell, C. M. labor, 
Milliken, F. F. 
Mayberry, A. 
22 50 Mayberry, Daniel " 

3 00 Murphy, John 
3 00 Mounttort, F. P. " 

16 65 McCaiierty, Thos. " 
3 00 Morgan, John 

7 50 McCann, D. B. 
100 Milliken, H. F. 

43 20 Meader, B. W. 

10 McDonald, Jas. P. V 

2 93 Mosher, Clinton " 
48 00 Morgan, Patrick *' 
31 13 M. C. R. Road, freight, 

27 75 Milliken, Arthur labor, 
18 42 Motley, J. L. 
87 87 Nason, Ira 
22 50 jSTason, Stephen " 
43 50 Osgood, Frank 

75 O'Connor, Michael " 

, 63 31 0'Donnell,Thos. jr. " 

75 75 O' Donnell, Thos. " 

16 59 Portland Sreet Sprinkling- 

lie 75 Co., ashes, 

299 00 Pride, C. F. labor, 

9 75 Pride, C. E. 

7 12 Portland, use of roller, 1888, 



150 
28 50' 
41 24 

6 25 
40 00 
38 90 

6 00 
12 00 
44 00 
19 50 



1437 


20 00 


5 54 


8 10 


3 00 


4 50 


55 50 


5 00 


114 50 


13 73 


50 63 


4 50 


74 00 


520 76 


7 50 


12 30 


4150 


40 00 


2 04 


3 50 


22 75 


8 00 


2 25 


18 19 


5174 


183 00 


17 25 


7 50 


8 25 


20 25 


15 00 


158 00 


109 50 


23 62 


87 00 


38 26 


13 50 


40 50 


45 00 


2 50 


12 75 


16 00 


6150 


8 00 


26 70 


14 00 


10 00 


46 00 


4 13 


19 88 


4 88 


4 50 


337 25 


121 45 


54 00 


10 00 



SCHOOL HOUSE KEPAIRS. 



27 



Qualey, Thomas labor, 


145 60 


Read, John H. 


*« 


116 00 


Read, Daniel H. 


"&grav 


395 03 


ftandall, A. P. 


n 


5 25 


Read, B. A. 


" . 


48 75 


Robinson, E. C. 


<< 


99 00 


Rowe, R. F. 


(< 


44 00 


Rickett. Henry 
Richardson, A. L. 


" 


75 


(« 


18 25 


Read, Amos 


a 


3 00 


Richardson, J. S. 


" 


19 00 


Sawyer, M. D. 


" 


96 00 


Scribner, Clarence 


it 


6 00 


Smith, L. B. 


" 


123 43 


Smith, J. W. 


" 


179 75 


Stimson, R. S. 


<( 


132 50 


Sldllin, L. B. 


it . 


5 25 


Sawyer, John S. 


n 


20 25 


Strayton, Chas. H. 


(i 


15 75 


Small, W. H. 


" 1887, 


4 50 


« ■ << 


" 1889, 


29 25 


Sands, C. F. 


" 1888. 


17 63 


Shaw, Lewis 


" 


80 25 


Sawyer, Joseph E. 


" 


36 25 



Scanlan, John labor, 26 00 

Swett, Richard C. " 57 00 

Somers, J. B> " 26 49 

Starbird, Edward " 7 00 

Traftoh, J. E, • " 70 00 

Thurlow, Henry- " 12 00 

Thurlow, Cyrus est. " 16 00 

Tibbetts, Rufus " 1887, 18 00 

Thomes, E. M. " 141 69 

Van tassel, Chas. " 12 75 

Worster, Stewart " 242 00 
Wilson, A. W. " & grav 155 75 

Webb, H. B. tools, 1877, ' 5 00 
Waite & Adams, sup., '86-'87, 26 34 

Wescott, E. L. labor, 5 00 

Ward, J. E. " 7 50 

Waterhouse, Fred " 4 50 

Ward, T. J. ' " 33 02 

Wilson, Henry est. " 17 25 

Wiswell, Henry " 11 25 

Winslow & Co., pipe & tile, 30 89 

$9,913 53 



Dr. ■ SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS. 

To amount expended, $1,08116 By appropriation, 

balance old ace' t, 
balance, 



Or. 

$ 500 00 
450 91 
130 25 



$1,08116 .-.■-..• ■/'' $1,08116 

To balance, $130 25 

Adams, Elmer, labor and material • .$ 5 10 

Berry, C. R. " '■• 4 00 

Bailey, F. E. painting and glazing • 101 11 

Burnnam, L. B. labor. . *..'.' '. .'• • ■ * 00 

Blackstone & Smith, mason work 144 76 

Blanchard, C. H. labor and material * 3 75 

Campbell, Robert, k ' " .: • - 125 

Elwell, W. S. " " - 100 

Higgins, A. W. labor. : : • 14 90 

Hamblet, Melville, bricks. 42 00 

Johnson, E. G ■ • ■ • - • • 9 96 

Johnson, Thos. J. cleaning • 9 00 

Jones, C. H. & Co. labor and material 38 62 

Johnson, H. K. labor and material • 12 83 

Jones, A. C. gravel i « 20 42 

King & Dexter, hardware VI 41 



28 SCHOOL HOUSE RBPAIES, ETO. 

Legrow Bros, lumber — ... 154 79 

Morgan, Patrick 3*80 

Marston, G. L. labor. 2 10 

Merrill, 0. W. • " 5 30 

Plumnier & Wheeler, labor and material •..'...'. 14 93 

Peck & Son, painting 30 00 

Ross, Joseph j 8 15 

Read, J. N*. carpenter work. ........ 201 77 

Ross, J. M. whitening. . . . , '. . .... ........ .,. . . 2 00 

Rumery, Lauriston, labor. . ....... 7 50 

Scott, Wm. H. labor and material : . . . 43 28 

Small, John T. »' . " -. 134 22 

Starbird, E. D. labor. ; ,' 7 00 

Seal, Geo. P. " ...:.• 2194 

Thomes, E. M. " . ;... 1150 

Winslow, Howard, labor. ".': 2 30 

Winslow, J. T s lOfOO 

Webb, H. B : . , 3 38 

Amount expended $1,081 16 



Dr. SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, 1887. ' Cr. 

To bal. Riverside sch. h'se, $48 40 
amount expended, 586 55 

$634 95 

Webb, H. B. pipiag r school house for water $ 385 66 

" labor and material .... ; [.•..-. 188 24 

••• ');.. 12 65 

f 586 55 



Dr. SEWER SURVEY. ■ Cr. 

To amount expended, $546 00 By appropriation, 1888, $1,000 00 

balance, 454 00 

$1,00000 $1,000 00 

By balance, . $454 00 

Ilsley & Cummings, surveying ..$ 500 00 

Dockendoff, Walter, boring .'...-." 46 00 

$546 00 



SNOW BILLS. 29 



Dr. SNOW BILLS. Cr. 

To amount expended, $195 42 By appropriation, $ 06 18 

balance, 09 24 

$195 42 • - $19*5 42 

To balance, $99 24 

Bailey, E.J $ 75 

Berry, George S. 1888 3 50 

Blake, John H. 1888 2 62 

Cobb, G. H. labor 3 00 

Conrod, Edward W ; 3 00 

Castle, Bichard ; 1 50 

Dole, Daniel jr., 1888 5 25 

Elder, Isaiah. 4 30 

Elynn, Patrick. 7 10 00 

Grant, Gilman B . . . 3 00 

Gfoudy, Thomas M 2 25 

Hill, E. P 1125 

Hanscqmb, Humphrey .-. ;. 75 

Hunt, David 2 55 

Hamblet, Melville, 1887 70 50 

Knight, C. L I , 4 00 

Leighton, A . . *. 3 00 

Leighton, A. S. 1888. 1 50 

Leighton, Andrew H. 1888. .'. 5 25 

Libby, Frank, 1888. ' 75 

Leighton, William, 1886. ; .2 25 

Lowell, Abner, 1888. . . . . , 1 05 

Milliken, C. J...... 6 00 

Mountfort, Ered P .' 5 85 

Marston, G. L. ,../.. 1 50 

Noyes, James M. 1887 5 25 

JSToyes, George, 1888 .\ ■ 1 50 

Parker, Horace 3 75 

Bolfe, Lemuel, 1887 ; .v. ..... 11 55 

Skillin, L. B 6 00 

Stevens, John F 1 60 

Welch, John, 1887. :..... 6 00 

Wilson, A. W. 1888 4 50 

$195 42 



30 STOFE CRTT&HEE, ETC. 

Dr. STONE CEUSHEE. Cr. 

To amount expended, $577 59 By receipts from use of 

crusher 1888, $335 00 

balance, - 242 59 

* $577 59 $577 59 

To balance, - $242 59 

' Blackstone & Smith, mason work $ 89 25 

Hawkes, E. C. ox team 15 75 

Jones & Hitchings, machinist 261 37 

Libby, Sumner, stone — ... .. — . .... , 19 75 

Lane, Burnham & Co. carpenter work 173 25 

Phenix, J. C. pattern 17 72 

Parker, James, hogshead 50 

$57759 



Dr. STEEJET SPEINKLING. Cr. 

To amount expended, $300 00 By appropriation, $300 00 



Dr. SUPPOET OE SCHOOLS, 1889. Cr. 

To amount expended, $8,66299 By appropriation, $6,600 00 

balance fm 1888 acc'tj • 184 31 school fund and mill 

tax 1888, 2,472 17 

balance, 2,835 86 school fund and mill 

tax 1889, 2,610 99 

$11,683 16 $11,683 16 

By balance, . . $2,835 86 

Anderson, Lucy S. teaching $ 396 00 

Adams, E. E. janitor and sweeping. 23 00 

Bailey & ISToyes, shades 1 50 

Boynton, E. H. clock 1 25 

Bennett, H. M. janitor 11 50 

Byrne, E. J. teaching ; 67 20 

Berry, C. E. janitor ■ 56 00 

Blocklinger, Ered. janitor 12 35 

Chase, H. L. teaching 207 00 

Cheney, J. D. turdng piano 00 

Chenery, W. 1ST. janitor. .' 33 65 

Chase, M. M. teaching. 88 00 

Chubbuck, S. L. ' ' 396 38 



STTPPOBT OF '• SCHOOL'S". 31 

Cobb, Lizzie B. teaching 275 00 

Doudy, Mrs. J. H. sweeping 18 75 

Dole, John, janitor 70 40 

Dyer, E. J. teaching 88 00 

Davis, Roscoe G. shades 4 00 

Edwards & Walker, supplies 6 26 

Edwards, M. A. chart 3 50 

Edgar, Mrs. James, care school house ; . . . 63 00 

Elder, Myra. L. teaching 207 00 

Elwell, M. A. " 330 00 

Elder, Hattie V. " 297 00 

Emerson, E. W. janitor 11 00 

Elder, M. E. teaching '. ' 330 00 

Fitz, C, E. " , 144 00 

Goddard, Lucy, J. " , 26*4 00 

Hunt, Annie V. " , . ^ 153 00 

Hale^ Jane E. " • — 104 00 

Hull, B. C. sweeping ■. ,- . 2 00 

Hopkinson, F. E. teaching 88 00 

Hawkes, Hiram C. " 16666 

Hawes, Andrew, coal and oil '. 6 43 

Jones, 0. H. & Co. supplies . . , 21 00 

Jordan, J. B. labor. : . . . 6 00 

JohnsOn, F. H. coal and wood ' 20 75 

Jordan, Isabel, teaching 264 00 

Kendall & Whitney, dusters and floor brushes. . 4 20 

Kimball, E. L. teaching . — ....;.... 176 00 

Kimball, Susie P. " 176 00 

Knight, Bertha A. " 139 00 

Knight, F. H, janitor.. 20 50 

King & Dexter. 50 

Loring, Prentiss, supplies . . — 12 00 

Loring, Hattie J. teaching .... 241 00 

Leland, B. W. " 283 00 

McCarty, John, grading 412 

Morrill, E. N. teaching. . . . '. 88 00 

Maxfleld, E. F. " 264 00 

Morgan, Patrick, moving ashes and cleaning vault. 3 75 

Meserve, George, labor 4 00 

Merrill, Leonard F. janitor ., . 69 02 

McDonald, Michael, cleaning 3 00 

Morrill, F. H. janitor. 24 00 

Morrill, Mary S. teaching 45 00 

Milliken, F. F. janitor 35 04 

Millett, George, cleaning 4 00 

McCarty, Kate, sweeping 39 50 



32 TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. 

Marston, G. L. janitor. . .' 10 00 

Morrison, Kellie L. teaching 199 00 

Merrill, Thomas & Co. supplies 2 25 

Merrill, Clark, janitor, &c 144 00 

]STeilson, N. H 22 00 

Packard, Samuel II. washing school house , 1 00 

Paine, Kate, sweeping > 8 50 

Pike, C. H. wood •. 2 76 

Pierce, Clarence W. janitor : 66 00 

Purrinton, J. E. supplies 57 

Rumery, Lauriston 3 00 

Read, Grace, teaching 302 60 

Rice, C. M. & Co. supplies 1 50 

Ricker, Samuel, cleaning vault 4 00 

Rice, Jos. L. weighing coal 60 

Ross, Joseph, janitor 66 00 

Stevens & Jones, supplies 102 54 

Southworth Bros, printing . . . . . 1 60 

Sawyer, J. S. janitor '. 66 45 

Sawyer, J. E. cleaning cellar - ... 1 00 

Starbird, Scott R. janitor ; 34 00 

Starbird, E. D ■. 325 

Stockwell, A. P. teaching 154 00 

Stimson, R. S. labor — ......' 13 25 

Sullivan & Osgood, broom . 30 

Thomes, E. M. cleaning . : - 6 00 

Yan Horn, C. E. teaching 198 30 

Whittier, M. E. teaching and janitor — .' '.■■ 305 25 

Westwood, Wm. & Co. wood t ; ... ... 3 00 

Waite & Adams, supplies, 1886 bill k - 1 43 

Webber, J. A. janitor. 4950 

Westwood, Wm. & Co. wood 00 

Warren, I). S. & Co. coal 624 65 

Whyley, Fred, supplies 1 97 . 

Webb, H. B. supplies 2 35 

Ward, Thomas J. wood 195 26 

$8,662 99 

Dr. TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. Ob. 

To amount expended, $1,420.52 By appropriation, $1,000 00 

Capisic b'dge ac't r'ks, 50 52 

receipts, 21 00 

balance, 349 00 

$1,420 52 $1,420 52 

To balance, $349 00 



TOWN OFFICERS. 33 

Britt, Daniel, labor . : > $ 20 25 

Cotton, A. P. " 6 13 

Chandler, G. W. " 36 00 

Graffam, Robert F. " 76 50 

Hecla Powder Co 113 46 

Heffron, Michael, labor 63 75 

Hawes, Chas. B. " 84 00 

Hawes, Jos. est. " 52 00 

Higgins, Alex. " 33 00 

Libby, Sumner, sharpening drills and use of horse 204 28 

Lydon, James, labor 18 75 

Logue, Edward, " 10 50 

Libby, D. B. " 56 25 

McCafferty, Thos. " 88 50 

Manley Frank, " 35 25 

McCann, D. B. " 7163 

Nason, Ira, " 29 25 

Qualey Thomas, " 6 00 

Stevens, A. E. & Co. material 14 46 

Shaw, Lewis, labor 69 80 

Smith, L. B. " . . . . • 81 38 

Wescott, E. L. " 190 38 

Ward, Joseph E. " 3 00 

Worster, Stewart, " 56 00 

$1,420 52 

Dr. TOWN OFFICERS. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2,392 25 By appropriation. $2,000 00 

balance f'm 1888 acc't, 249 73 
balance, 142 52 

j>2»3g22JL $2,302 25 

To balance, $142 52 

Burnell, Ferdinand, town clerk $ 34 50 

Bradford, Luther, services as selectman, bal. of 1888 18 00 

Bradford, Luther, " " " 1889 486 00 

Cobb, Edward L. " " " 1888 and 1889 464 00 

Robbins, F. E. C. services as supervisor of schools 1888-'89 426 66 

Watson, S. M. school committee 1887 174 59 

Wilson, A. W. services as selectman, bal. 1888 63 50 

Wilson, A. W. " " " 1889 425 00 

Ward, George W. services as treasurer 1889 300 00 

$2,392 25 



34 RECEIPTS. 



RECEIPTS. 



ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 

Cumberland Mills Paper Co., sand $124 75 

" 124 75 

L. M. Clark, hay 25 00 

Milton Libby, bills collected 43 56 

L. M. Webb, sweet corn 37 00 

Milton Libby, sundry bills 37 85 

hay sold J. M. Pennell 28 14 

Win. H. Irish, hay. 11 63 

A. H. Goudy, sand 20 00 

M. Ilaniblet, " 35 00 

Wm. Bolton, " 1 50 

Allen, " 1 00 

A. T. Cobb, 25 pigs 50 00 

R. Stimson, sand 15 00 

" •' 5 00 

E. L. Cobb, horses 200 00 



$760 i8 



SCHOOL. 
School Fund and Mill Tax, 1888 and 1889 $5,083 16 



INCIDENTALS. 

Burnum's Circus $60 00 

Sale of old safe 10 00 

Rent Presunipscot Grange * 20 00 

~ ® 90 00 

COMMISSIONS AND ABATEMENTS. 
Railroad and Telegraph Tax $1,541 06 

OUT DOOR POOR. 

Received W-. F. Seal est $51 29 

Received from Town of Windham, Lowell child 60 50 

Received from Town of Minot, W. P. Berry 80 64 

$192 43 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PKOPERTY. 



35 



RACKLEFF STREET. 
Rocks sold Goudy, Stimson, Chase and Moulton $44 75 

STONE CRUSHER. 
Received of J. G. Noyes, for use of stone crusher $335 00 

TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. 

Received from Capisic bridge for rock $50 52 

Received from Arthur Milliken 21 00 

iff 1 52 

Whole amount of receipts $8,493 10 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Town farm, $5,000 00 

Town house and lot, 1,500 00 

Gravel pit, Morrill's, 200 00 

" East Deering, 100 00 

" " Allen's Corner, 300 00 

" Hussey's Hill, 50 00 

Land junction of Church 

and Prost streets, 100 00 

Lot and engine house, 
Woodfords, 1,000 00 



$8,250 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY. 



Stock, Farming Tools, 
at Farm. 



&c, 



1 pair horses, 


$375 00 


Blankets and robes, 


10 00 


4 cows, 


100 00 


4 hogs, 


70 00 


52 hens, 


26 00 


26 tons hay, 


260 00 


1 harrow, 


8 00 


1 disk harrow, 


15 00 


1 spring tooth harrow, 


18 00 


2 cultivators, 


10 00 


4 plows, 


20 00 


1 single harness, 


8 00 


1 set double harness, 


40 00 


1 pung, 


15 00 


1 wagon, 


25 00 


1 hay tedder, 


38 00 


1 mowing machine, 


55 00 


1 old " 


5 00 


1 horse rake, 


20 00 



2 hay racks, 


10 00 


2 pairs farm wheels, 


10 00 


2 farm carts, 


10 00 


3 sets wheels, 


10 00 


1 two horse dump cart, 


60 00 


1 " " sled, 


20 00 


1 " " traversrun'r 


sl'd, 20 00 


1 ox sled, 


10 00 


1 triangle, 


1 00 


1 iron bar, 


75 


1 grind stone, 


2 00 


3 chains, 


1 00 


Windmill, 


300 00 


2 halters, 


1 50 


4 hay forks, 


100 


Scythes and snaths, 


3 60 


Brushes and combs, 


1 00 


1 hay cutter, 


3 00 


1 garden fork, 
1 hitch weight, 


25 


1 00 


1 stone drag, 


2 00 


1 carriage jack, 


1 50 


2 ladders, 


3 00 


Spreader and yoke, 


1 00 


" " chain, 


75 


4 shovels and 2 picks, 


2 50 


2 manure forks, 


1 50 


2 potato diggers, 


50 


1 cider mill, 


15 00 


1 wheelbarrow, 


1 50 


15 cords manure, 


90 00 



$1,903 35 



Furniture as per Schedule 
in hands of Overseers, $308 98 



36 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY. 



SUPPLIES ON HAND. 



4 bush, barley, 


$ 3 60 


6 " beans. 


13 50 


6 " meal, 


3 00 


8 " corn, 


4 00 


4 " oats, 


1 60 


200 lbs. shorts, 


2 00 


10 gal. pickles, 


2 50 


5 lbs. tea, 


1 65 


50 gals, molasses, 
2 ddIs. pork, 


15 00 


x 26 00 


50 bush, potatoes, 


40 00 


4 bbls. flour, 


22 00 


Sugar, 
Tobacco, - 


1 00 


10 00 


10 lbs. butter, 


2 00 


400 lb. fish, 


15 00 


10 lb. lard, 


80 


Oil and barrels, 


7 00 


2 gross matches, 


4 00 


3 bush, beets, 


1 50 


25 lbs. evap. apples, 


3 75 


Soap and soapine, 


4 50 



STONE CRUSHER AND 
ROAD TOOLS. 



$184 40 



Crusher and engine, 


$1,500 00 


1 Champion road raach. 


200 00 


1 old road machine, 


25 00 


6 wheelbarrows, 


6 00 


2 iron bars, 


1 50 


2 iron road scoops, 


12 00 


Lot stone drills, 


20 00 


3 stone hammers, 


4 00 




$1,768 50 


Furniture and safes in 




office 


$350 00 


FIRE APPARATUS. 


5 hose houses, 


$ 500 00 


3 hose wagons, 


300 00 


3 hose carts, 


130 00 


4,200 feet fire hose, 


2,000 00 




$2,930 00 


Whole amount, 


$15>695 20 



Built. 


Expended. 


Value. 


1887 


$2,916 


$2,400 




532 


800 


1867 


1,800 


10,000 


1877 


4,000 


4,000 


1887 


3,000 


3,000 
6,000 




1,500 


1,200 


1879 


2,575 


1,800 


1879 


2,470 


1,700 




1,029 


1,200 


1882 


3,725 


3,500 


1881 


4,425 


4,000 


1880 


1,750 


1,500 


1887 


5,414 


4,000 


1888 


6,234 


6,200 


1877 


8,867 


8,000 



SCHOOL HOUSES AND ASSETS. 37 

SCHOOL HOUSES. 

Appraisal 
in 1878. 

Stroudwater $ 400 

Church Street 800 

Ocean Street, Woodfords 10,000 

Lunt's Corner 3,300 

Main Street (Cobb's Lane) 500 

Morrill's Corner (two houses) 7,000 

Riverton (Windham road) 1,500 

Allen's Corner 250 

East Deering 350 

Deering Point 950 

Libby's Corner 825 

Deering Center 

Nasou's Corner 

Saunders' Street 

Pitt Street 

High School 

$25,875 $66,437 $59,300 



ASSETS OF THE TOWN. 

Town Farm and Schedule of Town Property $ 8,250 00 

Personal Property 1,903 35 

Furniture, as per Schedule in Selectmen's office 308 95 

Supplies on hand at Farm 184 40 

Furniture and Safes at Town House 350 00 

Fire Apparatus 2,930 00 

Crusher and Engine and Road Tools 1,768 50 

School Property 59,300 00 

Balance of Taxes in hands of Collectors 24,601 89 

Tax Deeds in hands of Treasurer 5,518 17 

Cash in hands of Treasurer 8,511 29 

Due from the Towns of Windham and Westbrook, . 172 96 

Due from Individuals 246 82 

LIABILITIES. 

Bonded Debt $61,475 00 

Temporary Loan 42,300 00 

Outstanding Bills (estimated) 1,200 00 

$104,975 00 

Resources over Liabilities $ 9,071 33 



$114,046 33 



3 8 REG APIT ULATION . 



Bal. 


Bal. 


against 


in favor 


Town. 


Town. 


$1,632 09 


$ 


120 04 






4 27 




162 11 



RECAPITULATIOIT. 



Rec'pts. Expend- 
itures. 

Alms House and Farm $ 1760 18 $3,392 27 

Board of Health 600 00 720 04 

Burying Ground 100 00 95 73 

Commissions and abatements 4,784 35 4,622 24 

Capisic bridge 200 00 200 00 

Discount on taxes 1,363 60 1,287 94 75 66 

Engine house, Woodi'ords.... 100 00 11183 1183 

Electric light 2 000 00 600 00 1,400 00 

Hose houses and carriages. .. 1,000 00 999 11 89 

High School 2,778 48 2,317 21 

Fire proof vault 19 11 4 00 

Incidentals 1,590 00 2,032 12 

Out door poor 1, 106 40 1, 168 04 

Plummer H ill 21 00 7 50 13 50 

Pitt street school bouse 13 28 22 00 8 72 

Portland Water Co 3,058 26 2,650 00 408 26 

liep'rs on school house '87. .. 643 67 643 67 

Rep'rs on school house '89. . . 950 91 1,0S1 16 130 25 

Roads and bridges 9,162 13 9,917 75 755 62 

Rackleif street 344 75 341 32 3 43 

Sprinkling streets i . 300 00 300 00 

Support of schools 11,683 16 8,847 30 2,835 86 

Snow bills 96 18 195 42 99 24 

Sewer survey 1,000 00 546 00 454 00 

Stone crusher _ 335 00 577 59 242 59 

Town House ledge * 1,071 52 1,420 52 349 00 

Town officers 2,249 73 2,392 25 142 52 





461 27 




15 11 


442 12 




61 64 





$47,688 04 $46,493 01 $4,039 33 $5,834 30 
46,493 01 4,639 33 



Balance in favor of town, $1,195 03 $1,195 03 

Town orders drawn, $43,752 15. 



TEMPORARY LIABILITIES. 39 



TEMPORARY LIABILITIES 



Temporary Loan $42,300 00 

Outstanding Bills (estimated) 1,200 00 

$^3,500 00 

To meet these Liabilities are the following Resources: 

Balance in hands of Collector for 1877 $ 5 71 

1878 6 25 

1880 12 00 

1881 42 17 

1882 58 49 

" - 1883 50 13 

1884 266 01 

1885 1,747 85 

1886 225 82 

1887 2,820 06 

1888 1,823 12 

1889 17,544 28 

$24,60189 

Tax deeds in hands of Treasurer $ 5,518 17 

Cash in hands of Treasurer 8,511 29 

$14,029 46 



Due from Town of Windham, acct. Fields child. .:...$ 26 35 
Town of Westbrook,- account of M. D. Saw- 
yer and Mrs. Barbaskey 146 61 

Brackett, A. A. sand, 1887 7 50 

Berry, J. A. " 1887 6 21 

Curran, Martin " 1888 2 75 

Desmond, Frank " 18S9 4 00 

Files, T. S. " 1887 14 00 

Frye, J. J. " 1887 109 

Feeney, Patrick " 1889 2 50 

Hollis, J. F. " 1877 4 00 

Hollis, R. D. " 1887-89 25 

Hamblett, Melville " 1889 35 00 

Knowles, O. L. " 1888-89 4 00 

Kennard, C. A. & B. F. sand, 1889 75 

Lucas, William sand, 1889 40 00 

Meserve, Geo. " 1889 2 00 

Pride, H. " 1S87 15 25 

Howe, R. F. " 1889 20 25 

Rowe, Irvin " 1886 3 50 

Read, D. II . " 1887-88 3 25 

Snow, " 1889 100 

Stimson, R. S. " 1889 23 25 

Smith & Morton, " 18S9 7 00 

Johnson, hay 14 45 

Topliff, Dr. A. P. " 13 92 

Huston, E. II. " 14 90 



$ 419 78 



$39,051 13 



40 



COMPARATIVE VALUATION AND TOWN DEBT. 



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13 
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TREASURER'S REPORT . 



41 



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42 



STATEMENT OF THE TOWN DEBT, 



STATEMENT OF THE TOWN DEBT. 











RATE 




NUMBER OF 
BONDS. 


AMOUNT. 


DATE. 


TIME. 


PER 

CENT. 


WHEN DUE. 


64 to 74 inc. 


$5,500 00 


Juno 1, 1870 


15 yr's 





June 1, 1891 


78 


1,000 00 


Nov. 1, 1876 


15 " 


6 


November 1, 1891 


85 


500 00 


Apr. 1, 1877 


15 " 


6 


April 1, 1892 


87 to 88 inc. 


1,500 00 


June 1, 1877 


15 *' 


6 


June 1, 1892 


89 " 101 " 


6,500 00 


Dec. 1, 1877 


15 " 


5 


December 1, 1892 


117 " 130 " 


10,000 00 


Apr. 1, 1878 


15 " 


5 


April 1, 1893 


137 


500 00 


June 1, 1878 


15 " 


5 


June 1, 1893 


151 to 155 inc. 


2,500 00 


July 1, 1880 


15 " 


4 


Julv 1, 1895 


156 " 157 " 


1,500 00 


Oct. 1, 18S0 


10 " 


4 


October 1, 1890 


158 " 159 " 


1,000 00 


Nov. 1, 1880 


15 " 


4 


November 1, 1895 


160 " 176 " 


11,500 00 


Apr. 1, 18S2 


15 " 


4 


April 1, 1897 


177 " 189 " 


6,500 00 


Feb. 1, 1SS4 


10 " 


4 


February 1, 1894 


190 " 197 " 


6,750 00 


June 1, 1S87 


20 " 


4 


June 1, 1907 


198 " 206 " 


6,225 00 


June 1, 1888 


10 " 


4 


June 1, 1898 




$61,475 00 





Deering, Me., February 19, 1890. 

This is to certify that I have examined the accounts of the Se- 
lectmen and Treasurer of the Town of Deering, for the year 1889, 
and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched for. 

m (Signed) CHAS. H. -LEIGHTON, Auditor. 



collectors' accounts. 



43 



COLLECTORS' ACCOUNTS. 



Dr. 



1889. 
February 20. 



DANIEL D. OHENERY, Collector, 1877. 
1890. 
February 15. 



To Balance due the Town $ 24 06 



24 06 



February 20. 
To Balance due the Town $ 32 13 



DANIEL D. CHENERY, Collector, 1878. 
February 15. 



32 13 



February 20. 
To Balance due the Town $ 



DANIEL D. CHENERY, Collector, 1880. 
February 15. 



59 



By Cash paid Treasurer. . . 
Balance due the Town. 



Ok. 



By Cash paid Treasurer $ 18 35 

Balance due the Town 5 71 



21 06 



By Cash paid Treasurer $ 25 88 

Balance due the Town 6 25 



32 13 



. $ 72 59 
12 00 



84 59 



February 20. 
To Balance due the Town $ 



DANIEL D. CHENERY, Collector, 1881. 
February 15. 



186 92 



By Cash paid Treasurer. . . 
Balance due the Town. 



144 75 
42 17 



186 92 



February 20. 



DANIEL D. CHENERY, Collector, 1882. 
February 15. 



To Balance due the Town. 



$ 356 92 



By Cash paid Treasurer $ 298 43 

Balance due the Town ( 58 49 



356 92 



February 20. 
To Balance due the Town $ 111 30 



ELIAS M. JACOBS, Collector, 1883. 
February 15. 
By Cash paid Treasurer $ 61 17 



111 30 



Balance due the Town. 



50 13 
11130 



44 



COLLECTORS REPORT. 



GRANVILLE M. STEVENS, Collector, 1884. 
February 20. February 15. 

To Balance clue the Town ft 266 01 | By Balance due tbe Town. 



.ft 266 01 



GRANVILLE M. STEVENS, Collector, 1885. 
February 20. February 15. 

To Balance due tbe Town ft 1,747 85 | By Balance clue the Town . 



ft 1,747 85 



February 20. 
To Balance due tbe Town 



HENRY B. WEBB, Collector, 1S86. 
February 15. 



922 18 



ft 022 18 



By Cash paid Treasurer ft 696 36 

Balance due tbe Town 225 82 



ft 922 18 



February 20. 
To Balance due the Town ft 8,496 56 



HENRY B. WEBB, Collector, 1887. 
February 15, 



ft 8,496 56 



By Cash paid Treasurer. 

Balance due the Town 



.ft 5,676 60 
2,820 06 

ft 8,496 06 



February 20. 



FRED V. MATTHEWS, Collector, 1888. 
February 15. 



To Balance due the Town 



.$16,842 00 



116.842 0G 



By Cash paid Treasurer ftl5,<)18 94 

Balance due the Town 1,823 12 



ft 16,8 12 06 



FRED V. MATTHEWS, Collector, 1880. 

To Assessment ft54,(!44 52 I By Cash paid Treasurer. . 

I * Balance due Ibe Town. 



ft54,644 52 



, $37,100 24 
17,544 28 



154,644 52 



Balance due tbe Town from all the Collectors, $24,601 89 



Report of School Committee. 



To the Citizens of Deerin.g : 

The School Committee elected at the last annual town meeting 
in accordance with the special act of the Legislature, organized 
March 11, 1889. By the provision of the law members who should 
hold office for one two and three years, respectively, were desig- 
nated by lot, with the following result : 

One year — Fred. E. C. Robbing, Daniel 1). Chenery. 

Two years — Geo. W. Johnson, Reuel Small. 

Three years — Daniel W. XXawkes, Clinton A. Woodbury, Samuel 
A. Packard. 

Reuel Small was elected Chairman of the Board, and F. E. C. 
Robbins Superintendent of Schools. 

The general scope of the work of the committee is indicated by 
the following rules, adopted at a subsequent meeting: 

(1.) Each member of the committee is expected to visit any 
or all of the schools as convenient, or at the request of 
the Superintendent, and to report at each regular session 
of the board the number of visits and the condition of 
the schools visited. 

(2.) Questions of discipline and of school management are to 
be referred by the teachers to the Superintendent, and 
by him to the full board, if necessary. 

(3.) Standing committees of three members each are to be ap- 
pointed upon the following matters : Examination of 
teachers; grading and course of study; text books. 
The full board is to act as committee on estimates and 
expenditures. 

(4.) The general care of the school houses, including the em- 
ploying and oversight of the janitors, is to be divided 
among the members of the board. 

By the terms of the law the Superintendent has the care and 
supervision of the schools, under the direction of the committee, 
and acts as Secretary of the Board. Regular meetings of the board 
occur on the first Thursday of each month, except July and August. 
A number of special meetings have also been held during the year. 



46 SCHOOL REPORT. 

At the time of the writing of this report most of the bills for the 
winter term of schools, so far as the salaries of teachers and jani- 
tors are concerned, are, of course, unpaid. But as these salaries 
are for fixed amounts, and as especial pains have been taken to have 
all bills for fuel, incidentals, repairs, &c, presented, the following 
statement of receipts and expenditures for the current year, includ- 
ing bills contracted but not paid, is nearly exact : 

HIGH SCHOOL. 



Appropriation, 
State fund, 


$2,000 00 

250 00 

<ff>o op,n An 




'Jj^j^hJv Uv 


EXPENDITURES. 


Teachers 1 salaries paid, 

Teachers' salaries uupaid, 

Janitors' salaries paid, 

Janitors' salaries unpaid, . 

Fuel, 

Incidentals, 

Net bal. against town f'm old acc'ts, 


$1,327 86 
452 14 

83 00 

24 25 
134 22 
117 80 

141 16 

*o oqo 4% 


Balance against town, 


$ 30 43 


SCHOOLS. 


Appropriation, 
State fund, 


$6,600 00 
2,610 99 

$9,210 99 



EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries paid, $4,551 66 

Teachers' salaries unpaid, 2,227 67 

Janitors' salaries paid, 678 75 

Janitors' salaries unpaid, 239 50 

Fuel, 879 18 

Insurance policies renewed, 105 00 

Incidentals, 218 59 

Net bal. against town f'm old acc'ts, 150 41 

$ 9 > Q5Q 76 

Balance in favor of town, $160 23 



SCHOOL REPORT. 47 



REPAIRS. 

Appropriation, $500 00 

Balance from last year, 450 91 



-$ 950 91 

EXPENDITURES. 

Alterations at Saunders street school 

house, ' $517 63 

Other repairs, 583 26 

$1^10089 

Balance against town, $149 98 

The work of the schools for the past year, in the main, reflects 
credit upon teachers and pupils. In some respects a marked im_ 
provement is manifest. Very few changes have occurred in the 
teaching force. Our touchers have labored intelligently and faith- 
fully; they show themselves anxious to keep abreast with the times, 
to seek the best methods, to avail themselves of every suggested 
improvement, — in short, to make their work more thorough and 
practical from term to term. The schools are, as a ride, well gov- 
erned; with hardly an exception they are quiet, orderly and indus- 
trious. Corporal punishment is not often employed ; the intervention 
of the school authorities in matters of discipline is seldom neces- 
sary; and serious complaints on the part of parents or pupils are of 
rare occurrence. The record of attendance has been greatly marred 
during the winter term by the prevailing epidemic, but on the whole 
it comrpares favorably with that of former years. In this connec- 
tion it is proper to commend the work of the truant officers. Every 
notification of cases of truancy has been promptly attended to, and 
generally with satisfactory results. One boy, for persistent truancy, 
was brought before the trial justice and by him sentenced to the 
Reform School during his minority. 

During the year the course of study for the schools has been 
carefully revised. The course as now established is printed with 
this report. 

At the end of the school year in June a class of twenty-eight was 
graduated from the High School, and a class consisting of twenty- 
four girls and twenty-one boys was admitted to the school. The 
teachers report that this new class has made unusual progress in the 



48 SCHOOL REPORT. 

studies of the first two terms, thus showing the advantage of the 
extended course in the Grammar grade. The High School, in all 
its departments, is in excellent condition, and it gives promise of 
signal advancement in the future. 

The school property of the town is, for the most part, in good 
condition and adequate to the needs of the schools. Some changes 
and improvements are needed however. In the interest of the 
health of the pupils, and also as a measure of economy in the end, 
the cellars of several school houses should be cemented ; and some 
of the houses need painting. In the opinion of the committee an 
appropriation of $800 for repairs would provide for the cementing 
of several cellars, the painting of the two or three houses which 
need it most, and for the general repairs, including some much 
needed improvements and alterations in the buildings at Allen's 
and Riverton. 

At the last town meeting the question of putting steam heating 
apparatus into one of the Morrill's Corner school buildings was 
referred to the committee "with power." In the absence of a direct 
appropriation from the town, the committee did not feel justified 
in incurring the expense which such a change would involve. But 
the stoves which now heat the larger building are nearly worn out 
and must soon be replaced, and, in the end, the substitution of 
steam heat would doubtless be the most economical measure. From 
estimates which have been obtained we think that steam heating 
apparatus, by which both buildings can be warmed, can be put in 
for $700, and we recommend that that sum be appropriated for the 
purpose. 

At the beginning of the fall term the crowded coudition of the 
school at Oakdale compelled the transfer of some eighteen pupils 
to the Ocean street Grammar School. The residents of Oakdale 
feel that their children should be accommodated in the school house 
near home, and that the time has come for the finishing of the upper 
room in that building and the division of the school into two grades. 
Estimates have been obtained as to the cost of preparing the upper 
rooms for occupancy, from which we conclude that $1,100 would be 
sufficient for that purpose, and we recommend that that sum be 
appropriated. 

The committee would also recommend an appropriation of $800 
for the finishing and furnishing of the upper story of the school 



SCHOOL REPORT. 49 

building at Libby's Corner for use at the beginning of the next fall 
term. The Primary School in that building now registers some 
fifty pupils, and the school population of the neighborhood is fast 
increasing. At present the pupils of Grammar and Intermediate- 
grades, who live at Libby's Corner, attend the school at Bradley's. 
In the Bradley's school there were registered, the present term, 
twenty-six pupils, of whom eleven live at Libby's, ten at or near 
Stroudwater, two near Nason's Corner and only three at Bradley's. 
For some time, at least, the Stroudwater and Nason's Corner schools 
can very well accommodate all pupils below the High School grade 
living in those vicinities, and we think that it will be best, at the 
end of the next term, to discontinue the school at Bradley's for the 
present, and to establish two grades at Libby's. 

The following is the law in relation to free text books, as enacted 
by the last Legislature : 

Towns shall provide school books for the use of the pupils in the pub- 
lic schools at the expense of said town; and all money raised and appro- 
priated for that purpose shall be assessed like other moneys. 

School committees shall make such rules and regulations, not repug- 
nant to law, as they deem proper for the distribution and preservation 
of school books and appliances furnished at the expense of the town. 

This Act shall take effect August one, eighteen hundred and ninety. 

It will be seen that, in compliance with this law, money must be 
provided by the town to meet the expense of supplying all the 
pupils in our schools with the text books needed, beginning with 
the opening of the fall term. In order that an approximate esti- 
mate of the expense for the coining year might be made, the teach- 
ers have reported, as nearly as possible, the number of text books 
of the different kinds needed in their respective schools, and the 
State Superintendent of Schools has furnished, in a circular, inform- 
ation in regard to the prices at which the books may be purchased 
from publishers. On the basis of the statements thus obtained we 
estimate that to meet this exjoense the appropriation for schools 
should be increased this year by $2,000. We therefore recommend 
an appropriation of $8,800 for support of schools, including the 
purchase of the text books. It may be said, in this connection, that 
while the original burden which the free text book law imposes up- 
on the town is a considerable one, the experience of towns in which 
the plan has been tried indicates that the expense in succeeding 
years will be comparatively light. 

For the support of the Lligh School we recommend an appropri- 
ation of $2,000. 

The usual statistics are appended. 



50 



SCHOOL KEPORT. 



TABULAR VIEW OF SCHOOLS 



Regis- 
tered. 



Schools. 



High. 



Ocean St. Gram 



Saunders' St. In 
Saunders' St. P. 

Center Int 

Center Prim. . . 
L ant's Cor. G. . 
Lunt's Cor. P. . 
East D cering. . 

Winslow's 

Riverside ...... 

Riverton 

Allen's Corner. 



Nason's" Corner 
Libby's Corner 
Stroudwater. . . 
Morrill's Gram. 
Morrill's Int... 
Morrill's Prim. 

Bradley's 

Oakclale 



Teachers. 



Frank W. Davis,* Edgar 
H. Crosby ti 

Helen J. Webster 

Ch'lotte W. Montgomery 

Hiram C. Hawkes 1 t — 

Lucy S. Anderson 

E. L. Kimball* 

S. L. Chubbucl? 

I-I. Louise Chase 

Carrie E. Van Horn 

Hattie V. Elder 

Rose W. Lei and 

Melissa E. Elder 

Susie P. Kimball 

Charles E. Fitz,* Jane 
R. Hale t t 

Hattie J. Loring 

Lucy J. Goddard 

Mary E. Whittier 

E. J. Dyer,* Fannie E. 
Ilopkinson ft 

Isabel Jordan 

Lizzie B. Cobb 

E. E. Maxfleld 

Mary A. El well 

MyraL. Elder 

Anna V. Hunt,* t Ber- 
tha A. Knight t 

Grace Read 

Nellie L. Morrison 

A. P. Stockwell 



100 101 



72 96 



51 44 
92i 77 



89 



Average 
Attendance. 



»3 



0(3 



93 



87 



70 



73 



11 



30 30 

13 64 
10 
15 15 

12 

8 

12 



* Spring Term. t Fall Term. % Winter Term. 

Number of Scholars in Town April 1, 1S89, 
Increase from April 1, 18SS, to April 1, 1889, 
Number of Pupils registered, Spring Term, 

Fall 

Winter " 
Average attendance, Spring Term, 
Fall 
" " Winter " 

Respectfully submitted, 

Fred. E. C. Robbies, 
D. D. Chenery, 
Geo. W. Johnson, 
Reuel Small, 



1,447 
41 
902 
905 
831 
777 
791 
642 



D. W. Hawkes, 
Clinton A. Woodbury, 
Sam'l A. Pace:ard, 



S. S, Committee. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 51 

OOTJIE^SIE OIF 1 STITID^r- 



FIRST YEAE. I CLASS. 

Reading— Combination of word and phonic methods; chart and 
black-board exercises. Complete Part I Appleton's First Read- 
er or its equivalent. 

Number — Numbers one to ten inclusive by Grube method, with use 
of signs. 

Writing — Pupils learn to form all the small letters. 

Object Lessons and Miscellaneous Exercises. 

SECOND YEAR. H CLASS. 
Reading — First Reader completed, with supplementary reading. 

Spelling — Oral and written, words and sentences selected from 
reading lessons. 

Number — Writing numbers to 999. Roman numerals to 50. Grube 
method continued to 18, with written work in addition, subtrac- 
tion, multiplication and division. Addition and subtraction to 
extend to 100. 

Object Lessons, Hygiene, Etc., continued. 

Writing. 

THIRD YEAR. G CLASS. 

Reading — Second Reader completed, with supplementary reading. 

Spelling — Oral and written, from reading book or speller. 

Number — Writing of numbers through 100,000,000. Roman numer- 
als to 500. Addition and subtraction to hundreds of thousands. 
Multiplication tables, with division combined. Multiplication 
with multipliers not exceeding three figures. Simple exercises 
in U. S. money. 

Geography — Natural divisions of land and water. Drawing map 
of school-room, and similar exercises. Map of Maine. 






52 SCHOOL KBPOBT. 

Language — Simple exercises in expression, making of sentences, 

etc. 
Writing. 
General Exercises — Lessons in temperance, hygiene, etc. 

FOURTH YEAR. F CLASS. 

Reading — Second Reader and first half of Third, with supplemen- 
tary reading. 

Spelling— -Oral and written. Harrington's Speller through p. 56. 

Arithmetic — Division, long and short, U. S. money. Colburn's 
First Lessons, through section IV. 

Writing. 

Geography — The world as a whole, continents, etc. Elementary 
Geography through JST. E. States. 

Language — Hyde's Language Lesson as a guide with much practice. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

FIFTH YEAR. E CLASS. 

Reading — Third Reader completed, with supplementary reading. 
Constant practice in consulting the dictionary for pronunciation 
and meaning of words. 

Spelling — Oral and written. Finish Part I, Harrington's Speller. 

Language — Hyde's Lessons as a guide as far as Part III. 

Arithmetic — Work in the four fundamental rules. Primary Arith- 
metic. Fractions in simple o forms and with constant illustra- 
tions. Colburn's Lessons as far as section VIII. 

Geography — Elementary Geography through Europe. 

Writing. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

SIXTH YEAR. D CLASS. 

Reading — Fourth Reader, with supplementary reading. Constant 
use of dictionary. 



SCHOOL BBPORT. 53 

Spelling — Daily exercises in written spelling. 

Language — Hyde's Lessons as a guide, but extend the work. 

Geography — Elementary Geography, completed and reviewed. 

Arithmetic — Fractions. Decimals, and weights and measures as 
in Primary Arithmetic, with constant review of fundamental 
rules. Colburn's Lessons through section VIII. 

Writing. 

Miscellaneous Work. 

SEVENTH YEAR. C CLASS. 

Reading — Text book prescribed, with supplementary reading. 

Spelling — Written exercises daily. 

Arithmetic — Begin advanced book at Fractions. Fractions, deci- 
mals, weights and measures; as far as percentage. Colburn's 
Lessons continued. 

Geography — Advanced book. General definitions. North Ameri- 
ca, Canada, United States in detail, ' South America; as far as 
Europe. v 

Language — Practice in writing letters and compositions, and in 
correcting errors. Analysis of easy sentences. Some work in 
parts of speech. 

Writing. 

Miscellaneous Exercises. 

EIGHTH YEAR. B CLASS. 

Reading — Reader prescribed, with supplementary reading. 

Spelling — Daity exercises, with special reference to words most 
likely to be misspelled. 

Arithmetic — Percentage, insurance, interest (simple and compound) 
partial payments (U. S. rule), commercial and bank discount, 
stocks, etc., as far as ratio. Practice in mental work. 

Language — Text book in grammar prescribed, first half. 

Writing. 



54 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Geography- — Completed and reviewed. 
Miscellaneous Work. 

NINTH YEAR. A CLASS. 

Reading — Reader prescribed, with supplementary reading. 

Spelling — Daily exercises. 

Arithmetic — Text book completed and reviewed. Subjects previ- 
ously omitted to be taken. Many problems to be given from 
outside the text-book. 

Language — Grammar completed. Special attention to syntax. 
Constant practice in writing. 

Writing. 

U. S. History — Completed. 

General Exercises. 



GENERAL COURSE OF STUDY IN HIGH SCHOOL 

FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Term — Algebra, Physical Geography, English Grammar and 
Analysis. Spelling daily. 

Winter Term — Algebra, Physical Geography (first half), Book- 
keeping (last half), Language (English). Spelling daily. 

Spring Term — Algebra, Book-keeping, Language (English). Spell- 
ing daily. 

SECOND YEAR. 
* 
Fall Term — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Physiology. Spelling 

daily. 

Winter Term — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Physiology. Spell- 
ing daily. 

Spring Term — Geometry, Natural Philosophy, Physiology. Spell- 
ing daily. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 55 

THIRD YEAR. 

Fall Term — Modern History, Chemistry, Rhetoric. Spelling daily. 

Winter Term — Ancient History, Chemistry, Rhetoric. Spelling 
daily. 

Spring Term — Civil Government, English Literature, Analysis re- 
viewed. Spelling daily. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
Fall Term — English Literature, French, Geology. 
Winter Term — Astronomy, French, Previews. 
Spring Term— Astronomy, French, Reviews. 



OLASSIOAL COURSE. 

FIRST YEAR. 

Fall Term — Algebra, Latin Grammar and Reader. Spelling daily. 

WintSr Term — Algebra, Latin Grammar and Reader. Spelling 
daily. 

Spring Term — Algebra, Caesar, Ancient History. Spelling daily. 

SECOND YEAR. 

Fall Term — Caesar, Greek Grammar and Reader, Geometry. Spell- 
ing daily. 

Winter Term — Caesar, Greek Grammar and Reader, Geometry. 
Spelling daily. 

Spring Term — Cicero, Greek Grammar and Reader, Geometry, 
Latin Prose Composition. Spelling daily. 

THIRD YEAR. 
Fall Term — Cicero, Latin Prose Composition, Anabasis, Ancient 
Geography. Spelling daily. 



56 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Winter Term — Virgil, Anabasis, Greek Prose Composition. Spell- 
ing daily. 

Spring Term — Virgil, Anabasis, Greek Prose Composition. Spell- 
ing daily. 

FOURTH YEAR. 
Fall Term — Virgil, Iliad, Sal lust. 
Winter Term — Virgil, Iliad, Sallust. 
Spring Term — Review of Course. 

Two declamations, or recitations, and two essays each term are 
required of pupils in either course. 



Burying Grounds, 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Deering : 

Ex-Governor liobie truly says that cemeteries of an old town 
have a history and associations which language seems inadequate to 
express, and such places usually have but few attractions save hon- 
ored graves. 

In the absence of public ornaments, and expense by the town for 
public ornamentation, it seems that the town can afford to be lib- 
eral in its appropriations to keep in repair the ancient resting places 
of the dead. 

The appropriation of last year was one hundred dollars ; it was 
all that was asked for. The purposes for which it has been expend- 
ed are explained by the bills which have been presented to you. I 
have spent a good deal of time in superintending the work, for 
which I have made no charge. I have obtained all I could possibly 
for the amount appropriated. 

Two hundred running feet of fence, bordering upon the highway 
at Stroudwater, has been thoroughly repaired by putting in five new 
cased posts, a new gateway, new rails and two coats of white paint 
upon the surface of the whole. The unsightly, dilapidated hearse 
house, built about seventy years ago from funds raised by subscrip- 
tion, has been removed, and the old hearse, that was obtained at the 
same time and way of the building, and out of use for twenty-five 
years, has been destroyed. 

At this place are deposited the remains of Rev. Thomas Browne. 
He was a public character. Me came here in 1 T G -L and died in 1797, 
at the age of sixty-four years. The stone that marks his grave is 
broken, as several others are ; and what is true in this respect of the 
Stroudwater ground is true of all the places. 

Since my report of last year I have found a, later record relating 
to the so-called Bailey burying place on the Windham road. It 
may be seen at the Registry of Deeds, vol. 175, p. 134, A. D. 1841, 
James P. Bailey to widow Lydia Dyer of Portland. 



58 BURYING GROUNDS, 

"Reserving, however, the burying ground which is eight rods on 
said road; eleven rods in the rear, the southerly side line is twenty 
and a half rods long, and the northerly side line is nineteen and a 
half rods long." 

Attached to this record is a small plan of the burying plot. 

The fence on one of the side lines, as well as the rear fence, has 
gone to decay and a new fence is uecessary. 

Here are deposited the remains of Capt. Isaac Sawyer Stevens, a 
soldier of the Revolution who served through the war, but there is 
nothing upon the stone to indicate what he did for his country. He 
was the first Stevens who Jived upon the "Pine Plains' 1 of old Fal- 
mouth, now Deering. A great-grandson of his, and one of the 
town's noblest children who fell in defence of his country during 
the late war of the Rebellion, filled, 'till last spring, a nameless 
grave, when the stone bearing his name, found a mile distant, was 
laid upon the spot. 

The work commenced under the superintendence of the late 
Henry A. Hart, near Allen's Corner, where rest the remains of a 
Revolutionary soldier, as well as one who served the town of West- 
brook long and well as one of its officials, remains unfinished. 

The place at East Deering that contains many of the remains of 
that locality, among whom are those of Timothy Galvin, the cele- 
brated mathematician and school-master in his day, ueeds special 
attention this year. 

To do necessary repairing and keep under subjection the weeds 
and bushes, J would recommend an appropriation of $200. 
Very respectfully submitted, 

L. B. CHAPMAN. 



Report of Committee, 

TO WHOM WAS REFERRED THE FOLLOWING RESOLUTIONS, WITH 

POWER. 



Whereas, It is important that all public thoroughfares should 
be named, 

Resolved, 1st — That the Selectmen be authorized to make out a 
list of the public streets in the town, which have been duly accepted 
by the town, with the names of such as have been legally named ; 
also recommending names for any that have not been named. 

Resolved, 2d— -That no continuous street or thoroughfare, in or 
through the town, shall have more than one name, and the Select- 
men are hereby instructed to have suitable signs prepared, with the 
names of the streets thereon, placing one at each end of such streets 
as have been legally named, and report at the next annual meeting. 

Your committee find that the following streets and avenues have 
been accepted and named by the town, and on which signs have 
been placed, with the exception of Liberty, Leland, Leonard, Rich- 
ardson and Best streets, which were overlooked in searching the 
records : 

Brown street, Clinton avenue, Central avenue, Clark street, Deer- 
ing street, Elm street, Fessenrlen street, Falmouth street, Florence 
street, Forest street, George street, Grant street, Gray street, Green 
st., Hartly ave., High street, Lincoln street, Leland street, Leonard 
St., Liberty street, Longfellow street, Main street, Maple street, Me- 
chanic street, Noyes street, Oak street, Ocean street, Pearl street, ,, 
Prospect street, Pleasant street, Pitt street, Raokleff street, Read 'f 
street, Saunders street, Smith street, Spring street, South street, 
Union street, Veranda street, Winslow street, Woodford street, 
William street, Kidder street. 

Your committee also find the following streets which have not 
been named by the town, and we would submit the following names 
for the action of the town : * 



60 committee's report. 

Alder street. — From Gray street, near residence of Chas. Jack- 
son, to Falmouth line. 

Bedford street. — From Deering street, by Howard Winslow's, to 
terminus. 

Bond street. — From Westbrook to Congress street, near C. Max- 
field's. 

Broad street. — From Westbrook to Congress street near A. 
Halves' store. 

Cedar street. — From Morrill street south to terminus. 

Church street. — From Mason's Corner to Nason's Corner, so- 
called. 

Cherry street. — From Forest avenue, by A. McKone's, to Oak 
street. 

Chestnut street. — From Deering to High street. 

Congress street. — From Portland line at Libby's Corner, through 
Stroud water to Westbrook line, near W. D. Boothby's. 

Johnson street. — From Cape Elizabeth line, near G. W. Johnson's, 
to Congress street. 

Morse street. — From Main to Ocean street, near Lunt's Corner. 

Morrill street. — From Forest avenue to terminus. 

New street. — From Stevens Plains avenue to Lelaud street. 

North street. — From Spring to Saunders street. 

Plum street. — From High to Grant street. 

Ray street. — From Main street, near H. F. Milliken's, to Stevens 
Plains avenue. 

Riverside street. — From Main street, near J. Roberts', by J. 
Hawes' place, to Brighton street at town farm. 

Stevens Plains Avenue. — From Congress street, at Bradley's Cor- 
ner, by Brighton, Morrill's and Allen's Corners, to Falmouth line. 

Summit street. — From Stevens Plains avenue to Main street, near 
C. L. Knight's. 

Westbrook street. — From Cape Elizabeth Hue, near Reform 
School, to Westbrook line near Canal bridge. 

Brighton street. — From Portland line, by Town House, to West- 
brook line. 

Presumpscot street. — From Main to Ocean street, by Eastern 
Forge Company's works. 

Frost street. — From Congress street, at Brewer Hill, to Church 
street. 



committee's report. 61 

Your committee find by the records that there are two Clark Sts., 
one from Deering to High street (accepted in 1868), the other from 
Stevens Plains avenue to Smith street, and we would recommend 
the changing the name of the one from Deering to High street to 
Chestnut street. 

In regard to the streets from Forest avenue by A. McKone's, 
thence to Oak street, we find by plan in Registry of Deeds' office, 
1865, as laid out by Aaron Ring, the name from Forest avenue to 
Cherry street, Spring street ; from Oak street to Spring street, 
Cherry street. We have been unable to find any record of the ac- 
ceptance of those streets. But if the above streets have been ac- 
cepted, that they be called Cherry street, from Oak street, by A. 
McKone's, to Forest avenue, as we have one Spring street besides 
this. 

Respectfully submitted, 

J. N. Read, 
Charles E. Jackson, 
C. B. Varney, 
R. Y. Barber, 
J. H. Blake, 
G. G. Lane, 
Reuel Small, 
Geo. B. Leavitt, 
Chas. F. Sapford, 

Committee. 



STATE OF MAINE. 



In the Year op our Loud One Thousand Eight Hundred 

and Eighty. 



An Act Relating to Drains and Sewers in the Town of 

Deering. 



Be it enacted by the /Senate and House of Representatives in Leg- 
islature assembled, as follows : 

Section 1. The municipal officers of the town of Deering may, 
personally or by agency, lay out a public drain or common sewer, 
upon the written application of seven or more of its inhabitants. 
They shall give written notice of such application and of a hearing in 
regard to it, to be posted for seven days in two public places in the 
town and in the vicinity of the sewer, describing it in the notice. 

Section 2. A written return of their proceedings in all cases, 
containing the bounds, admeasurements and a profile description of 
the sewer, is to be made and filed with the town clerk. The sewer 
is not established and shall not be built until it has been accepted 
in a town meeting, legally called, after it has been so laid out, by a 
warrant containing an article for the purpose. 

Section 3. When said drain or sewer in completed, the muni- 
cipal officers shall adjudge what parcels of land are benefitted by 
such drain or sewer, and estimate and assess upon such lots and 
parcels of land and against the owner thereof, if known, such sum, 
not .exceeding such benefit, as they may deem just and equitable, 
towards defraying the expenses of constructing and completing such 
drain or sewer, the whole of said assessments not to exceed two- 
thirds of the cost of such drain or sewer, and such drain or sewer 
shall forever thereafter be maintained and kept in order by said 
town ; such municipal officers shall file with the clerk of said town 
the location of such drain or sewer, with a profile description of the 
same, with the amount assessed upon each lot or parcel of land so 
assessed, and the name of the owner of each lot or parcel of land, 



SEWER ACT. 63 

if known, and the clerk of said town shall record the same in a book 
kept for that purpose and within ten days after filing such notice, 
each person so assessed shall be notified of such assessment, by 
having an authentic copy of said assessment with an order of notice 
signed by the clerk, stating a time and place for a hearing on the 
subject matter of said assessments, given to the person so assessed, 
or left at his usual place of abode in said town ; if he has no place 
of abode in said town, then such notice shall be given to or left at 
the. abode of his tenant or lessee if he has one in said town; if he 
has no such tenant or lessee in the said town, then by posting the 
same in some conspicuous place in the vicinity of the lot or parcel 
of land so assessed, at least thirty days before said hearing, or such 
notice may be given by publishing the same three weeks successive- 
ly in any newspaper published in the city of Portland, the first 
publication to be at least thirty days before said hearing; a return 
made by a copy of such notice by any constable in said town, or 
the production of the paper containing such notice shall be con- 
clusive evidence that such notice has been given, and upon such 
hearing the municipal officers shall have power to revise, increase or 
diminish any such assessments, and all such revision, increase or 
diminution shall be in writing and recorded by such clerk. 

Section 4. Any person who is aggrieved by the doings of said 
municipal officers in laying out and constructing said sewer, or in 
making said assessments, may appeal therefrom to the next term of 
the Supreme Judicial Court which shall be holden in the County of 
Cumberland more than thirty days from and after the day when the 
hearing last mentioned is concluded, excluding the day of the com- 
mencement of the session of said court; the appellants shall serve 
written notice of such appeal upon said municipal officers fourteen 
days at least before the session of the court, and shall, at the first 
term, file a complaint setting forth substantially the facts in the 
case; either party shall be entitled to a trial by jury, or the matter 
in dispute may, if the parties so agree, be decided by a committee 
of reference, and the court shall render such judgment and decree 
in the premises as the nature of the case may require; at the trial 
exceptions may be taken to the ruling of the judge, as in other 
cases. 

Section 5. Whenever, in the judgment of said municipal offi- 
cers, the building of such drain or common sewer shall damage any 



64 SEWER ACT. 

land owner, the said municipal officers shall estimate, and the town 
shall pay, such damages, in the same manner and form as is pro- 
vided in the statutes, in relation to damages in building ways. 

Section 6. Any person may enter his private drain into any 
such public drain or sewer while the same is under construction and 
before the same is completed, and before the assessments are made, 
on obtaining a permit in writing from the municipal officers; but 
after the same is completed and the assessments made, no person 
shall enter his private drain into the same until he has paid his as- 
sessment and obtained a permit in writing from the municipal offi- 
cers. All permits given to enter any such drain or sewer shall be 
recorded by the clerk of said town before the same are issued. 

Section 7. All assessments made under the provisions of this 
act shall create a lien upon each and every lot or parcel of land so 
assessed, which lien shall continue one year after said assessments 
are payable, and within ten days after they are made the clerk of 
said town shall make out a list of all such assessments, the amount 
of each assessment, and the name of the person, if known, against 
whom the same is assessed, to be by him certified; and he shall de- 
liver the same to the treasurer of said town, and if said assessments 
are not paid within three months from the date of said assessments, 
then the treasurer shall proceed and sell such of said lots or parcels 
of land upon which such assessments remain unpaid, or so much 
thereof, at public auction, as is necessary to pay such assessments, 
and all costs and incidental charges, in the same way and manner 
that real estate is advertised and sold for taxes under Chapter Six 
of the Revised Statutes, which sale shall be made Avithin one year 
from the time said assessments are made; and upon such sale the 
treasurer shall make, execute and deliver his deed to the purchaser 
thereof, which shall be good and effectual to pass the title to such 
real estate. 

Section 8. Any person to whom the right by law belongs, may 
at any time within one year from the date of said sale, redeem such 
real estate by paying to the purchaser or his assigns the sum for 
which the same was sold, with interest thereon at the rate of twenty 
per cent, per annum with cost of re-conveyance. 

Section 9. If said assessments are not paid and said town does 
not proceed to collect said assessments by a sale of the lots or par- 
cels of land upon which said assessments are made, or does not col- 



SEWER ACT. 65 

lect or is in any manner delayed or defeated in collecting such 
assessments by a sale of the real estate so assessed, then the .said 
town, in the name of the inhabitants of said town or in the name of 
such town, may sue for and maintain an action against the party so 
assessed for the amount of said assessment as for money paid, laid 
out and expended, in any court competent to try the same, and in 
such suit may recover the amount of such assessment with twelve 
per cent, interest on the same from the date of said assessment, and 
costs; provided, however, that if any lot when sold in the manner 
before provided shall not sell for enough to pay the amount of said 
assessment with interest and costs, the owner thereof shall be un- 
der no personal liability for the same. 

Section 10. The municipal officers of the town may employ 
one of their number, or some other person, to attend the sale of 
real estate to be sold for assessments under the provisions of this 
act, and bid therefor a sum sufficient to pay the amount due and 
charges, in behalf of the town, and the deed shall be made to it. 

Section 11. This act shall not have any validity until it is ac- 
cepted by a vote of the town of Deering, in a town meeting legally 
called lry a warrant containing an article for the purpose. 

Section 12. This act shall take effect when approved. 



In House or Representatives, March 2, 1880. 
This bill having had three several readings, passed to be enacted. 

GEO. E. WEEKS, Speaker. 

In Senate, March 3, 1880. 
This bill having had two several readings, passed to be enacted. 

JOS. A. LOCKE, President. 



March 4, 1880. 
Approved. 

DANIEL F. DAVIS, Governor. 



66 SEWER ACT. 

STATE OF MAINE. 

Office of Secretary of State. 

I hereby certify that the paper to which this is attached is a true 
copy of the original act deposited in this -office. 

<{ seal y In testimony whereof, I have caused the Seal of the 
State to be hereunto affixed. 
Given under my hand at Augusta, this twenty-fourth day of 
March, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and 
eighty, and in the one hundred and fourth year of the Independence 
of the United States of America. 

J. 0. SMITH, Deputy Secretary of State. 
Accepted at annual meeting March 21st, 1881. 



Report of Committee on Survey. 

To the Inhabitants of Deering ; 

The Committee on Survey of the Town have the honor to report : 

This committee was chosen at the annual town meeting in 1888. At 
the annual meeting in 1889 it was authorized to continue the survey so 
far as the unexpended balance of the money raised for that purpose 
would go. 

The town, at a special meeting held April 12th, 1889, accepted and 
provided means to build a sewer, located " through Fessenden street, 
thence through Forest avenue to an outlet at Deering's Bridge." A 
town meeting was held June 18th, to see if the town would change the 
location of the outfall of this sewer. At this meeting the matter under 
consideration was referred to your committee with instructions to report 
at an adjournment. 

The committee caused an examination by borings to be made of a 
portion of Forest avenue included in the location in question, and . 
recommended "that the town discontinue that portion of the main 
sewer as laid out on Forest avenue, from a point near the intersection 
of Bedford street with Forest avenue, to the culvert at Deering's Bridge," 
and "that a new sewer be laid out from Forest avenue to low water 
mark, beginning at some point between the northwest line of Bedford 
street and the Elias Hersey house," and "that a town way be laid out 
from Forest avenue, running in a northeasterly direction to low water 
mark, commencing at some point on Forest avenue, between the north- 
west line of Bedford street on said Forest avenue and the Elias Hersey 
house on said avenue." And it was voted "that the Committee on Sur- 
vey be instructed to take such measures as may be necessary to carry 
out in legal form the recommendations reported by the committee at 
this meeting." 

Under these instructions your committee have petitioned the Select- 
men to lay out a way and sewer as indicated, and have requested the 
Selectmen to insert an Article in the Warrant for the annual town meet- 
ing, to see if the town will discontinue the location in question. 

The problem of sewerage in Deering has been submitted by the Se- 
lectmen to Mr. J. Herbert Shedd, C. E., a distinguished specialist. Mr. 



68 SURVEY REPORT. 

Shedd's report to the Selectmen has been published in the newspapers, 
and will, we are assured, be printed in the Town Report herewith. 
Your committee have referred this matter to their engineers, whose re- 
port thereupon we submit. A comparison of these reports will show 
points of difference which are, mainly : ( i ) as to the amount of rain 
water which should be admitted into the sewers, Mr. Shedd admitting 
roof water and Ilsley & Cummings excluding it ; (2) as to size and char- 
acter of pipes, Mr. S. increasing the diameter of the pipe on Fessenden 
street from six inches, as recommended by I. & C, to eight inches, and 
recommending a 20x30 brick main in place of a 20 inch cylindrical 
pipe ; (3) as to outfall, Messrs I. & C. maintaining that it should be 
down the Bedford street hollow, and Mr. Shedd recommending that it be 
from a point about 100 feet southerly from Deering street to the middle, 
of the ship channel. 

The municipal officers of the town have located outfall sewers ac- 
cording to each of these plans. Both locations, with plans, profiles and 
estimates of cost, will come before the town at its annual meeting for 
acceptance or rejection. 

Your committee have carried their survey through Ocean and Main 
streets, in order to connect the work of last year with the survey at 
East Deering. We submit plans and profiles of Ocean, Main from 
Ocean to the channel at Tukey's Bridge, and Veranda from the Grand 
Trunk location to Main, with the side streets leading into them. We 
submit a plan for sewerage at East Deering with profiles and estimates 
of cost. Although we have surveyed Ocean street, and Main street from 
Lunt's Corner to East D.eering, we have not attempted to project any 
scheme for the sewerage of the large territory lying on both sides of 
these streets and sloping to Back Cove. The reasons are obvious and 
are stated in the report of our engineers. 

The grade of Forest avenue, in its relation to the plane of the main 
sewer, has been considered. In making their study of that subject our 
engineers have developed a grade for this street. Although not a mat- 
ter with which your committee is charged, we yet believe it to be of 
such importance that we submit a profile with proposed grade lines from 
Pleasant street to Deering's Bridge. These lines are in conformity with 
the lines recommended by your committee in 1889 for grade of main 
sewer. The details of the plan and estimates of cost are given in the 
report of our engineers. 



SURVEY REPORT. 69 

We believe that the cost of this work could be materially reduced by 
carrying along with it the laying of the main sewer, and the re-building 
of the road bed, now nearly worn out. 

We believe that grade lines should be established for this street before 
it is lined with buildings, erected without reference to anything of the 
kind, and thus avoid land damages. In the grade proposed a contin- 
uous descent is made from Pleasant street to the Bedford street hollow, 
with light cuts and fills except at the Coyle gully. With the street graded 
we have rapid surface drainage and no standing water. 

We believe that no part of the main sewer should be laid, or road bed 
renewed in a permanent manner, without bringing the surface of the 
road to an established grade. We append the reports of our engineers 
upon matters referred to them. 

All of which is respectfully submitted. 

Edward Moore, 
John M. Adams, 
Henry Deering, 
N. K. Sawyer, | 
Andrew Hawes, J 



y Committee. 



REPORTS OF MESSRS. ILSLEY & CUM MINGS, CIVIL EN- 
GINEERS. 



[on borings at deering point.] 

Portland, June 22, 1889. 
Col. Edward Moore, Chairman of Committee on Survey of a Sew- 
erage System for the Town of Deering : 

In accordance with orders from your committee, we had soundings 
made with the following results, as shown by the profile presented. 

We reached quicksand at an average sounding of five feet and nine 
inches below the surface of the street, passing through a wet sand with 
a clay mixture at the average depth of two feet below street surface. 

This wet strata of sand overlying the quicksand discharged water 
into the borings, which rose at the rate of 15 inches in 30 minutes, 
causing a continual dropping of the sides of the borings. At Station 
rox6o we reached wet sand at six feet and soft blue clay and quicksand 



70 SURVEY REPORT. 

at eight feet, in which a two inch rod was pressed quite easily by the 
hands to the depth of eleven feet below the surface of the street. 

At Station 9x25 water was found at seven feet, quicksand at eight 
feet into which was pressed by hand a three-fourth inch rod fifteen feet, 
or twenty- three feet below the street surface. 

At Station 7x75 water was reached at six feet six inches, with quick- 
sand ; sounding at this station with a three-fourth inch rod pressed by 
hand at a depth of twenty-four feet below street surface. 

At Station 6 we found quicksand at a depth of six and one-half feet 
below street surface, and water making quite fast at nine feet ; sounded 
to twenty feet below surface in same class of material as last sounding ; 
in this boring a ten foot pole, at nine feet, sunk by its own weight to ten 
feet when it was taken out. 

At Station 4, sand at one foot, six and one-half feet to water, and 
pressed sounding rods to twenty-one feet below surface ; this boring 
showed quicksand nearer the surface than any of the others, and offered 
less resistance to the sounding rod ; water rapidly rose and the walls of 
the boring were continually falling. 

We are convinced, from the knowledge thus gained, to reach the 
grade called for in this section would be difficult and expensive, for 
when the proper depth is obtained, which can only be done by double 
sheathing and good pumping capacity, we would then have the problem 
of proper foundation for the sewer. 

We should not consider that timber flooring would be safe, as by a 
settling ever so slight, a materia] as fine and full of water as examined 
would easily find its way into any leakage of the pipe, not only reducing 
its capacity but allowing the surrounding ground to be permeated with 
sewage matter. 

Respectfully submitted, 

(Signed,) ILSLEY & CUMMINGS, 

Civil Engineers. 

[ON REPORT OF J. HERBERT SHEDD, C. E.] 

Portland, Feb. 10, 1890. 
Col. Edward Moore, Chairman of the Committee on Survey of the 
Town of Deering : 
After a careful consideration of the report of J. Herbert Shedd, C 



SURVEY REPORT. 71 

E., of Providence, R. I., of the date of Aug. 5, 1889, we agree, and 
have provided in our report of Feb. 7, 1889, that the liquid household 
wastes, and a limited amount of water from wet cellars, should enter the 
sewers, but we do not consider it advisable to allow roof water, as it can 
be provided for in surface drainage, while its entrance into sewers neces- 
sitates larger sizes, and therefore greater cost of construction. 

The usual method of flushing, at man and flush holes, on portions of 
the lines requiring it, affords the same result, which method we recom- 
mended in our report of Feb. 7, 1889. 

There should be no increase of cost over estimates of the above date, 
and although at that time we were in ignorance of the condition of a 
portion of Forest avenue, the result of such investigation being shown 
in our report of June 22, 1889, yet we feel it our duty to reach an out- 
fall, and not vary, if possible, the total cost heretofore submitted. 

In our report of Feb. 7, 1889, we provided for two hundred and ninety 
acres of water-shed — under the so-called separate system, which re- 
quired a twenty inch outlet sewer, receiving into it only the sink, water 
closet, and a limited amount of water from wet cellars. With the grades 
as shown on the profiles, this size has sufficient capacity. 

The deep water of the government channel is mutually agreed upon 
as the proper place to discharge the sewage, and we claim the only route 
is via Bedford street hollow. For this the reasons are obvious, as by 
this route a cheaper line can be obtained, and why? because, by the 
existence of quicksand known to lie between a point opposite the Port- 
land Street Sprinkling Co.'s stable and a point opposite the north line 
of the Elias Hersey property on Forest avenue, the laying of a twenty 
inch sewer would increase the cost in that locality over the former esti- 
mate. 

We have consulted with gentlemen whose experience in quicksand 
has proved to them that the expense of a sewer laid in that locality 
would be two and one-half times over a similar class of work in dry 
earth excavation. 

If the same discharging point can be reached by a less cost per run- 
ning foot than by another route, then that seems to be the only route. 

We therefore, having the town's interest in view, deem it expensive 
and inexpedient to lay the main outfall sewer on that portion of Forest 
avenue from the lane to a point near Station 10x60 or at Station 12, but 
make a point near these stations the diverting one for a cheaper and 



72 SURVEY REPORT. 

equally as direct a line to the deep water of the government channel. 

As Mr. Shedd says, it is not an uncommon thing to meet with quick- 
sand in such work ; but it cannot be denied that expense follows in pro- 
portion to the depth made in such material. 

Cement work, either in brick or in salt-glazed vitrified pipe joints, 
should not be laid in water, or have water in contact during the process 
of setting, more especially if there be a movement of the water, which 
is unavoidable. Should the cement mortar be thus washed, the cement 
will immediately separate from the sand. 

Many errors have been made from laying a sewer pipe in the presence 
of water, and the carelessness of workmen has caused many a death 
in the household when such operations have been near or within a 
dwelling 

To lay a sewer in such excavations and avoid the contact of water, 
calls forth a. labor of some considerable amount, and herein lies one of 
the principal expenses, pumping ; not only should this be carried on by 
day, but by night if water is found in quantity. 

If the idea prevails that the water can be passed through the newly 
laid sewer and over green work without damage, it is wrong; this saving 
in construction would be a dear expense in the maintenance of the 
works. 

The grades shown in the profiles represent the inside crown of the 
sewers, and have a depth of cover varying from six to eight feet, except 
the blue line on Forest avenue which was drawn to represent the full 
depth of cutting and conform to a grade or grades that would fit the 
street's surface from Coyle's gully. 

We quote from a work on Sewerage Systems by Cady Staley, President 
of Case School of Applied Science, Cleveland, O., and George S. Pier- 
son, C. E. ; who was in charge of the construction of a sewerage system 
for Schenectady, N. Y. 

They mention the uncertain item of cost in trenching, laying pipes 
and refilling, and say as follows : 

"This will depend upon the nature of the soil in which the sewer is tu- 
be laid." 

"Quicksand is the most difficult material to manage." 

"It will cost from two to five times as much to put in a sewer in quick- 
sand as it will in ordinary earth." 

In the works at Schenectady, N. Y., it cost more per running foot to 



SURVEY REPORT. 73 

lay a ten inch pipe ten feet deep than it did to lay the same size twelve 
to fifteen feet, for the reason that water was encountered in the former. 

ILSLEY & CUMMINGS, 

Civil Engineers. 

[on survey of ocean street and east deering.] 

Portland, Feb. 17, 1890. 
Col. Edward Moore, Chairman of the Committee on Survey of the 

Town of Deering : 

Dear Sir : — The undulating ground of Ocean street, with the rising- 
land to the north, has its water-shed, Back Cove, and is divided from 
the water-shed of East Deering Point by valleys, or swales, crossing 
Main street at about right angles, and shown on profile at Stations 1 7 
and 29. This cut off compels all drainage to pass to the shore of the 
Cove, and calls for an intercepting sewer as recommended in our report 
of Feb. 7th, 1889. 

We do not see that it is necessary to advance the details of such a 
scheme, the time not yet having arrived when circumstances would war- 
rant the expense that might arise from such an undertaking, and we 
therefore confine ourselves to that part of E. Deering Point which em- 
braces the water-shed southerly of the brick yard swale, and west of the 
Grand Trunk Railway location. This area can be conducted by one 
outfall sewer to the natural channel at the end of the solid fill at Tukey's 
Bridge. 

The falling land of Forest street (northerly) allows for only two hund- 
red feet of sewer leading to Veranda street, and on Winslow street two 
hundred feet can drain to Veranda street. The remainder of Winslow 
street can be carried across lots to Water street and thence to Main 
street. 

The entire length of Veranda street, from the Grand Trunk Railway 
location, can be led to Main street; thence by Main street through the 
centre of the solid fill on Tukey's Bridge, passing through the stone 
heading at about mean tide or city base. Reference to plans and pro- 
files show the size and location of sewers recommended, and the streets 
that can be drained to an outlet in Tukey's Bridge. 

We also show profiles of Ocean, Main, Morse and Presumpscot Sts. 
These cannot be used at present, but if, at any time, it is necessary to 



$ 


578 00 










I 


,648 78 

265 20 
210 00 












40 00 

$2 


,74* 


98 










274 


19 


Ol6 


17 








Pd: 



74 SURVEY REPORT. 

establish grades upon them, or the town sees the necessity of further 
extension, they can be utilized. 

Estimated cost of construction as follows : 

850 feet 6 inch pipe, 
1,922 feet 8 inch pipe, 
520 feet sheathing, 

3 man holes, 

4 flush or lamp holes, 

Contingencies of 10 per ct., 

Or 3,292 feet at 91 6-10 per foot. 

Respectfully submitted, 

ILSLEY & CUMMINGS. 

[on grade for forest avenue.] 

Portland, Feb. 17, 1890. 
Col. Edward Moore, Chairman of Committee on Survey for the 

Town of Dee ring : 

Dear Sir : — We present herewith a profile of Forest avenue, from 
Deering's Bridge to Pleasant street at Woodford's Corner, on which are 
drawn grade lines to conform to the surface, having in view a continuous 
falling grade to Bedford street hollow, and a minimum cut and fill. 

From Station 8 the grade falls both ways to Deering's Bridge and Bed- 
ford street hollow, the intention being to cut as little as possible on that 
portion of Forest avenue where trouble has been encountered in prepar- 
ing a road bed, and where the surface thus prepared is difficult to re- 
move. 

From Station 12 there is laid on the profile a continuous rising grade 
to Pleasant street, broken in the rise per hundred feet to equalize the 
cuts and fills (except Coyle's gully), and to conform to the residences 
now built. 

The necessity of a building grade, to be established, becomes appar- 
ent, not only for the uniform height of foundations, but it establishes a 
water-shed and a more uniform depth of material over sewer grades 
accepted. 

Coyle's gully requires about five thousand (5,000) cubic yards of ma- 



SURVEY REPORT. 75 

terial, of which about fifteen hundred is to come from some source 
separate from street grading. 

The approximate cost is as follows, which includes a proposed change 
of grade shown on the profile in blue : 

6,400 cubic yards earth at 40 cents, $2,560 00 

1,100 cubic yards ledge at $2.00, 2,200 00 

1,600 cubic yards earth emb'k over ex., 1,600 00 

Retaining walls at Coyle's gully (about). 2,000 00 



$8,360 00 
Ten per cent., 836 00 



$9,196 00 
ILSLEY & CUMMINGS. 



Warrant for March Meeting, 1890. 

To Fred V". Matthews, Constable of Deering, in the 
County of Cumberland, 

GREETING : 

In the name of the State of Maine, you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of the said Town 
of Deering, qualified by law to vote in town affairs, to as- 
semble at the Town House in said town, on Monday, the 
third day of March, 1890, at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to act on the following articles, to wit : 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 
I.. Art. 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the ensu- 

ing year. 
£- " Art. 3. To see if the town will grant and raise such sums 
of money as may be necessary for the maintenance and support 
of schools, including the purchase of text books for the pupils 
as required by law, and the poor, and repairs of roads and 
bridges, and to defray all other town charges for the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 4. To hear and act upon the reports of the selectmen, 
treasurers verseers of poor ancL superintending school committee. 

Art. 5. To see what the town will allow per hour for the 
labor of men, horses and oxen on the highway'. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will authorize the assessors to 
make such abatements as may be necessary. 

Art. 7 To see if the town will make a discount on taxes 
paid within a given time and charge interest thereafter. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen and 
treasurer to hire money temporarily for the use of the town in 
anticipation of taxes, provided the same shall be necessary. 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 77 

Art. 9. To see what action the town will take in regard to 
the pay of town officers. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will raise money for a Free 
High School, and how much. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will authorize the municipal 
officers to quit claim title to property held by the town under 
tax deeds, by payment of taxes and charges by persons claim- 
ing to own said property. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to tax dogs. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen to 
purchase material for repairs on roads and bridges. 

Art. 14. To see what instruction the town will give the 
treasurer in relation to tax deeds. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise ($300) three 
hundred dollars to sprinkle the street from Deering Bridge to 
Maine Central station at Woodfords. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to heat the school 
house at Morrill's Corner with steam, and raise money for the . 
same. 

Art. 17. To see if the town will vote to finish and furnish 
the second story of the school house at Oakdale, and raise 
money for the same. 

Art 18. To see if the town will vote to finish and furnish 
the second story of the school house at Libby's Corner, and 
raise money for the same. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to hold its meetings 
on the line of the horse railroad, by request of C. E. Jackson. 

Art. 20. To see if the town will rebuild the bridge across/. ^ 
Stroudwater river on the Buxton road, and raise money for the ' . -^ c (j 
same. 

] Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to organize fire com- 
panies to man the hose reels in the several sections of the town, 
fix the compensation of the firemen, and raise money for the 
same. By request of Edward Newman and others. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to widen the two cul- 
verts on Riverside road, near the residence of A. F. Minott, 



78 WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 

and raise four hundred dollars for the same. By request of 
Martin Curren, Jr. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to purchase a steam 
fire engine and raise money for the same. By request of W. 
H. Scott. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to name the street 
leading westerly from Forest avenue by the residence of A. A. 
McKone, to Cherry street so called, Grove street. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will vote to locate a hydrant 
on the corner of Saunders street, near the school house, and 
raise money for the same. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to locate two addi- 
tional hydrants on Spring street, one near the house owned by 
A. S. Wentworth, and one at Higgins' Corner, so called, and 
raise money for the same. 

Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to amend the record 
of Nevens street, so called, to conform to the manner in which 
the street was constructed by the town, and as per new record 
now on file. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to blast out the ledge 
on Read street, and raise money for the same. By request of 
Chas. Goodridge. 

Art.IJP. To see if the town will vote to build a new Alms 
House/anchraise money for the same. 

Art. 30.JxTo see if the town will vote to sell the Town 
Farm. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will vote to accept the Jury 
list as revised by the municipal officers. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will vote to raise six hundred 
dollars to continue the work of grading the road in front of the 
Town House. 

Art. 33. To see what action the town will take in relation 
to railroad crossings at grade where there are no gates or flag- 
men, and in relation to the obstruction of highways by trains. 

Art. 34. To hear and act on the report of the committee on 
survey of the town. 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 79 

Art. 35. To see if the town will accept the grade lines of 
Forest avenue from Pleasant street to Deering's bridge, as rec- 
ommended by the committee on survey, and establish the same. 

Art. 36. To see if the town will vote to accept and con- 
struct a town-way beginning at a point on Forest avenue, nearly 
opposite Kennard's brick stable, and leading easterly to the 
Government channel, as laid out by the selectmen, and raise 
money for the same. 

Art. 37. To see if the town will vote to accept and con- 
struct a public drain or sewer beginning at a point on Forest 
avenue, nearly opposite Kennard's brick stable, and leading 
easterly to the Government channel, as laio* out by the select- 
men, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 38. To see if the town will vote to accept a town-way 
or landing beginning at a point on Forest avenue about 168 feet 
southerly from Bedford street, so called, and running easterly to 
the westerly line of the Government channel, proposed, as laid 
out by the selectmen, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 39. To see if the town will vote to accept and con- 
struct a public drain or sewer, beginning at a point on Forest 
avenue, about 168 feet southerly from Bedford street, so called, 
and running easterly about 300 feet to high water mark; thence 
to the Government channel as excavated ; as laid out by the se- 
lectmen, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 40. To see if the town will vote to discontinue so much 
of the main sewer accepted at the special town meeting, held 
April 12th, 1889, as lies between the intersection of Bedford 
street with Forest avenue, and the culvert at Deering's bridge, 
or any part thereof. 

Art. 41. To see if the town will vote to instruct the select- 
men to petition the county commissioners to locate and define 
the limits and boundaries of all county roads in the town, where 
the true boundaries thereof are doubtful, uncertain or lost. 

Art. 42. To see if the town will vote to instruct the select- 
men to withdraw the petition presented to the Honorable Board 
of County Commissioners, dated October 17th, A. D. 1889, and 



80 WARRANT FOE, MARCH MEETING- 

request the board to suspend indefinitely all proceedings con- 
nected therewith. By request of Walter Fickett and others. 

Art. 43. To see if the town will rescind the vote passed at 
the last annual meeting, to instruct the selectmen to remove the 
hay scales from the highway at Libby's Corner in said town. 

Art. 44. To see if the town will vote to protect the town's 
property at Stroudwater, known as the town landing, against all 
encroachments. By request of L. B. Chapman. 

Art. 45. To see if the town will vote to repair the clap- 
boards on the Town House and paint the outside of said house. 
By request of L. B. Chapman. 

Art. 46. To heaT and act upon the report of the committee 
on street signs and names of streets. 

Art. 47. To hear and act upon the report of the committee 
on by laws, appointed at the last annual meeting. 

Art. 43. To see if the town will adopt by-laws that may be 
presented to the meeting. 

Art. 49. To sec if the town will authorize the selectmen to 
employ a clerk*. By request of C. A. Woodbury. 

Art. 50. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen to 
continue the contract for the four lights in excess of the number 
authorized at the last annual meeting, located as follows: one 
at the head of Ocean street, one at J. J Frye's, one at corner 
of High and Spring streets, and one near Westbrook Seminary, 
and raise money for the same. - 

Art. 51. To see if the town will vote to locate electric lights 
at the following points, to wit: Gne^airNasoiis Corner, one on 
Pje-ew-ng-^treetr near Lincoln, one on Forest avenue, near resi- 
dence of Mrs. W. Ii. Kenney, one on the Deering road, near 
the residence of Henry Deering, one at Higgins' Corner, on 
Spring street, and one at Brighton's Corner, so called, near the 
residence of Sumner Libby, and one at Morrill's Corner, near 
\the drinking fountain, and raise money for the same. 

4 Art. 52. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, beginning at a point on the souther- 
ly side of Read street, and to be a continuation of Cedar street, 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 81 

running southerly about 127 feet, thence south-westerly 280 
feet to Forest avenue, near Mary A. Ramsey's house, and raise 
money for the same. 

Art. 53, To see if the town will vote to accept a street as A 
laid out by the Selectmen, to be called West street, beginning^ / 
at a point on Forest avenue opposite the residence of O. A. 
Hill, and running westerly to the Plains road across land of the 
Alfred Stevens' estate and land of John S. Matthews and Harry 
W. Kimball, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 54. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Wentworth street, begin- 
ning at a point on the southerly side of Spring street about 107 
feet north-westerly from A. S. Went worth's new house, and 
running southerly to Rackleff street, so-called, wholly across 
land of A. S. Wentworth, and raise money to build the same. 

Art. 55. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as-w i 
laid out by the selectmen, the same to be a continuation of V ^ 
Grant street, beginning at a point on the southerly side of Pearl i , -> 
street, where it intersects with Giant street, and running south- ' £} * 
erly to Prospect street, across land of L. J. Perkins* Oren 
Plooper, and Rosamond U. Riclgeway, and raise money for the 
same. 

Art. 56/KTo see if the town will vote to accept a street ai-, 
laid out by the selectmen, beginning at a point on the northerly 
side of Mechanic street, between the houses of Mrs. A. M, 
Newman and J. H. Cooleclge, and running northerly to Spring 
street, across land of J. H. Cooledge and E. T. Harmon, and 
raise money for the same. — — ----.-., ..... 

Art. 57. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Davis street, beginning at 
a point on the southerly side of the county road leading through 
Libby's Corner, distant about 100 feet south-easterly from the 
school house lot and running south-westerly to the P. & O. R. 
R. location, and raise money to build the same.. 

Art. 58. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Sewall street, beginning 

' i ^~ 




82 WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 

at a point on the southerly side of the county road leading 
through Libby's Corner, distant about 352 feet south-easterly 
from the school house lot, thence running south-westerly to the 
P. & O. R. R. location, and raise money to build the same. 

Art. 59. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Hooper street, beginning 
at a point on the easterly side of Davis street, so called, distant 
from the county road about 1,078 feet and running south-easter- 
ly 1,050 feet to the Basin, and raise money to build the same. 

Art. 60. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, beginning at a point on the northerly 
side of Falmouth street, distant 25 feet from the easterly corner 
of land of H. F. Libby, and running north-westerly to Dart- 
mouth street, and raise money to build the same. 

Art. 61. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Leland street, beginning 
at a point on Central avenue, about 290 feet westerly from the 
Plains road, so-called, and running northerly about 800 feet. 

Art. 62. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Best street, beginning at 
a point on Central avenue, about 1,260 feet westerly from the 
Plains road, and running northerly about 500 feet. 

Art. 63. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Richardson, beginning at 
a point on the westerly side line of Leland street, about 245 leet 
northerly from Central avenue, and running westerly to Best 
street. 

Art. 64. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Leonard street, beginning 
at a point on the westerly line of Leland street, about 575 feet 
north from Central avenue, and running westerly to Best street. 
Art. 66. To see what instruction the town will give the 
selectmen in relation to licensing bowling alleys, pool, bagatelle 
or billiard rooms. 

Art. 66. To see if the town will vote to raise money to pay 
bonds coming due this year. 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 83 

Art. 67. To see what time in March the town will vote to 
hold their next annual meeting. 

The selectmen will be in session at their office on Thursday 
Friday and Saturday, February the twenty-seventh and twenty- 
eighth and March first, A. D. 1890, to receive the applications of 
persons claiming the right to vote, and for revising and correcting 
the voting list. 

Given under our hands this twenty-second day of February* 
A. D. 1890. 

LUTHER BRADFORD, ) Selectmen 
ADAM W. WILSON, \ of 
EDWARD L. COBB, ) Peering. 



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20th ANNUAL REPORT J 



OF THE 



UN1G1PAL OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TO- «l OF DEERIH" ■; 



FOR THE 



1 Fiscal Year Ending February 10th, 1891 1 



PORTLAND : 

Harris & Williams, Printers, 

1891. 



^■■■■■•■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■■ IialllltilllllI,llliI1IillllilliiliilllBliiiil,,liliii,,1,i " liil, """ i:S 



20th ANNUAL REPORT 



OF THE 



MUNICIPAL OFFICERS 



OF THE 



TOWN OF DEERING, 



FOR THE 



Fiscal Year Ending February loth, 1891 



PORTLAND : 

Habris & Williams, Printers, 

1891. 



TOWN . OFFICERS, 1890. 



Selectmen, Assessors and Overseers of the Poor: 

Lemuel W. Dyer, Chairman. 

Elb ridge G. Johnson, John H. Blake, George H. Ckocker, 

Gilman G. Lane, Adam W. Wilson, 

Isaac F. Clark, Clerk. 



Town Clerk, 
Treasurer, 
Collector of Taxes, 
Auditor, 



Ferdinand Burnell. 

George W. Ward. 

Fred V. Matthews. 

Charles H. Leighton. 



Superintending School Committee: 

Reuel Small, Chairman. 

George B. Leavitt, George W. Johnson, Daniel W. Hawkes, 

Clinton A. Woodbury, Samuel A. Packard, 

Fred E. C Robbins, Secretary. 



Supervisor of Schools, 

George H. Bailey, 
George M. Adams, 



Fred E. C Robbins. 



Truant Officers: 



Chauncy R. Berry, 
Charles I. Riggs. 



Daniel D. Cheuery, 
Henry B. Webb, 
Chauncy R. Berry, 
John H. Morton, 
Elias Milton Jacobs, 
Geo. Byron Stevens, 



Constables : 
John B. Smith, 
Charles C. Tolraan, 
Clarence L. Dresser, 
Grenville M. Steven! 
George H. Bailey, 

Board of Health : 



John T. Winslow, 
Frank Floyd, 
George L. Mara ton, 
Vincent C. Mountfort, 
Bertis L. Parkrnan, 
Leander M. Clark. 



Albion P. Topliff, M. D., Chairman. 
Leonard B. Chapman. Andrew Hawes, Secretary. 



Representative to Legislature, 



Andrew Hawes. 



Deering was taken from Westbrook, and incorporated February 16, 1871. 
Westbrook taken from Falmouth, and incorporated by the name of Stroudwater. 
February 14, 1814, and in June of same year changed to Westbrook, in honor of 
Col. Thomas Westbrook. Falmouth was incorporated in 1718. 



Report of Selectmen, Assessors and 
Overseers of Poor. 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Deering : 

We herewith submit our Report, with statement of Receipts and 
Expenditures, for the year ending February 10th, 1891 : 

ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

The appropriation for roads and bridges was $8,000. It has been 
the desire of the Board not to exceed this appropriation. We have 
built Scamman and Chestnut streets at a cost of about $150; two 
culverts on Riverside road at a cost of $275. The culvert near 
Hamblet's brick yard we did not deem it necessary to build this year. 
The culvert at Wm. Lucas's should be built in the near future. The 
ledge on Read street, near Chas. Goodridge's house, we viewed and 
think it proper, if the town wants it blasted out, to make a special 
appropriation ; and in our opinion it will cost $2,500 to do a good 
job. We have paid out about $100 for hauling stone to the crasher, 
which remains to be crushed for future use. 

NEW STREETS. 

The following new streets, which were accepted at the last annual 
town meeting, have been built : West, Grant and Scamman streets, 
and Chestnut street, which was accepted at a former meeting. Ce- 
dar street has been widened, and damages paid as awarded in each 
case. 

STROUDWATER BRIDGE. 

The Board let the contract for the iron bridge to the Berlin Iron 
Bridge Co., for $1,600, and the contract for stone work to R. D. 
Shannahan, for $2,625, and other bills amounting to $199.55, amount- 
ing in all to $4,424.55. The appropriation was $4,500. We moved 
the abutments down the stream about five feet and raised the road- 
bed two and one-half feet. 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 



SEWER. 



The sewer was built as instructed by vote of the town. The con- 
tract for excavation, filling and box was let to Eugene McGillicuddy, 
and the pipe furnished by Winslow & Co. and laid under the su- 
pervision of Usley & Cummings, civil engineers, and accepted by 
them. The assessment was made on the abutters for two-thirds of 
the cost, which seems large on account of the long box across the 
flats, and large size of pipe in Forest avenue, for the benefit of other 
streets, and we refer the matter of assessment to the town for their 
action. The cost of the sewer was $5,493.77, and amount raised by 
loan, $5,500. 

ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 

The largest number of inmates at any one time was nine, and 
the smallest number was seven, average number, eight ; there have 
been no deaths, and very little sickness; one has been sent to the 
Insane Asylum. We have built a new shed 20x30 feet, shingled the 
barn, built two new hay racks, and made other repairs ; the buildings 
are in a comfortable condition; the farming operations and stock 
kept, have been in view of home supply ; the receipts have been 
lessened by the vote of the town not to sell gravel; the farm, under 
the care of Wm. H. Irish and his capable wife, has been managed 
to the satisfaction of the Board ; Mr. Irish has shown a great deal 
of prudence and ability in the management of the farm and we 
cheerfully recommend them to the town and future Board of Select- 
men. 

OUT DOOR POOR. 

Owing to a bill contracted for the support of Chas. H. Doughty, 
in the year 1889, which had a settlement in the town of Deering, 
this town had to pay the bills to the town of Minot, which were large 
for the year 1889. You will see by the report that we have due from 
Chas. E. Jack about $260, for which his property is liable, and we 
have placed an attachment ; also due from Minot about $75, for sup- 
plies furnished the Berry family. 

HYDRANTS. 

The town by a vote at the last annual meeting voted for four hy- 
drants ; two on Spring Street, one near Elisha Higgins' house and 



REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 5 

one near A. S. Wenworth's ; one on Saunders Street and one on 
Prospect Street. We now have 59 hydrants, 50 hydrants at $50 
each, and 9 at $30 each, making a total cost of $2,770. 

ELECTRIC LIGHTS. 

We have located the light voted by the town near Mrs. W. H. 
Kenney's residence on Forest Avenue, making twenty-five lights 
that we are now paying for. 

TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. 

The appropriation was $600, and we have expended $530, leaving 
a balance in favor of the town of $70. 

HOSE COMPANIES. 
The town voted at the last annual meeting to pay $50 to each 
organized Company, not to exceed seven ; four Companies have re- 
turned their organization and drawn six months' pay to Sept. 1, 
amounting to $100. 

We recommend the following amounts for the ensuing year : 

Roads and Bridges, $8,000 

Discount on Taxes, . 1,400 

Alms House and Farm, 500 

Town Officers, « 2,000 

Out Door Poor, 1,000 

Snow Bills, 600 

Interest, 6,000 

Commissions and abatements, 800 

Portland Water Co., 2,800 

Engine House at Woodfords, 150 
Sprinkling Streets, Deering Bridge to M. C. Depot Woodfords, 300 

Board of Health, 100 

Electric Lights, 2,400 

Burying Grounds, 100 

Lemuel W. Dyer, 
Elbridge G. Johnson, George H. Crocker, 
John H. Blake, Adam W. Wilson, 

Gilman G. Lane, Isaac F. Clark, 

Selectmen of Deering . 



TAXES ASSESSED. 



TAXES ASSESSED, 1890. 



Deficiencies. 



For State Tax $5,829 79 

County Tax 2,760 00 

Roads and Bridges 8,000 00 $2,000 00 

Support of Schools 6,800 00 

Text Books 2,000 00 

Interest 6,000 00 

School House Repairs 800 00 900 00 

Discount on Taxes 1,200 00 

Alms House and Farm. 1,000 00 1,800 00 

Town Officers , 2,000 00 1,200 00 

Snow Bills 300 00 150 00 

Out Door Poor 1,000 00 250 00 

Commissions and Abatements 600 00 

High School 2,000 00 

Portland Water Co., as per contract 2,400 00 

Incidentals 1,200 00 900 00 

Burying Ground 100 00 

Engine House at Woodfords 100 00 

Sprinkling Streets 300 00 

Board of Health 150 00 260 00 

Electric Lights 1,300 00 

Stone Crusher 250 00 

Town House Ledge 600 00 350 00 

Award for 1 anjil damages, continuation Grant St. 600 00 

Building Grant street 150 00 

Award for land damages for West street 600 00 

Building West street 50 00 

Award for land damage for Cedar street 44 00 

Heating Morrill's Corner school houses 800 00 

Finishing off Libby's Corner school house 800 00 

Fire Company 350 00 

Saunders street hydrant 30 00 

Two hydrants on Spring street. 60 00 

Award for Town Landing, near Bedford St. . . 10 00 
Hydrant on Prospect street 30 00 

$49,963 79 $8,060 00 

49,963 79 

$58,023 79 

Overlay 376 69 

Supplementary Tax 109 26 

$58,509 74 



VALUATION. 

VALUATION, 1890. 

Real Estate, Resident $1,824,520 00 

Personal Estate, Resident 398,030 00 

Real Estate, Non-Resident 591,060 00 

•Personal Estate, Non-Resident. 30,710 00 

Supplementary 3,540 00 

Total Valuation |2,848,4G0_q 

Tax on Real and Personal Estate, at $1.90 on $100. . . $54,053 48 
" " Supplementary.. 07 26 

1,338 Polls, at $3.00 each 4,014 00 

14 Supplementary Polls, at $3.00 each 42 00 

333 Dogs, at $1.00 each 333 00 



$58,509 74 



Report of Selectmen, 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Deering : 

We herewith submit for your consideration a statement of the 
Receipts and Expenditures of the Town, for the year ending Feb. 
12, 1890 : 

Board of Health, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 

Roads and Bridges, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 

Stone Crusher, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 

Town Officers, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 

School House Repairs, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 



Alms House and Farm, Amount expended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance against town, 

Hose House and Carriages, Amount expended, 

[Balance, 1889, 

Balance against town, $1 21 



$260 00 
254 33 






$ 5 67 


$2,000 00 
1,724 55 






$275 45 


$250 00 
247 09 






$ 2 91 


$1,200 00 
1,183 35 






$16 65 


$900 00 
818 26 






$81 74 




$382 42 


$2,299 91 
1,800 00 






$499 91 


$2 10 
89 





ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 



Incidentals, Amount expended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance against town, 

Out Door Poor, Amount expended, 

Appropriation and receipts, 

Balance against town, t 

Snow Bills, Amount expended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance against town, 

Town House Ledge, Amount expended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance against town, 



Balance against town, 
Balance in favor of town, 

Total balance against town, 



$1,400 28 
900 00 



$1,093 87 
422 96 



$238 64 
150 00 



$371 00 
350 00 



$1,781 95 
382 42 



$500 28 



$670 91 



$88 64 



$2100 
$1,781 95 



$1,399 83 



Dr. ALMS HOUSE AND FARM, 1889. Cb. 

To balance 1889 acct., $1,632 09 By appropriation, $1,800 00 

amount expended, 667 82 balance to new acct., 499 91 

$2,299 91 $2,299 91 

To balance, $499 91 

Harry S. Jones, labor and supplies $ 102 72 

M. C. Libby, " 15 00 

Fannie-S. Davis, " 6 00 

H. J. Bailey & Co., paper 2 66 

Patrons Cooperative Co., supplies 34 26 

Mrs. E. L. Libby, labor 77 00 

H. H. Higgins, blacksmithing ' 52 44 

T. F. Foss and Sons, supplies 2 89 

J. E. Purinton, " 2 71 

H.B.Webb, " 3 40 

Walter Fickett, grain 12 08 

A. H. Mason, use of boar 8 00 

Mary Curran, labor 3 00 



10 BOARD OF HEALTH, ETC. 

W. H. Irish, tickets and expenses 4 88 

J. R. Corey, attending funeral 5 00 

O. JB\ Gilpatrick, carrying pauper to Alms House , . 1 00 

C. E. Burnell, supplies 26 43 

J). P. Higgins, blacksmithing ..:.:.. 17 05 

E. C. Chase, supplies : l 90 

F. H. Johnson, coal 64 23 

A. M. Parker, prof, services .* 107 50 

Roscoe S. Davis & Co., furniture 7 50 

James Parker, supplies 16 46 

C. H. Leighton, prof, services 3 00 

Andrew Hawes, grain 37 33 

Plummer & Wheeler, supplies : 15 00 

Eastman Bros & Bancroft, supplies 5 55 

J. E. Traf ton, labor and oil 15 70 

State Publishing Association, advertising 50 

Cummings Bros, mclse J 5 11 

Royal Leighton, 1 52 

$067 82 



Dr. BOARD OF HEALTH, 1889. Cr. 

To balance, $120 04 By appropriation, $260 00 

amount expended, 134 29 

balance, 5 67 



$260 00 $260 00 

By balance, $5 67 

Geo. P. Sherwood, executive officer $ 70 54 

A. P. Topliff, services 25 00 

A. M. Parker, medical attendance, James McDonald 13 75 

Andrew Hawes, 1888-89 25 00 

$134 29 



Dr.' HOSE HOUSE AND CARRIAGES, 1889. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2 10 By balance, 



INCIDENTALS, ETC. 



11 



Db. 



INCIDENTALS, 1889. 



Cr. 



To balance, 1889, 

amount expended, 


$442 12 
958 16 


By appropriation, 
balance, 


$900 00 
500 28 


To balance, 


$1,400 28 
$500 28 


$1,400 28 



McLellan, Mosher & Co., check book $ 10 00 

E. C. Jordan, surveying 125 00 

T. F. Foss & Son, table • 2 50 

Portland Water Co., rep. drinking fountain 6 20 

I. L. Elder, prof, service and ex. to Augusta 66 84 

F. O. Bailey & Co., use of safe 18 00 

George Libby, prof, service 3 55 

John T. Winslow, services as constable 4 00 

John Scanlan, labor and supplies 29 60 

N. & JEL B. Cleaves, prof, services 317 00 

Godfrey Blockenger, tax refunded 2 89 

John H. Read, trucking hose carts 2 00 

D. D. Chenery, notifying town meeting, for drawing jurors 27 00 

Stevens & Jones, supplies for town office 9 39 

W. H. Motley, postage 3 59 

Harris & Williams, printing reports and notices 195 00 

G. Jeffords, straps for hose carts . 1 25 

Luther Bradford, expenses to Augusta 4 50 

Edward Campbell, labor on stranger's lot 3 00 

L. M. Clark, services as constable 21 00 

Lane, Burnham & Co., screen doors 6 00 

G. G. Lane, putting up street signs and posts 15 25 

F. Burnell, recording 3 75 

John McClenan, carrying town reports 50 

F. H. Johnson, coal and wood 16 85 

Lewis Shaw, sweeping and tending fires at town house 7 50 

Evergreen Cemetery Grading 56 00 



$958 16 



Dr. 

To amount expended, 
balance, 



To balance, 



OUT DOOR POOR, 1889. 



$1,032 23 
61 64 



Cr. 



$1,093 87 
$670 91 



By appropriation, $250 00 

rec'ts, town Westbr'k, 146 61 

" Windham, 26 35 

balance, 670 91 



$1,093 87 



J. H. Clark, rent to Geo. A. Collins $ 36 00 

Mrs. E. C. Thorpe, board of Casender Cram 10 00 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies to Mrs. Coffee 26 85 

24 83 

M. W. Best, rent to W. P. Berry 24 99 



12 TOWN OFFICERS. 

Town of Westbrook, supplies furnished Thomas Decker, and rent 

to Mrs. Merrill 104 31 

J. H. Purinton, supplies to Mrs. Lang 9 49 

D. B. Libby 5 03 

" " Green 2 19 

A. F. Mann, rent to Mrs. Hinkley 10 00 

Edward Gould, rent to Mrs. Lang - 15 00 

Thomas Qualey, rent to James McDonald 10 00 

Walter Fickett, supplies to G. F. Milliken 29 67 

E. J. Hersey, rent to Mrs. Lunt 35 00 

Maine Insane Hospital, board of Louise S. Marriner 38 95 

Town of Gray, supplies furnished W. F. Green and wife 23 78 

C. W. Foster, medical attendance G. F. Milliken 13 00 

Collins family 2175 

A. M. Parker, " " J. A. Coffee's family 41 25 

V. H. SouLe, milk to J. A. Coffee's family 20 52 

Royal Leighton, supplies to " " 34 91 

D. H. Hamilton, board of Bickforcl child 2 00 

James Parker, supplies to Kate Paine 11 99 

" Mrs. Dyke 5 95 

"Hinkley 12 64 

F. H. Johnson, coal to W. P. Berry 6 00 

" " Kate McCarty 6 00 

" " and wood 67 50 

J. L. Watson, coal & wood to Mrs. Green & coal to Mrs. Lang 8 15 

H. J. Allen, supplies to Mrs. Fields 4 72 

FredWhyley, " " Susan Lunt 16 79 

Chas. Murphy, " " Geo. C. Collins 9 88 

Town of Minot, supplies to C. H. Doughty 303 45 

A. Dingley, " James McDonald 3199 

Royal Leighton, " " Mrs. Lang 7 65 

$1,032 23 



Dr. TOWN OFF 

To balance from 1889, $142 52 
amount expended, 1,040 83 
balance, 16 65 


[CERS, 1889. 

By appropriation, 

By balance, 


Dr. 

$1,200 00 


$1,200 00 


$1,200 00 
$16 65 



F. E. C. Robbins, bal. of salary $ 73 33 

Geo. B. Leavitt, assessor, and horse hire 219 50 

E. L. Cobb, selectman, assessor, and horse hire 365 00 

Andrew Hawes, assessor, and horse hire \ 120 00 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



13 



A. W. Wilson, selectman 103 00 

Luther Bradford, " 117 00 

F. Burnell, bal. of salary 15 50 

Chas. H. Leighton, services as auditor 20 75 

Andrew Hawes, expenses and labor before the valuation com- 
mission at Augusta i 6 75 

$1,040 83 



Dr. 



ROADS AND BRIDGES, 1889. 



To balance, 

amt. expended, 
balance, 



$755 62 
968 93 
275 45 

$2,000 00 



By appropriation, 



By balance, 



Or. 
$2,000 00 

$2,000 00 

$275 45 



C. L. Knight, labor, $25 15 

W. E. Knight, " 1 50 

Portland Sp'klng Co., ashes, 93 25 
Cyrus Thurlow Est., labor, 4 50 
J. W. Smith, " 13 00 

John McCarthy, " 1 50 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies, 2 20 
James R. Lunt, 1887, mat, 10 00 
Thomas McOafferty, labor, 21 37 

C. B. Abbott, supplies, ma- 
terial and labor, 17 22 

G.H.Cobb, " 16 00 

Fred Blockenger, labor, 2 25 

D. P. Higgins, lab. & sup. 30 60 
Moses McKenney, 1884 & '87, 9 74 
H. B. Webb, supplies, 3 25 
H. H. Davis, labor, 8 75 
Thomas W. Jackson, '87, lab. 8 00 
C. H. Davis, labor, 3 75 
Andrew Hawes, supplies, 8 25 
Amos Abbott, labor, 108 00 
Frank Osgood, " 75 
A. P. Chapman, labor, 7 50 
A. M. Cdbb, " 4 90 
Chas. McCarthy, 1884, labor, 2 62 
A. L. Richardson, lab. & gvl. 53 25 
James McDonald, " 9 00 
Chas. Fickett, " 6 75 
Joseph Sawyer, " 1 88 
Daniel Ward, " 2 70 
Frank Desmond, " 5 50 
J. P. Shattuck, " 18 55 
LeGrow Bros, lumber, 33 10 
H. H. Higgins, blacksmith' g, 27 65 
Geo. H. Chapman, labor, 3 75 
Geo. Adams, " 4 37 
C. S. Bates, " 11 25 
Manis Boyce, 75 
Chas. Gordon, " 1 50 



John S. Sawyer, labor 10 00 

Albert Chesley, " 14 00 

A. P. Cotton, " 10 24 

Daniel Mayberry, " 30 00 

Fred Waterhouse, " 5 25 

E. L. Milliken, blacksmithing, 4 25 

F. F. Milliken, labor, 
John A. Smith, " 

G. G. Lane, " 
Spiller Bros, blacksmithing, 
Plummer & Wheeler, tools, 



W. S. Berry, labor, 

Geo. S. Berry, 

James Parker, 

David Jones, 

Eli K. Huston, 

D. H. Hamilton, 

R. F. Rowe, 

J. F. Knight, 

A. G. Gould, 

Walter Pennell, 

Abner Lowell, 

Sumner Libby, stone chips, 

A. F. Minot, labor, 

Isaiah Elder, crowbars & lab 



6 00 
15 25 
100 
135 
6 85 

50 20 

51 75 
3 30 
2 25 

13 25 
5 25 

12 00 
5 00 

10 50 

2 55 
1 13 

3 60 
42 66 
. 3 40 



J. E. Trafton, labor, 6 50 

Simeon Tracy, " 7 50 

L. II. Milliken, '87 & '89, lab. 10 50 
S. Worster, stone chips, 

and labor 
Lewis Shaw, labor, 
D. Dole, Jr. " 
Portland St. S. Co. Ashes, 
A. L. Leighton, labor, 
S. S. Morse, 
J. E. Skillings, 



6 00 


3 60 


5 50 


is, 27 25 


1 00 


1 50 


6 50 


$968 93 



14 SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, ETC. 

Dr. SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, 1887-'89. Cr; 

To bal. 1887 & 1889 acct., $765 20 By appropriation, $900 00 

amount expended, 53 06 

balance, 81 74 

$900 00 $900 00 

By balance, $81 74 

Plummer & Wheeler, labor and material $ 46 81 

H. K. Johnson, repairing lock 1 25 

James Lucas, labor 5 00 

$53 06 



Dr. 



STONE CRUSHER, 1889. 



To amount expended, 
balance, 1889, 



$4 50 

242 59 

2 91 

$250 00 



By appropriation 



By balance, 



Lane & Burnham, labor on crusher. 



Cr. 

$250 00 

$250 00 
$2 91 

$4 50 



Dr. 

To amount expended, 
balance, 



To balance, 

L. E. Emerson, 
Thomas W. Jackson, 
D. P. Higgins, 
L. B. Smith, 
J. P. Shattuck 
Lauriston Rumery, 
Wm. England, 
John Welch, 
Chas. Pickett, 
Geo. McKenney, 
W. S. Berry, 



SNOW BILLS, 1889. Cr. 

$139 40 By appropriation, $150 00 

99 24 balance, 88 64 

_ $238 64 $238 64 
$88 64 

labor $ 2 00 

- • • • - 28 00 

" 1350 

" 150 

" • 2 40 

" 7 00 

" 2 25 

" 3 00 

" 6 00 

" 2 25 

" 2 25 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. 15 

P. S. Millett, labor 75 

David Jones, " 4 00 

David Jones, for Caroline Jones, labor .', 1 05 

A. H. Leighton, labor , • • i • • • 150 

Andrew Hawes, " 2 50 

W. S. & G. S. Berry, " - 15 25 

Cbas. E. Pride, " 195 

J. H. Leighton, " 5 55 

Daniel Dole, Jr. " 4 00 

W. S. Buck, " . 1 50 

S. Worster, " 3 50 

Pat Flynn, " 10 00 

Isaiah Elder, " 2 90 

E. M. Thomes, " '...'.' 10 50 

Ohas. L. Knight, " 4 30 



$139 40 



Dr. SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS, 1889. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2,648 60 By balance, 1889, $2,835 86 

balance to new acct., 187 26 



$2,835 86 $2^83586 

By balance, $187 26 

Grace Read, teaching , . . . , . : $ 97 20 

Mary E. Whittier, care of school house 13 75 

Mary E. Whittier, teaching 88 00 

C. W. Pierce, janitor 13 50 

M.E.Elder, teaching ■■■{■■■ HO 00 

H.L.Chase, " 99 00 

Myra L. Elder, " '. . . ., 99 Oo 

Isabel Jordan, " 88 00 

Carrie E. Vanhorn, " 66 00 

Geo. P. Seal, labor and material 11 00 

S. P. Kimball, teaching 88 00 

Hattie J. Loring, " 99 00 

P. A. Libby, cleaning vaults 17 50 

Nellie L. Morrison, teaching 99 00 

John G. Connor, cleaning vaults 6 00 

Mrs. James Edgar, care of school house 16 50 

Scott P. Starbird, janitor, and repairs 12 00 

Elma E. Adams, janitor, and snow shovels 54 70 

Rice Bros., supplies , . 80 

Lizzie B. Cobb, teaching 99 00 



16 TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. 

J. S. Sawyer, janitor 22 00 

L. S. Anderson, teaching 132 00 

Anna V. Hunt, " : 99 00 

H. V. Elder, " '. 99 00 

Lucy J. Goddard, " 72 00 

R. W. Leland, " 110 00 

Fannie E. Hopkinson, " 88 00 

Mary A. Elwell, " , 110 00 

E. F. Maxiield, " 88 00 

Plurnmer & Wheeler, labor and material 8 85 

Wm. Westwood & Co., wood 2 00 

F. F. Milliken, janitor 27 50 

F. H. Knight, " 10 00 

Edwards & Walker, supplies 2 50 

H. B. Webb, labor and material 9 11 

W. 1ST. Chenery, janitor 16 50 

Stevens & Jones, supplies 4 07 

Ralph W. Emerson, janitor 11 00 

Hiram C. Hawkes, teaching 166 66 

J. L. Rice, pail 40 

W. C. Merrill, janitor, and sweeping 33 25 

Jane R. Hale, teaching 72 00 

Prentiss Loring, insurance 15 00 

Joseph Ross, janitor 22 70 

J.A.Webber, " and setting glass ' 18 00 

Jane McGovern, washing school house 2 00 

C. H. Pike, wood 1 88 

S. A. Packard, pail and dipper 75 

J. L. Watson, wood 1 75 

H. J. Bailey & Co., shades, fixtures, &c 13 03 

John Dole, janitor 18 65 

Walter Fickett, trucking wood 1 00 

S. L. Chubbuck, teaching 132 00 

LeGrow Bros., lumber 80 

F. H. Johnson, coal and wood • 4 25 

A. P. Stockwell, teaching 55 00 

$2,648 60 



Dr. TOWN HOUSE LEDGE, 1889. Cr. 

To amount expended, $22 00 By appropriation, $350 00 

balance, 349 00 balance, 21 00 



$371 00 $371 00 

By balance, $21 00 
Stewart Worster, labor and material $ 22 00 



Report of Selectmen 



To the Inhabitants of the Town of Deering : 

We herewith submit for your consideration a statement of the 

Receipts and Expenditures of the Town, for the year ending Feb. 
10, 1891 : 

Town Farm, Receipts and Appropriation, $2,404 84 

Amount expended, 1,636 56 

Balance in favor of town, $768 28 

Roads and Bridges, Receipts and Appropriation, $8,025 25 

Amount expended, 7,916 38 

Balance in favor of town, $108 87 

Incidentals, Receipts and Appropriation, $1,320 00 

Amount expended, 868 00 



Balance in favor of town, $452 00 

Engine House, Woodfords, Appropriation, $100 00 

Amount expended, bal. '89, 83 83 

Balance in favor of town, $16 17 

Town Officers, Appropriation, $2,000 00 

Amount expended, 1,737 30 

Balance in favor of town, $262 70 

Town House Ledge, Appropriation. $600 00 

Amount expended, 530 00 

Balance in favor of town, $70 00 

Stroudwater Bridge, By loan, $4,500 00 

Amount expended, 4,424 55 

Balance in favor of town, $75 45 

Sewer, By loan (bonds issued), $5,500 00 

Amount expended, 5,493 77 

Balance in favor of town, $ 6 23 



18 REPORT OF SELECTMEN. 

West Street, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $ .65 

Burying Grounds, Appropriation, and balance '89, 
Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $ 5 11 

Board of Iiealth, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 



$650 00 
649 35 


$104 27 
99 16 


$150 00 
8 10 



Balance in favor of town, $141 90 

Hose Companies, Appropriation, $350 00 

Amount expended, 100 00 



Balance in favor of town, $250 00 

Portland Water Co., Appropriation and balance, 
Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $158 26 

Grant Street, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $22 60 

Electric Lights, Appropriation and balance, 
Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $225 00 

Snow Bills, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $16 19 

High School, Appropriation and receipts, 
Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, $624 68 

School House Repairs, Appropriation, $800 00 

Amount expended, 579 33 



$2,928 26 
2,770 00 


$750 00 
727 40 


$2,700 00 
2,475 00 


$300 00 
283 81 


$2,586 27 
1,961 59 



Balance in favor of town, $220 67 

Support of Schools, Appropriation, $9,808 48 

Amount expended, 6,479 38 



Balauce in favor of town, $3,329 10 

Text Books, Appropriation, $2,000 00 

Amount expended, 1,793 19 

Balance in favor of town, $206 81 



ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 19 

Libby Corner School House, Appropriation, $800 00 

Amount expended, 725 80 

Balance in favor of town, 

Morrill Corner School House, Appropriation, 

Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 

Commissions and Abatements, Receipts, app'n, sup. 

tax and overlay, 
Amount expended, 

Balance in favor of town, 



Discount on Taxes, Amount expended, 
Appropriation, 

Balance against the town, 

Out Door Poor, Amount expended, 

Appropriation and receipts, 

Balance against the town, $265 11 





$74 20 


$800 00 
780 00 






$20 00 


$2,816 55 
2,578 28 






$238 27 




$7,293 14 


$1,367 82 
1,275 66 






$92 16 


$1,503 15 
1,238 04 





$357 27 



Balance in favor of town, $7,293 14 

Balance against the town, 357 27 

Total balance in favor of town, $6,935 87 



Dr. ALMS HOUSE AND FARM, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $1,636 56 By appropriation, $1,000 00 

balance to new acct., 768 28 receipts, 1,404 84 

$2,404 84 $2,404 84 

By balance, $768 28 

LeGrow Bros., lumber $ 102 69 

W. H. Irish, supplies 636 09 

F. H. Johnson, coal 34 29 

W. H. Irish, salary as keeper, to Feb. 17, 1891 375 00 

Lane & Burnham, carpentering 52 68 

Elbridge Matthews, grain 224 35 

Kate Bangs, labor in house 68 00 



20 BOARD OF HEALTH, ETC. 

C. H. Jones, labor and material on windmill 4 00 

A. W. Berry, coal 8 39 

King & Dexter, tools and nails 6 25 

Geo. H. McKenney, labor on farm 88 80 

Chas. W. Foster, certificate for A. Stevens. 5 00 

John Scanlan, blacksmithing 7 67 

H. B. Bennett, marking iron 2 00 

H. J. Allen, supplies 3 35 

C. H. Leigliton, vet. surgeon 3 00 

J. L. Snwyer, wood 15 00 

$1,636 56 



Dr. BOARD OF HEALTH, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $ 8 10 By appropriation, $150 00 

balance, 141 90 



_ $150_00 $150 00 

By balance, $141 90 

Andrew Hawes, printing, advertising and postage •$ 8 10 



Dr. BURYING GROUNDS, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $99 16 By appropriation,' $100 00 

balance, 5 11 balance, 4 27 

$104 27 $104 27 

By balance, $5 11 

E. L. Milhken, labor $ 75 

L. B. Chapman, bills paid 1890 3 70 

Chas. Fickett, " and rake 22 25 

G. M. Soule, lumber 13 70 

Rufus Deering & Co., cedar posts 28 56 

A. W. Wilson, trucking lumber 5 75 

Elbridge G. Bailey, building fence 24 45 

$99 16 



Dr. CEDAR STREET. Cr. 

To amount expended, $44 00 By appropriation, $44 00 

Edward Logue, award for land damage $44 00 



COMMISSIONS AND ABATEMENTS, ETC. 21 

Dr. COMMISSIONS AND ABATEMENTS. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2,578 28 By balance, $ 162 11 

balance, 238 27 appropriation, 600 00 

R. B. and Tel. tax, 1,568 49 

Overlay, 376 69 

Sup. Tax, 109 26 

$2,816 55 ^$2,816_55 

To balance, $238 27 

Fred V. Matthews, collector, balance commissions, 1889 $ 119 95 

G. M. Stevens, abatement for 1884 and '85 : . . . 212 03 

Fred V. Matthews, abatement for 1889 441 54 

" 1890 627 79 

" 1888 78 04 

" commissions," 1890 876 00 

Daniel D. Chenery, abatements, 1880, '81 and '82 32 93 

Fred V. Matthews, " 1889 108 00 

1890 76 00 

Elias M. Jacobs, " 1883 6 00 

$2,578 28 



Dr. DISCOUNT ON TAXES. Cr. 

To amount expended, $1,367 82 



$1,367 82 


By balance, 1889, 
appropriation, 
balance, 


$ 75 m 

1,200 00 
92 16 


$1,367 82 

$92 16 


$1,367 82 



To balance, 

Fred V. Matthews, collector, discount on taxes, 1890 .$1,367 82 

Dr. ELECTRIC LIGHTS, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $2,475 00 By appropriation, $1,300 00 

balance, 225 00 balance, 1889, 1,400 00 



$2,700 00 JS2,700_00 

By balance, $225 00 

Westbrook Electric Lights, as per contract $2,475 00 



22 ENGINE HOUSE, WOODFOBDS, ETC. 



Dr. ENGINE HOUSE : 


, WOODFORDS. 


Cr. 


To amount expended, 


$ 72 00 


By appropriation, 


$100 00 


balance, 1889, 


11 83 






balance, 


16 17 








$100 00 


$100 00 






By balance, 


$16 17 


L. G. Eldridge, care of 


engine house, 


and labor 


....$ 72 00 



Dr. GRANT STREET. Cr. 

To amount expended, $727 40 By appropriation, $750 00 

balance, 22 60 

$750 00 $750 00 

By balance, $22 60 

11. D. Hollis, labor $ 4 00 

Charles E. Pride 3 00 

L. J. Perkins, land damage for extension Grant street 600 00 

Wm. Ross 7 20 

Pat Morgan 10 40 

Clinton- Mosher 5 00 

LeGrow Bros., lumber 3 45 

Charles F. Pride, labor 8 00 

Portland Water Co., powder .and fuse 10 70 

Warren M. Lowe, labor. . . 15 37 

Isaiah Elder 52 78 

Edwin Campbell 1 50 

$727 40 



Dr. HEATING MORRILL'S COR. SCHOOL HOUSE. Cr. 

To amount expended, $780 00 By appropriation, $800 00 

balance, 20 00 

$800 00 $800 00 

By balance, $20 00 

Order drawn in favor of School Committee $780 00 



HIGH SCHOOL, ETC. 23 

Dr. HIGH SCHOOL, 1889-'90. Ce. 

To amount expended, $1,961 59 By balance, $401 27 

balance, 624 68 appropriation, 2,000 00 

rec'd from State, '90, 125 00 

$2,586 27 $2,586 27 

By balance, $024 68 

Charlotte Montgomery, teaching $ 90 00 

Helen J. Webster, " 150 00 

E. H. Crosby, ' ? 212 82 

W. C. Merrill, sweeping 875 

C W. Pierce, janitor : 18 00 

H. B. Webb, labor 75 

Plummer & Wheeler, labor 3 50 

Harris & Williams, printing 2 60 

Orders drawn in favor of the school committee, for 1890 1475 17 

$1961 59 



To amount expended, 
balance, 


$100 00 
250 00 


By appropri 




$350 00 


By balance, 



Dr. HOSE COMPANIES. Cr. 

II. $350 00 



$35000 
$250 00 



Hose Co. No. 4, Allen's Corner, services to Sept, 1, 1890 $ 25 00 

1, Woodford's " " " 25 00 

5, East Deering, " " 25 00 

3, Morrill's Corner, " " 25 00 



$100 00 



Dr. INCIDENTALS, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $868 00 By appropriation, $1,200 00 

balance, 452 00 receipts, 120 00 



$1,320 00 _$1,320 00 

By balance, $452 00 

Portland Post Oflice, envelopes $ 4 36 

I. F. Clark, telegram 50 



24 INCIDENTALS. 

Loring, Short & Harmon, supplies for office 4 03 

F. V. Matthews, taking polls, etc 76 05 

Stevens & Jones, supplies for office ... 12 00 

L. M. Clark, pencil and pens 2 50 

F. V. Matthews, notifying town meetings 30 00 

C. O. Barrows, typewriting 2 75 

G. W. Furlong, taxes illegally assessed 12 60 

E. C. Jorclon, surveying 36 00 

A. E. Skillings, " 2 00 

L. M. Clark, constable duty, and notifying to draw jurors 13 00 

G. L. Marston, " *■ handcuffs*. : 34 50 

D. D. Clough, bookcase, and removing tree 5 00 

F. G. Stevens, taking mortgages and shipping list 30 00 

Eastern Argus, advertising 17 25 

C. R. Berry, constable duty, and notifying to draw jurors 16 00 

Harris & Williams, stationery 18 00 

Portland Publishing Co., notices 18 50 

F. E. Bailey, painting and lettering signs 15 00 

F. Burnell, recording births and deaths 16 98 

Stevens & Jones, paper 4 50 

McLellan & Mosher, printing bonds 30 00 

W. A. Allen, street signs 9 60 

O. F. Gilpatrick, horse hire 1 50 

Portland Steam Packet Co., freight 1 50 

G. M. Donham, Maine Register 1 50 

Charles Paine, printing 8 50 

L. M. Watson, painting Lewis Ha'll 10 00 

S. S. Morrill, postage 2 00 

L. M. Clark, constable 2 00 

Howard Gould, check book 1 00 

J. H. Coffin, insurance, town house 22 50 

Loring, Short & Harmon, stationery 2 37 

John T. Winslow, constable 12 00 

King & Dexter, scales 3 00 

A. W. Wilson, trucking hose 2 50 

C. A. Woodbury* services as moderator 25 00 

Fred V. Matthews, notifying meeting 17 00 

G. G. Lane, labor and material, street signs 18 50 

J. L. Watson, coal 3 15 

Niles C. Johnson, constable 8 00 

Y. C. Mountfort, " 17 00 

City of Portland, strangers' lot in Evergreen Cemetery 275 00 

Royal Leighton, lamps, office " 2 00 

LeGrow Bros., lumber, street signs 14 71 

F. H. Johnson, coal and wood 2 15 

C. R. Berry, truant officer 4 00 

$868 00 



ltbby's corner school house, etc. 25 

Dr. LIBBY'S CORNER SCHOOL HOUSE. Cr. 

To amount expended, $725 80 By appropriation, $800 00 
balance, 74 20 

$800 00 $800 00 



By balance, $74 20 

Order drawn in favor of School Committee $725 80 

Dr. OUT DOOR POOR, 1890. Cr. 



To amount expended, 


$1,503 15 


By appropriation, 
receipts, 
balance, 


$1,000 00 
238 04 
265 11 




$1,503 15 


$1,503 15 


To balance, 


$265 11 





M. A. Cram, supplies, Mrs. Jack $ 69 06 

Portland Water Co., water, Mrs. Jack 15 00 

M. O'Connors, supplies, " " 4 47 

E. C. Chase, to George Collins 10 44 

F. H. Johnson, coal, Mrs. Lunt : 15 20 

" Hinkley 8 40 

" Cobb 13 40 

" Jack 6 00 

"■ Berry 5 00 

F. W. Edward, washing, Mrs. Coffee 6 85 

James Parker, supplies, " Hinkley 28 16 

M. W. Best, rent, W. P. Berry 66 64 

James Parker, supplies, Mrs. Lang 59 66 

J. W. C. Roberts " " Coffee 2102 

FredWhyley, " " Lunt 16 83 

E. C. Thorpe, board of Cassander Cram 5 00 

Royal Leighton, supplies, Mrs. Coffee 4 86 

E. C. Thorpe, board of Cassander Cram 15 00 

A. W. Wilson, expenses to Minot, Doughty case 4 40 

L. M. Clark, " " Augusta, with Ada Stevens 11 00 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies, to Mrs. Jack and Mrs. Coffee 49 69 

City of Portland, board and supplies, of A. P. Mason, Jos. Max- 
well, and C. A . Stevens 24 64 

C. W. Foster, prof, services, Collins family 17 00 

J. H. Clark, house rent, to Geo. A. Collins 20 00 

A.F.Mann, " " " Mrs. Hinkley 5 00 

Town of Jay, supplies, to Lewis Blake 7 00 



26 OUT DOOR POOR. 

Insane Hospital, boaM and supplies, for Ada Stevens and L. P. 

Marriner 43 96 

M. W. Best, rent, to W. P. Berry 16 66 

F. II. Johnson, coal and wood, to Lunt, Collins and Coffee 19 05 

John McClellan, trucking, for Mrs. Hinkley. , 5 00 

J. Parker, supplies, to Collins family 16 02 

C. W. Foster, prof, services, to Mrs. Mary Dow, 22 50 

Andrew Hawes, rent, Barbaskey family — 20 00 

J. C. Bryant, rent and milk, to Mrs. Hinkley 24 97 

J. Parker, supplies, to Mrs. Hinkley 60 59 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies, to Mrs. Jack 4 97 

E. C. Thorpe, board of Cassander Cram 15 00 

E. J. Hersey, rent, to Mrs. Lunt 42 00 

Edward Gould, " " " Lang 15 00 

B. L. Parkman, tickets to Augusta, Low family 10 00 

C. W. York, wood, for Mrs. Lang 1 00 

Fred Whyley, supplies to Susan Lunt , 39 64 

C. R. Berry, on account of B. "W. Ro we 6 80 

G. II. Crocker, services for out door poor 3 00 

J. Parker, supplies, to Merrill, Hinkley, Lang and Blake. 08 81 

State Reform School, board of Wm. Bloome 28 00 

E. C. Thorpe, board of Cassander Cram 5 00 

I. F. Clark, expenses to Minot, Doughty case 9 50 

Y. II. Soule, milk, to Mrs. Coffee ; 12 18 

Edward Gould, rent, to Mrs. Lang 15 00 

E. C. Thorpe, board of Cassander Cram , 5 00 

Maine Insane Hospital, board and supplies 36 36 

C. W. Foster, prof, services 5 00 

J. C. Bryant, rent and supplies, to Mrs Hinkley 10 32 

Town of Minot, aid furnished 0. W. Doughty 159 01 

J. W. C. Roberts, supplies, to Mrs. Coffee , 20 45 

E. J. Hersey, rent, to Mrs. Lunt 35 00 

Mrs. F. W. Edwards, washing and house cleaning, to Mrs. Coffee. 3 95 

State Reform School, board of Wm. Bloome 13 00 

C. R. Berry, cash and ticket for J. E. Coffee 8 50 

Geo. H. Crocker, services, out door poor 1 00 

Mary Cram, supplies to Mrs. Jack 62 08 

L. W. Dyer, expense to Minot, twice 10 20 

Andrew Hawes, rent, Barbasky family 10 00 

J. L. Watson, coal and wood, (O. D. P.) 67 26 

V. H. Soule, milk to Coffee family 10 65 

1,503 15 



PORTLAND STREET SPRINKLING CO., ETC. 



27 



Dr. • PORTLAND STREET SPRINKLING CO. Cr. 

To amount expended, $300 00 By appropriation, $300 00 

Portland Street Sprinkling Co $ 300 00 



Dr. 



PORTLAND WATER CO. 



Cr. 



To amount expended, 
balance, 


$2,770 00 
158 26 . 


By balance, 

appropriation, 

By balance, 


$ 408 26 
2,520 00 


To amount expended, 


$2,928 26 
as per contract . 


$2,928 26 
$158 26 

....$2,770 00 



Dr. 



ROADS AND BRIDGES, 1890. 



Cr. 



To amount expended, 
balance, 



$7,916 38 
108 87 



By appropriation. $8,000 00 

A. F. Berry, Nov. 10, 1 00 







F. A. Libby, " 17, 


175 






A. W. Wilson, June 27, 


1 00 






Fred Jenney, Feb. 9, 


2 50 






E. C. Robinson, loam, 


6 00 






Use of road machine, 


10 00 






O. L. Knowles, loam, 


3 00 




18,025 25 


$8,025 25 






By balance, 


$108 87 


Abbott, Amos labor, 


$78 40 


Cram, O. B. plank, 


5 64 


Alms house & farm tm., 


lab. 440 20 


Chipman, O. G. 


30 90 


Boucher, Fred 


2 00 


Campbell, Edwin 


56 41 


Bickford, L. A. 


13 13 


Clark, Isaac F. 


54 00 


Berry, Geo. S. 


3 00 


Carter, F. C. 


21 91 


Berry, Frank W. 


24 00 


Campbell, 


59 99 


Bragdon, Wm. H. 


31 50 


Cribb, Thomas C. 


61 00 


Britt, Edward 


9 45 


Christainson, C. 


4 37 


Blocklinger, Fred 


6 00 


Cotton, A. P. 


16 50 


Boothby, W. H. 


3 00 


Colley, W. P. 


75 


Bailey, Warren 


67 40 


Casco Carbonized Cement 




Blake, J. H. 


134 87 


Pipe Co., pipe, 


5 04 


Boice, Mann is 


181 88 


Crocker, George H. 


46 95 


Bailey. B. F. 


47 00 


Castle, Richard 


75 


Boothby, Miss Annie M. 18 50 


Dun lap, A. 8. 


6 25 


Bailey, J. E. 


14 00 


Dresser, James L. 


17 25 


Berry, C. R. labor and 


sup., 9 98 


Decoste, Benjamin 


1 50 


Curran, Martin jr. 


128 38 


Davidson, Jerry 


1 50 


Cobb, E. L. 


18 00 


Dyer, L. W. 


33 00 


Capen, Charles 


3 00 


Dole, Daniel Jr. 


8 75 



28 



ROADS AND BRIDGES. 



Dole, W. H. H. 6 00 
Davis, Charles II. 3 75 
Elder, Isaiah 219 66 
Emery, James 13 50 
Elder, Fred 18 61 
Emery & Waterhouse, sup., 2 30 
Evergreen Cemetery, cross- 
walk stone, 13 80 
Flynn, Patrick 1 50 
Fielding, Wm. J. 11 25 
Feeney, Patrick 177 96 
Fickett, Walter 16 12 
Fickett, Charles 53 71 
Flaherty, Patrick 48 62 
Furlong, G. \V. haul'g stone, 13 10 
Gould, Daniel 14 70 
Gould, Herbert 10 20 
Goudy, A. H. 201 77 
Gondy, Thomas 1 50 
Hodgdon & Son, stone, 129 57 
Hollis, R. D. 140 15 
Hawes, Andrew 10 50 
Hodgkins, G. H. 18 38 
Hawkins, L. P. 3 57 
Harris, W. W. 58 00 
Huston, Eli 11 25 
Hawkes, R. C. 10 00 
Hawkes, Walter 13 75 
Irish, Fred 42 15 
Jones, Aug. C. labor & grav., 5 25 
Johnson, E. G. lumber, 6 45 
Jack, Harry 11 48 
Johnson, George 14 50 
Jordan, Mark nails, 82 
Johnson, George W. 32 13 
Johnson, F. H. coal to crush- 
er, and labor, 45 50 
Jones, C. H. 3 95 
Kelley, D. F. supplies, 87 67 
Knowles, O. L. 78 90 
King & Dexter, nails, 2 39 
Kendall & Whitney, tools, 27 25 
Keith, Vesper J. 18 00 
Knight, J. F. 23 25 
Knowles, J. S. 46 25 
Knight, C. L. 21 00 
LeGrow Bros., lumber, 245 76 
Leighton, Royal nails, 9 92 
Libby, Sumner labor and 

stone chips, ' 503 45 

Li b by, Marshall 20 13 

Libby, F. A. 31 35 

Leighton, George F. 3 00 

Leighton, A. H. 9 00 
Leighton, Geo. W. stone chips 2 60 

Leighton, J. H. fi 00 

Lowell, Abner 70 85 

Lowe, R. M. 35 41 

Leavitt, George B. 27 15 



Lane, G. G. labor, lumber 

and nails, 4 

McCann, D. B. 8 

Murphy, Charles 10 
Maine Central R. R., freight, 16 

Mayberry, A. E. 163 

McCarty, John 20 

Man ley, Frank 3 

Mayberry, Daniel 109 

Milliken, H. F. 13 

Morton, Albert 3 

Mosher, Clinton 74 

Mountfort, Fred P. 11 
Minott, A. F. lab. & stone, 104 

Morgan, Patrick 9 

McClellan, John 1 

McKenney, George 5 

Nason, Stephen W. 44 

Nason, Ira D. 18 
Parker, James Lantern, 

Pride, Charles F. 135 

Pride, Charles E. 281 

Pyping, M. 12 
Portland St. S. Co. ashes, 221 

Pollister, C. L. 3 

Pen n ell, Walter 13 

Pride, G. M. 1 
Portland Cement P. Co. pipe, 6 

Qualey, Thomas 45 

Roberts, J. W. C. nails, 2 
Read, D. H. labor, & gravel, 578 

Ross, Wm. 25 

Rumery, Lauriston 63 

Rumery, John 3 

Rowe, R. F. 89 

Rice, J. L. nails 3 

Robinson, E. C. 184 

Richardson, A. L. 16 

Reed, J. H. ill 

Skillin, L. B. 3 

Stockwell, J. W. 6 

ShaAv, I^ewis 88 

Sawyer, John S. 54 

Stray ton, Charles A, 14 

Sawyer, A. 40 

Spear, Albert 56 

Stevens, Michael 29 

Sawyer, John E. 14 

Sands. C.F. 9 

Stevens, Charles F. 1 

Smith, L. 13. il 

Small, Win. IT. Jr. 32 

Scan Ian, John 3 

Swett, Richard G. 91 

Stimson, R. S. 6 

Trafton, J. E. 95 

Tripp, George 27 

Tate, A. 24 

Thomes, E. M. 41 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY. 



29 



Win slow P. Company, pipe, 145 84 
White, beo. W. . 4 50 

Wells, Sidney S. 5 25 

Waterhouse, Fred 75 

Worster, Stewart 123 41 



Wentworth, A. S. 2 25 

Welch, John, 3 00 

Wis well, Harry 6 00 

Wilson, A. W. gvl. & lab. 231 77 



7,916 38 



SCHEDULE OF TOWN PROPERTY 



REAL ESTATE. 

Town Farm, $5,000 00 

Town house and lot, 1,500 00 

Gravel pit, Morrill's, 200 00 

" East Peering 100 00 

" Allen Corner, 300 00 

" Hussey Hill, 50 00 

Land junction of Church 

and Frost streets, 100 00 
Lot and engine house, 

Woodfords, 1,000 00 



$8,250 00 



PERSONAL PROPERTY. 

Stock, Farming Tools, &c, 
at Farm. 

1 pair horses. $325 00 
Blankets and robes, 7 00 

3 cows, 85 00 

2 Hogs, 20 00 
52 hens, 32 00 
28 tons hay, 280 00 
1 " straw, 10 00 
1 disk harrow, 15 00 

1 spring tooth harrow, 18 00 

2 cultivators, 10 00 

4 plows, 20 00 
1 single harness, 8 00 
1 set double harness, 40 00 
1 pung, 15 00 
1 wagon, 25 00 
1 hay tedder, 38 00 
1 mowing machine, 50 00 

1 horse rake, 20 00 

2 hay racks, 20 00 
2 pair farm wheels, 20 00 

2 farm carts, 5 00 
1 set wheels, 10 00 
1 double dump cart, 75 00 
1 " " sled, 20 00 
1 travers runner sled, 30 00 
1 ox sled, 5 00 
1 iron bar, 75 

1 grind stone, 1 00 

3 chains, 1 00 
Windmills, 300 00 

2 halters, 1 50 



4 hay forks, 1 00 
Scythes and snaths, 3 00 
Brushes and combs, 1 00 
1 hay cutter, 3 00 
1 garden fork, 25 
1 hitch weight, 1 00 

1 carriage jack, 1 50 

2 ladders, 3 00 
Spreader and yoke, 3 00 

" " chain, 75 

18 shovels, 9 00 

2 manure forks, 1 50 

2 potato diggers, 50 

1 cider mill, 15 00 

1 wheel barrow, 3 00 

5 cords Manure, 30 00 
1 brand iron, 2 50 
1 axe, 50 

$15So 75 

Furniture as per Schedule 
in hands of Overseers, 

$308 08 

SUPPLIES ON HAND. 



7 bush beans, 


$ 2100 


5 " meal, 


3 25 


1 " corn, 


70 


5 " oats, 


3 00 


100 lbs. shorts, 


1 25 


25 gals, pickles, 


5 00 


50 gals, molasses, 


15 00 


175 lbs. pork, 


10 00 


70 bush potatoes, 


00 00 


1 bbl. Hour, 


5 75 


100 lbs. sugar, 


50 


2 lbs. tobacco, 


70 


80 lbs. butter, 


20 00 


50 " fish, 


2 00 


15 " lard, 


100 


Oil and barrel, 


5 50 


5 bush, beets, 


2 50 


25 lbs. evap. apples, 


3 75 


3 bbl. apples, 


10 00 


50 bush, turnips, 


10 00 


2 tons coal, 


12 00 




$198 90 



30 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS, ETC. 



STONE CRUSHER AND 
ROAD TOOLS. 


Furniture and safes in 
office 


Crusher and engine, $1500 00 
Champion road mach., 175 00 
1 old machine, 25 00 

1 iron road scoop, 10 00 

2 iron bars, 1 50 
Lot stone drills and 

hammers, 5 00 


FIRE APPARA r . 

5 hose houses, 
2 " wagons, 
5 " carts, 
4,200 feet fire hose, 


$1,716 50 





$300 00 

JS. 

'$■ 500 00 

200 00 

200 00 

2000 00 

$2,900 00 
$15,261 13 



Dr. 



To amount expended 
balance, 



SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS. 

By appropriation, 



$579 33 
220 67 

$800 00 



By balance, 
Order drawn in favor of School Committee 



Cr. 

$800 00 

$800 00 
$220 67 

$579 33 



Dr. SEWER. Cr. 

To amount expended, $5,493 77 By bonds issued, $5,500 00 

balance, 6 23 

$5,500 00 $5,500 00 

By balance, $6 23 

C. O. Barrows, typewriting $ 8 40 

LeGrow Bros., lumber 3 64 

I. F. Clark, paid for trucking iron pipe 1 00 

Winslow & Co., pipe ;....... 1,561 81 

Eugene McGillicucldy, contract 3,673 25 

Pat Morgan, labor 1 87 

Ilsley & Cummings, services as engineers 200 00 

Portland Water Co., iron pipe 10 80 

Sumner Libby, labor 33 00 

$5,493 77 





SNOW BILLS, ETC. 


31 


Dr. 


SNOW BILLS. 


Cr. 


To amount expended, 
balance, 


$283 81 
16 19 


By appropriation, 


$300 00 




$300 00 


By balance, 


$300 00 






$16 19 



George McKenney, labor j — $ 3 00 

F. W. Edward, work on snow plow 6 50 

R. D. Hollis, labor . 3 00 

O. L. Knowles, " 1100 

L. Rumery, " ,. . 3 75 

J. Runiery, " 4 50 

E. G. Johnson 2 00 

E. L. Cobb 18 75 

Mannis Boice 16 50 

F. W. Edward, labor and material 2 00 

E. M. Thomes, " 3 00 

G.G.Lane, " 10 00 

W. H. Bragdonj " 22 50 

W. E. Knight, " 8 30 

A. Tate 5 40 

George B. Leavitt 3 50 

E. C. Robinson 19 25 

A. W. Wilson 73 55 

J. L. Sawyer, making snow plow 6 50 

Charles Murphy 3 00 

LeGroAv Bros., lumber 9 21 

Marshall Libby, labor 9 00 

Pat Feeney, " 12 00 

J. H. Read, " 4 00 

Sumner Libby, " 4 00 

Alms House and Farm team, labor 19 60 

$283 81 



Dr. STROUD WATER BRIDGE. 


Cr. 


To amount expended, 


$4,424 55 


By appropriation, 


$4,500 00 


balance, 


75 45 








$4,500 00 




$4,500 00 






By balance, 


$75 45 


John H. Blake, labor. . . 






. . . . $ 58 00 


J.B.Blake. " ., 






13 00 



32 STJPPOBT OF SCHOOLS, ETC. 

LeGrow Bros., lumber 4 95 

J. B. Fickett & Co., labor 7 90 

Rufus Deering & Co., lumber 39 70 

Portland Company, bolts 5 70 

Berlin Iron Bridge Co., bridge 1,600 00 

Sumner Libby, labor 5 00 

C. M. & H. T. Plummer, wire fence 16 05 

R. D. Shannahan, mason work 2,625 00 

E. L. Milliken, labor 1 75 

Chas. Pollister, " 6 00 

R. C. Sweet, " 3 75 

E.G.Johnson, " and batters 8 00 

Mannix Brothers, stone work 27 00 

A. Tate, lighting lanterns 2 75 

$4,424 55 



Dr. 



SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS, 1890. 



To Order No. 23, Feb. 

9, 1891, $6,479 38 

balance to new acct., 3,329 10 



$9,808 48 



Cr. 



By balance, $ 187 26 

appropriation, 1890 ; 6,800 00 
school fund and mill 

tax, Jan. 9, 1891, 2,821 22 



By balance, 



$9,808 48 
$3,329 10 



Dr. 



TEXT BOOKS. 



To amount expended, $1,793 19 By appropriation, 

balance, 206 81 

$2,000 00 

By balance, 

Order drawn in favor of School Committee 



Cr. 

$2,000 00 



$2,000 00 
$206 81 



$1,793 19 



Dr. TOWN LANDING, NEAR BEDFORD ST. Cr. 

By appropriation, $10.00 



TOWN OFFICERS, ETC. 33 

Dr. TOWN OFFICERS, 1890. Cr. 

To amount expended, $1,737 30 By appropriation, $2,000 00 

balance, 262 70 

$2,000 00 $2,000 00 

By balance, $262 70 

Lemuel W. Dyer, selectman and assessor, to Feb. 2, 1891 $ 153 00 

Elbridge G. Johnson, " " " " .122 00 

John H. Blake, " " " " • 94 00 

Geo. H. Crocker, " " " " 242 00 

Gilman G. Lane, " " " " 42 00 

Isaac F. Clark, " " " " 182 00 

Adam W. Wilson, " " " " 166 00 

Chas. H. Leighton, office work 122 00 

Geo. W. Ward, treasurer 300 00 

F. E. C. Bobbins, supervisor of schools 278 78 

F. Burnell, town clerk 35 52 

$1,737 30 



Dr. TOWN HOUSE LEDGE. Cr. 

To amount expended, $530 00 By appropriation, $600 00 

balance, 70 00 

$600 oo geoojoo 

By balance, $70 00 

F. L. Wescott, labor as per contract $ 510 00 

Stuart Worster, grading front* of town house 20 00 

$530 00 
Dr. WEST STREET. Cr. 

To amount expended, $649 35 By appropriation, $650 00 

balance, 65 

$650 00 $650 00 

By balance, $ 65 

Isaiah Elder, labor $ 1 25 

Wm. J. Fielding, " 3 00 

Marshall Libby, " 150 

p. P. Winslow, gravel 3 30 



84 RECEIPTS. 

Mannis Boice, labor 3 75 

Thomas Qualy, " 3 75 

W. P. Stevens, administrator, land damage — .' 300 00 

Carleton Kimball, " " " ....30000 

E. G. Johnson, labor 2 Oo 

Electric Light Co.rmoving pole ." 3 00 

A. W. Wilson, labor 25 80 

Stewart Worster, " 2 00 

$649 35 



RECEIPTS. 



ALMS HOUSE AND FARM. 

P. Feeney, sand $ 3 75 

A. Gondy, " 4 00 

E. II. Huston, hay "90 00 

Thomas Goucly, sand 1 50 

Richard Rowe, " 29 75 

Win. Lucas, " 1889 40 00 

Wm. Lucas, " 4 50 

Martin Curran, jr., " 13 75 

Portland Street Sprinkling Co., sand 25 25 

Alms House and Farm team, work on road 440 20 

" snow. 19 60 

A. Tate, sand 2 50 

J. D. Johnson, hay 14 45 

Wm. H. Irish, keeper, {sand, hay and produce 726 14 

M. Hamblet, sand, 1889 35 00 

D. II. Read, " 3 25 

J. H. Read, " 6 25 

A. P. ToplifiE, hay 13 92 

R. S. Stimson, sand 6 13 

$1,404 84 

SCHOOL. 
School Fund and Mill Tax $2,821 22 



RECEIPTS. 35 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Received from State Treasurer $ 125 00 



INCIDENTALS. 

Washburn and Arlington's Circus License 40 00 

Forepaugh Circus License 80 00 

$ 120 00 



- COMMISSIONS AND ABATEMENTS. 
Railroad and Telegraph Tax $1,568 49 

OUT DOOR POOR. 

Town of Westbrook $146 61 

" Windham 26 35 

" Brunswick 184 39 

" Minot 53 65 

$ 411 00 

ROADS AND BRIDGES. 

A. F. Berry, ashes 1 00 

F. A. Libby, sand 1 75 

A. W. Wilson " 1 00 

Fred Jenney, " 2 50 

E. C. Robinson, sand 6 00 

Cumberland County, use of road machine and team 10 00 

O. L. Knowles, loam 3 00 

$ 25 25 

Whole amount of receipts .$6,475 80 



36 LIABILITIES. 

LIABILITIES. 



Temporary Loan $35,550 00 

Outstanding Bills (estimated) 1,400 00 

Igj^PJiO 

To meet these Liabilities are the following Resources: 

Balance in hands of Collector for 1883 $ 29 85 

1884 140 31 

1885 1,320 99 

1886 175 82 

*" 1887 1,870 06 

1888 '. 658 48 

1889 2,536 80 

1890 18,497 97 

$25,230 28 

Tax deeds in hands of Treasurer $ 5,524 00 

Non-resident tax lists in hands of Treasurer 633 94 

Cash in hands of Treasurer 6,845 57 

$13,003 51 

Due from Town of Minot $ 75 94 

Chas. E. Jack's estate 250 00 

Town of Westbrook 31 50 

" " Windham 3 37 

A. A. Brackett, sand, 1887 7 50 

Frank Desmond, " 1887 4 00 

Thomas S. Files, " 1887 14 00 

J. E. Hollis, " 1887 4 00 

R. D. Hollis. " 1S88-89 -6 25 

O. L. Knowles, " 1888-89 4 00 '. 

George Meserve, " 1890 19 25 

M.D.Sawyer, loam, 1890 5 00 

Wm. Lucas, Portland yard, sand, 1889 25 00 

Wm. Lucas, " " " 1890 35 00 

Wm. Lucas, Deering " " 1890...... 40 00 

M. Hamlett, sand, 1889-90 75 00 

M. Hamlett, " Portland yard, 1890 35 00 

Mr. Hernck, on George St., lumber, 1890. . . 32 

Eastern Eorge Co., Ea. Deering, sand, 1890, 1 00 

$ 636 13 

$38,869 92 
$5,500 of the Bonded Debt matures June 1, 1891. 
$1,000 matures November 1, 1891. 



TREASURER S REPORT. 



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38 



STATEMENT OF THE TOWN DEBT. 



STATEMENT OF THE TOWN DEBT. 



NUB1BER OF 
BONDS. 



64 to 
78 
85 
87 to 



67 inc. 



88 inc. 
101 " 
136 " 



117 
137 
151 to 155 inc 



158 

160 
177 
190 
198 
207 
213 
219 



159 
176 
189 
197 
206 
212 
218 
221 



AMOUNT, 



$5,500 00 

1,000 00 

500 00 

1,500 00 

6,500 00 

10,000 00 

500 00 

2,500 00 

1,000 00 

11,500 00 
6,500 00 
6,750 00 
6,225 00 
5,000 00 
5,000 00 
1,500 00 



$71,475 00 



DATE. 



June 1 
Nov. 1 
Apr. 1 
June 1 
Dec. 1, 
Apr. 
June 1 
July 1 
Nov. 1 
Apr. 1 
Feb. 1 
June 1 
June 1 
Aug. 1 
Sept. ] 
Oct. 1 



1876 
1876 
1877 
1877 
1877 
1878 
1878 
1880 
1880 
1882 
1884 
1887 
1888 
1890 
1890 
1890 





RATE 


TIME. 


PER 




CENT. 


15 yrs. 


6 


15 " 


6 


15 " 


6 


15 " 


6 


15 " 


5 


15 " 


5 


15 " 


5 


15 " 


4 


15 " 


4 


15 " 


4 


10 " 


4 


20 " 


4 


10 " 


4 


20 " 


4 


20 " 


4 


20 " 


4 



WHEN DUE. 



June 

Novem'r 

April 

June 

Decem'r 

April 

June 

July 

Novem'r 

April 

February 

June 

June 

August 

Septem'r 

October 



1, 1891 
1, 1891 
1, 1892 
1, 1892 
1, 1892 
1, 1893 
1, 1893 
1, 1895 
1, 1895 
1, 1897 
1, 1894 
1, 1907 
1, 1898 
1, 1910 
1, 1910 
1, 1910 



This isjto certify that I have examined the books and accounts of 
the Treasurer, Selectmen and School Committee of the town of 
Deering, and find the same correctly cast and properly vouched. 



(Signed.) 



CHAS. H. LEIGHTON, Auditor. 



COLLECTORS ACCOUNTS. 



39 



COLLECTORS' ACCOUNTS. 



Dr. 

February 15. 
To Balance due the Town. 



ELIAS M. JACOBS, Collector, 1883. 
February 14. 



Cr. 



V 50 13 
$ 50 13 



By Cash paid Treasurer $> 20 28 

Balance due the Town. 21) 85 



60 13 



GRENVILLE M. STEVENS, Collector, 1884. 
February 15. February 14. 

To balance due the Town $ 266 01 | By Cash paid Treasurer $ 125 70 

140 31 

| 266 01 



Balance due the Town 
| 266 01 I 
GRENVILLE M. STEVENS. Collector. 1885. 



February 15. 
To Balance due the Town $ 1.747 85 



February 14. 

By Cash paid Treasurer $ 426 86 

Balance due the Town 1,320 90 



February 15. 



HENRY B. WEBB, Collector, 1886. 
February 14. 



$ 1,747 



To Balance due the Town $ 225 82 



$ 225 82 



By Cash paid Treasurer $ 50 00 

Balance due the Town 175 82 



225 82 



February 15. 



HENRY B. WEBB, Collector, 1887. 
February 14. 



To Balance due the Town $2,820 06 



2,820 06 



By Cash paid Treasurer $ 9i0 00 

Balance due the Town 1,870 06 

9 2,8-4) 06 



February 15. 



FRED V. MATTHEWS, Collector, 1 
February 14. 



To Balance due the Town $ 1,823 12 

Interest charged Feb. 14 26 19 



* 1,819 31 



By Cash, paid Treasurer.. . . 
Balance due the Town. 



■ 9 1,190 83 
65S 48 



February 15. 



To Balance due the Town $17,544 28 

.$17,544 28 



FRED V. MATTHEWS, Collector, 1889 
February 14. 
By Cash paid Treasure 



$15,007 48 

Balance due ihe Town 2,536 80 



FRED V. MATTHEWS, Collector, 1890. 
February 14. 



$17,514 28 



To Assessment $58,400 48 



By Cash paid Treasurer $39,902 51 

Balance due the Town 18,497 97 



41^40048 
Balance due the Town from all the Collectors, $25,230 28. 



$58,400 48 



Report of School Committee, 



To the Citizens of Deering : 

The School Committee, as constituted by the Special Act of the 
Legislature in 1889, have the honor of submitting herewith their 
second annual report : 

At their first meeting after the last annual election of town offi- 
cers, Reuel Small was elected Chairman of the Board, and the rules 
under which the Committee had carried on their work during the 
previous year were re-adopted. These rules are set forth at large 
in the last report of the Committee. 

A detailed statement of the money paid out by the Treasurer on 
bills contracted under the appropriations committed to the hands of 
the Committee will be found elsewhere; but the actual present con- 
dition of those appropriations can only be shown, of course, by tak- 
ing into account the entire expenditures for the year, including the 
full expenses of the winter terms, which are chiefly unpaid at the 
time of writing this report. But these expenses are all known to 
the Committee, save possibly some trifling incidentals, hence we are 
able to present a substantially exact statement of what will be the 
standing of the appropriations when all bills have been paid and the 
accounts closed. We are glad to call attention to the fact that in 
the case of each of the six appropriations under which we were 
charged to make expenditures, a balance is left in favor of the town. 

HIGH SCHOOL. 

Appropriation, $2,000 00 

Received from State, 250 00 

$2,250 00 

EXPENDITURES. 

Teachers' salaries for the year, $1,794 36 

Janitors' " " " 107 25 

Fuel, 126 03 

Incidentals, 38 11 

Net bai. against town from old acct., 25 15 

— $2,090 90 

Balance in favor of Town, — $159 10 



SCHOOL REPORT. 41 

SCHOOLS 



Balance from last year, $ 187 26 

Appropriation, 6,800 00 

Received from State, 2,821 32 



EXPENDITURES. 


qpi/,UVU ou 


Teachers' salaries for the year, $6,832 00 




Janitors' " " " 896 75 




Fuel, 803 53 




Insurance, 349 00 




Incidentals, 215 09 






$9,096 37 




Balance in favor of Town, 

SCHOOL BOOKS. 


t71° °1 




Appropriation, $2,000 00 




Expenditures, 1,878 86 





Balance in favor of Town, $121 14 

REPAIRS. 

Balance from old accounts, $ 81 74 

Appropriation, 800 00 



$881 74 
Expenditures, 691 63 



Balance in favor of Town, $190 11 

i 
LIRBY'S CORNER SCHOOL HOUSE. 

Appropriation, $800 00 

Expenditures, 725 80 



Balance in favor of Town, $74 20 

MORRILL'S CORNER SCHOOL HOUSE (Steam Heat). 

Appropriation, $800 00 

Expenditures, 780 00 



Balance in favor of Town, $20 00 



42 SCHOOL REPORT. 

While the financial report will, we trust, be gratifying to all, we 
do not forget that the town is much more interested in the results 
achieved in the school room than in any balance which your Com- 
mittee may be able to save from an appropriation. In our last report 
we said: "The work of the schools for the past year, in the main, 
reflects credit upon teachers and pupils. In some respects a marked 
improvement is manifest." These words were true as applied to the 
year then closing, and we are glad to say that with equal faithful- 
ness they describe the character of the work for the past year. Our 
schools are in good condition and the tendency is decidedly up- 
ward. The Course of Study, which was placed in the hands of our 
teachers a year ago, has had no small influence in bringing about the 
improvement we have mentioned, but the full benefit which is to be 
derived from it, we believe, will not be manifest for three years to 
come. 

There have been but few changes among our teachers, and those 
chiefly caused by sickness. The Committee are not infallible, but 
they believe that they cannot fail to secure efficient service for the 
town so long as they adhere to the policy by which they have thus 
far sought to be guided. That policy has but two counts: First, 
secure a good teacher, and second, keep him. 

There was graduated from the High School at the end of the last 
school year a class of nine, and twenty-seven boys and twenty-five 
girls were admitted to the school. The Committee desire to make 
the High School the greatest possible good to every boy and every 
girl in the town. To this end they believe that the work called for 
by the Grammar grade should be at least fairly well done before 
that called for by the High School is undertaken. While the course 
of the Committee, based upon, this theory, may have caused some 
disappointment to a few boys and girls whose examinations seemed 
to indicate unmistakably that the High School course would be 
wasted upon them unless entered upon with better preparation, yet 
it has resulted not only in giving the High School a class well 
equipped and of excellent grade, but it has given tone and charac- 
ter to the work being done in the Grammar Schools;, and what it 
has done in the past we are confident that it will do in the future. 

As directed by the State laws and the vote of the town the Com- 
mittee last summer completely supplied the schools with text books. 
The total expenditures for this purpose, nearly nineteen hundred 



SCHOOL REPORT. 43 

dollars, will be found itemized upon another page. The number of 
books required proved to be greater thau we anticipated a year ago, 
but as we were able to make unexpectedly good trades the appro- 
priation proved sufficient. The books were not selected until after 
the most careful examination, and were in every case, at length, the 
unanimous decision of the Committee. The books thus far appear 
to be wisely chosen. They are wearing well and the pupils are do- 
ing good work with them. They are being well cared for, no case 
of willful mutilation or defacement having been reported to us. It 
may be too early to reach a conclusion, but the wisdom of the "free 
text book" law seems certain to be established. The number of 
scholars in our schools is increasing year by year, and books will 
wear out, hence a small annual appropriation will be necessary to 
keep the schools properly furnished. We would recommend for 
that purpose for the coming year an appropriation of $300. 

The winter term has. usually commenced the second week in De- 
cember, run for a couple of weeks, and then been broken in upon by 
a week's vacation during the Christmas holidays. This has been a 
great disadvantage to the work of the schools. To save this break 
the Committee decided to make the last fall term twelve weeks, to 
be followed by a vacation of three weeks, and a winter term of ten 
weeks beginning the Monday after Christmas. This has proved an 
advantage to the schools. 

It has been frequently suggested to the Committee that it would 
be an advantage to have our school year increased from thirty-three 
to thirty-six weeks. The Committee fully appreciate the. force of 
these suggestions, and are mindful of the fact that even with such 
increase our school year would be several weeks shorter than is that 
of our neighbor, Portland ; yet, as the proposed change would cre- 
ate considerable additional expense, we have thought it best to mere- 
ly call the attention of the town to it, without urging its adoption. 
A school year of thirty-six weeks would call for an increase of the 
High School appropriation of about $200, and of that of the other 
schools about $800. 

Early in the year the Primary school upon Saunders street be- 
came so crowded that it was necessary to devote the whole of that 
building to it. We therefore removed the Intermediate school, 
which had been using the upper room, to the lower room in the 
Ocean street house. There is now no vacant school room in town, 



44 SCHOOL REPORT. 

save the old house at Bradley's, which was vacated on the comple- 
tion of the Libby's Corner house. 

Most 'of the school houses are in good condition, though two or 
three of them should be painted at once, and repairs of a different 
character are needed by some of the others. We would recommend 
that there be appropriated for the purpose of repairs the sum of $800. 

The appropriation above recommended does not include extensive 
repairs upon the house at Riverton, nor does the statement as to the 
general condition of the school property apply to that school room. 
That there should be some change there is evident, but just what 
the change should be can be more easily decided when certain prop- 
ositions which the Committee have been led to suppose would be 
made to the town have been made known. 

In our last report we called attention to the crowded condition of 
the school house at Oakdale, and of certain transfers that had been 
made necessary thereby. The conditions that existed then are, of 
course, more pronounced at this time, for it is a growing community. 
We would renew our recommendation of a year ago, that the sum 
of 11,100 be appropriated for the purpose of finishing and furnish- 
ing the upper room of the Pitt street house. 

For the support of the Common Schools we recommend, if the 
length of the school year is not to be increased, the sum of $6,500. 

The usual statistics, and the statement of money actually paid out 
by the Treasurer, under the appropriations in the hands of the Com- 
mittee, are appended. 



SCHOOL REPORT. 



45 



TABULAR VIEW OF SCHOOLS 



Schools. 



High. 



Ocean St. Gram 

Ocean St. Int . . 
Saunders' TJ. P. 
Saunders' L. P. 
Center Int 

Center Prim. . . 
Lunt's Cor. G.. 

Lunt's Cor. P. . 
East Deering. . 

Winslow's 

Riverside 

Riverton 

Allen's Cor. . . . 

Nason's Cor 

Libby's Cor. G. 
Libby's Cor. P. 
Stroud water. . 
Morrill's Gram. 

Morrill's Int. . . 

Morrill's Prim. 
Oakdale 



Teachers. 



Edgar H. Crosby.. . 
Helen J. Webster.. 
Ch'lotte W. Montgomery 
Mattie B. Russell f. 

H. C. Hawkes 

Lucy S. Anderson . . 
L. M. Wescott 1 1 ■ ■ 

H. Louise Chase 

C. E. Vanhorn 

Hattie V. Elder,* Myra 

L. Elder t J 

Rose W. Lelancl 

Melissa E. Elder,* Mary 

A. Elwell t \ 

Susie P. Kimball 

Jane R. Hale 

Bertha A. Knight 

Mary E. Smith 

Mary E. Whittier 

Fannie E. Hopkinson.. . . 

Isabel Jordan 

Grace Read 

Lizzie B. Cobb 

E. E. Maxfield 

Mary A. Elwell,* Melissa 

E. Elder t \ 

Myra L. Elder,* Lucy J. 

Goddard U 

Anna V. Hunt 

Nellie L. Morrison 

A. P. Stockwell 



Regif 


>- 


Average 


terecl 




Attendance. 


u 


r-J 


p 


u 


r-H 


ri 


ft 




£ 


ft 




£ 


81 


113 


106 


72 


106 


99 


82 


109 


108 




75 


95 


95 


47 


50 


47 


42 


43 


43 


55 


38 


38 


48 


31 


32 


38 


38 


35 


32 


30 


27 


34 


36 


30 


33 


31 


27 


42 


36 


27 


38 


30 


23 


32 


45 


41 


30 


41 


33 


43 


30 


27 


37 


27 


20 


45 


41 


37 


41 


36 


27 


40 


29 


26 


30 


23 


24 


19 


20 


15 


15 


17 


10 


32 


31 


28 


26 


25 


20 


23 


25 


17 


19 


19 


13 


10 


13 


11 


9 


10 


10 


22 


26 


23 


19 


22 


1^ 


55 


49 


42 


42 


39 


33 


19 


23 


28 


17 


19 


22 


43 


42 


39 


40 


40 


35 


35 


30 


29 


32 


28 


24 


56 


57 


47 


47 


51 


39 


55 


57 


54 


45 


48 


49 



9% 
& 

30 30 

13 64 

11 

12 

15 15 

12 

11 

9 

8 

9 

10 
10 



Spring Term. t Fall Term. t Winter Term. 



Number of Scholars in Town April 1, 1890, 
Increase from April 1, 1889, 
Number of Pupils registered, Spring Term, 

Fall 

Winter " 
Average attendance, Spring Term, 
" • " Fall 

Winter " 



1,508 
61 
908 
938 
855 
789 
811 
724 



46 



SCHOOL EEPORT. 



Dr. 



HIGH SCHOOL. 



Cr. 



To net bal. from '89 acct. , $ 25 15 
amount expended, 1,475 17 
balance, 624 68 



$2,125 00 



By appropriation, $2,000 00 

rec'd from State, '90, 125 00 



$2,125 00 



Allen, H. J. chemicals, &c, '89 $ 3 26 

Cheney, J. D. tuning piano, '89 and '90 5 00 

Crosby, E. H. teaching 696 96 

supplies 100 

Grimmer, C. W. music for graduation 15 50 

Hoegg, D. W. <ST Co., supplies 1 92 

McCloon, E. H. janitor t 22 00 

Mitchell & Bickf ord, programmes 7 00 

Merrill, W. Clark sweeping 31 25 

Montgomery, C. W. teaching 242 00 

Pierce, C. W. janitor 22 00 

Robbins, F. E. C. ribbon for diplomas 1 40 

Robbins, II. C. janitor 2 00 

Russell, Mattie B. teaching 156 00 

Stevens & Jones, supplies 2 35 

Warren, D. S. & Co., coal 115 53 

Webster, Helen J. teaching 150 00 

$1,475 17 

Dr. LIBBY'S CORNER SCHOOL HOUSE. Cr. 

To amount expended, $725 80 By appropriation, $800 00 

balance, 74 20 

_$_800_00 $800 00 

Batchelder, C. H. window shades $ 23 80 

Johnson, E. G. labor and material 689 00 

Starbird, E. D. " " 13 00 

$725 80 

Dr. MORRILL'S COR. SCHOOL HOUSE (Stm. Heat). Cr. 

To amount expended, $780 00 By appropriation, $800 00 

balance. 20 00 

$800 00 $800 00 



Evans, O. C. as per contract $750 00 

Johnson, E. G. labor 30 00 

$780 00 



SCHOOL REPORT. 47 

Dr. SCHOOL BOOKS. Cb. 

To amount expended, $1,79319 By appropriation, $2,000 00 

balance, 206 81 

$2,000 00 $2,000 00 

American Book Co. : 

62 Harper's 2nd Readers, @ .14 4-10 $ 8 93 

90 " 3rd " " .1*7 15 30 

30 " 4th " " .23 6 90 

162 Swinton's Gram. Seh. Geog. @ .50 81 00 

317 " Int. " " .30 . . 95 10 

108 Eggleston's U. S. History, " .55 59 40 

250 Natural Speller, " .08 20 00 

, 235 Harrington's Speller, " .08 1-10 19 04 

200 White's Elem. Arithmetic, " .25 50 00 

24 Steele's Chem., @ $1.00 (less 1-5) 19 20 

36 " Physics, "1.00 " 28 80 

24 " Physiology, " 1.00 " 19 20 

30 " Astronomy," 1.00 " 24 00 

18 Searing's Virgil, " 1.40 " 20 16 

48 Harkness' Lat. Gram. " 1.12 " 43 01 $510 04 

Bennett, H. B. rubber stamp 1 00 1 00 

Boston School Supply Co. : 

135 Monroe's 1st Readers, @ .17 22 95 

125 " 2nd " ".25 3125 

60 " 3rd " ".35 2100 

110 " 4th " ".55 60 50 

39 " 5th " ".70 27 30 163 00 

Ginn & Co. : 

252 Wentworth's Gram. Sch. Arith., @ .05 (less 1-6). . . .136 50 
12 " Prim. " " .30 " .... 3 00 

28 CaBsar, @ 1.25 (less 1-6) 29 17 

45 Latin First Book, " 1.00 " 37 50 

36 Wentworth's Geom., " 1.25 " 37 50 

18 Greek Gram., "1.50 " 22 50 

12 " Lessons, "1.20 " 12 00 

18 Anabasis, "1.50 " ". . . 22 50 

8 Latin Composition, "1.00 " 6 67 

30 Montgomery's Eng. Hist,, @ 1.12 (less 1-6) 28 00 335 34 

Heath, D. C. & Co.: 

120 Hyde's Lang. Less., Part I., @ .50 (less 1-6) 50 00 

206 " " " " II., '• .29 " 59 74 109 74 

Houghton, Miflin & Co., 385 Colburn's Ment. Arith., @ .29|. 114 54 114 54 
Leach, Shew ell & Sanborn, 60 Greenleaf s El. Alg., @ .84. . . 50 40 50 40 
Lee & Shepherd, 4,000 labels 8 00 8 00 



48 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Parkman, B. L. (Agent) express and freight on sch. books. . 11 05 11 05 
Porter & Coates, 180 Raub's Eng. Gram., @ .40 (less 1-10). . . 64 80 64 80 

Seal, G. F. hauling and putting up book cases 11 50 11 50 

Smith, Geo. R. 24 book cases 165 00 165 00 

Taintor Bros.: 

185 Franklin 1st Readers, @ .16 29 60 

132 " 2nd " ".25 33 00 

70 " 3rd " ".35 24 50 

75 " 4th " " .45 33 75 

42 " 5th " ".60 25 20 146 05 

University Pub. Co., 60 Maury's Phys. Geog., @ 1.20 (less 1-6) 60 00 

Case 60 60 60 

Watrous, Joseph covers for school books 42 13 42 13 

$1,793 19 



Dr. SCHOOL HOUSE REPAIRS. Cb. 

To amount expended, $579 33 By appropriation, $800 00 

balance, 302 41 net bal. from old accts., 81 74 

$881 74 $881 74 

Bailey, F. E $ 39 85 

Berry, G. S 4 60 

Curran, Martin cementing cellars, etc 133 15 

Dole, John Riverside 2 20 

Eldridge, L. G. repairing blackboard 4 70 

Gould, J. E. fence, High School lot 20 58 

Greeley, J. Saunders' St. schoolhouse. 3 75 

Huston, W. W. JSTason's schoolhouse 34 74 

Holmes, J. H. Libby's Cor. " 10 13 

Jacobs, Geo. B '. 1 00 

Jones, C. H. & Co., sundry bills 162 44 

Johnson, E.G. 39 16 

Lane & Burnham 1 77 

LeGrow Bros., lumber 40 00 

Plummer, (J.M.&H.T 4 70 

Seal, Geo. F. sundry bills 37 76 

Small, John T 23 10 

Smith, Dana M 5 00 

Starbird, E. D. Nason's Cor. school-house. . 3 00 

Stiles, E. M 3 50 

Thornton, Thomas grading 4 20 

$579 33 



SCHOOL REPORT. 49 

Dr. SUPPORT OF SCHOOLS. C». 

To amount expended, $6,479 38 By appropriation, $6,800 00 

balance, 3,329 20 rec'd from State, 2,821 32 

bal. from 1889 acct.. 187 26 

$9,808 58 $9,808 58 

Adams, Elmer E. janitor $ 59 00 

cleaning and supplies. 5 85 

American Express Co., express on crayon 2 25 

Anderson, Lucy S. teaching 276 00 

Barnes, A. S. & Co., school records 11 00 

Blocklinger, Ered janitor 46 00 

" supplies, etc 1 53 

Brown, Mrs. cleaning 3 75 

Cain, Ellen cleaning 3 00 

Chase, H. Louise teaching 207 00 

Chenery, W. !N . janitor 16 50 

Chenery, D. D. insurance premiums 259 00 

Cobb, Lizzie B. teaching 207 00 

Connor, John C. cleaning vaults 16 00 

Dole, John janitor 34 50 

11 " cleaning and supplies 4 70 

Edgar, Mrs. James janitor 34 50 

" " cleaning 2 00 

Edwards & Walker, supplies 3 10 

Elder, Melissa E. teaching 230 00 

Elder, Myra L. M * 207 00 

Elder, Hattie V. " 99 00 

Elwell, Mary A. " 230 00 

Emerson, B. W. janitor 11 00 

Goddard, Lucy J. teaching 108 00 

Graffam, Kate cleaning 3 00 

Hale, Jane R. teaching 184 00 

Harris & Williams, printing 4 75 

Hawkes, Hiram C. teaching 348 47 

Hooper, Son & Leighton, chairs 4 50 

Hopkinson, Fannie E. teaching 184 00 

Hunt, Anna V. " 207 00 

Johnson, F. H. coal 29 75 

Jones, C. H. & Co., cleaning stove 1 00 

Jordan, Isabel teaching 184 00 

Kendall & Whitney, duster 65 

Kimball, Susie P. teaching 184 00 

Knight, Bertha A. " 216 00 

Knight, Fred H. janitor 22 00 



50 SCHOOL REPORT. 

Knight, Fred H. cleaning 2 00 

Leavitt, Geo. B. hauling wood 50 

Leland, Eose W. teaching. 230 00 

Loving, Prentiss insurance premiums 90 00 

Matthews, Fred V. taking list of scholars 25 00 

Maxfielcl, E. F. teaching 184 00 

McOarty, Josie P. " 36 00 

McCloon, E. H. janitor 11 00 

Merrill, W. Clark janitor 122 75 

u " cleaning and supplies 3 05 

Merrill, L. F. janitor 82 00 

" cleaning 2 00 

Milliken, F. F. janitor 28 75 

" " putting in coal, etc 150 

Morrison, Nellie L. teaching 207 00 

Morrill, Margaret cleaning 4 56 

Parmenter Crayon Co., crayon 7 00 

Pierce, C. W. janitor 16 50 

Read, Grace teaching 207 00 

Bobbins, E. A. " 60 00 

Robbins, F. E. C. postage, etc 1 00 

Bobbins, H. C. janitor 1 00 

Sawyer, J. S. " 46 00 

labor 50 

Smith, Mary E. teaching 138 00 

Smith, Mrs. Cyrus cleaning 5 45 

Starbird, Scott R. janitor 11 00 

Stevens & Jones, supplies 16 99 

Stockwell, A. P. teaching 127 00 

Traynor, Mrs. M. sweeping 7 00 

Vanhorn, Carrie E. teaching 194 00 

Warren, D. S. & Co., coal 581 28 

Webber, John A. janitor 34 50 

Wescott, L. M. teaching 132 00 

Whittier, Mary E. " 184 00 

" janitor 28 75 

$6,479 38 
Respectfully submitted, 

Reuel Small, C. A. Woodbury, 

Geo. W. Johnson, F. E. C. Robbins, 
D. W. Hawkes, Geo. B. Leavitt, 

S. A. Packard, 

/S. /S. Committee. 



The Town Landing at Stroudwater. 



Article 44 of the Warrant for the Annual Town Meeting, 1890, 
reads as follows : 

"To see if the town will vote to protect the town's property at 
Stroudwater, known as the Town Landing, against all encroach- 
ments." 

Voted, "To refer to the Selectmen Article 44 of the Warrant, 
and they to report at the next Annual Town Meeting." 

We employed Edward C. Jordan, civil engineer, of Portland, to 
reproduce the locations of monuments and boundary lines upon the 
earth at Stroudwater of the old Landing, and his statement, accom- 
panied by plans, we here present : 

Portland, Me., Feb. 5, 1891. 
To L. W. Dyer, Chairman of Board of Selectmen, Deerinrj, Me. 

Sir: — Inclosed herewith is a plan showing the position upon the 
ground of the Landing laid out at Stroudwater by the Selectmen 
in April, 1771, upon which I report as follows, to wit— (The record 
of said Landing may be found in the Portland City Clerk's office, in 
the old Falmouth Records, Vol. 2, page G28) : 

" The north side line of the Landing begins at the south-west 
corner of the Geo. Tate's warehouse, and extends south 37° west, (?) 
adjoining Widow Patrick's land, and touching the face of Widow, 
Patrick's barn." 

You will note that three monuments are given for the control of 
this line. I mention these facts to show that the course S. 37° W., 
which is undoubtedly a clerical error, must yield as the law provides, 
to the monuments, which are allowed to control over bearing and 
distances. The verification of the monuments referred to in the 
record of the Landing are as follows, to wit : 

1st. The position of the Geo. Tate's warehouse can be re-estab- 
lished quite exactly by the record of a law suit fixing the bounds of 
the lot on which the warehouse stood (see Court of Common Pleas, 



52 TOWN LANDING. 

Vol. 4, page 504, 1784), and by deed of David Patrick's house to 
William Tate, Vol. 16, page 530, 1785, of the lot on which the old 
part of Andrew Hawes' store now stands. These two references 
serve to locate the position that the warehouse formerly oocupied 
with reasonable accuracy. 

2nd. The line of the Widow Patrick's land referred to is on the 
course of S. 50° 30' West, in 1743, which is the course repeated 
1785, in the above sale referred to, to William Tate, and this course 
to-day corresponds closely with the front line of Andrew Hawes' 
store. 

3rd. The Widow Patrick's barn mentioned is probably the one 
referred to in the record of the alteration of the road in front of 
Tristram C. Stevens' dwelling house, in 1833, in the Westbrook 
Records of that year, page 332, in which a certain barn called 
Stevens' barn was located by course and distance from the northerly 
corner of said Stevens' dwelling house. I have shown the position 
this barn probably occupied in red lines. 

4th. The south side line of the Landing was laid out 8 rods (132 
feet) southerly of the northerly line which I have described above. 

5th. Another valuable corroboration of the position and course 
being as I have projected the lines, is shown on the copy herewith 
furnished of the plan of partition between Thomas Seal and others, 
made in 1835, which locates the southerly side of the landing very 
near the same place that I have placed it, and practically upon the 
same course. I have felt obliged to explain thus at length in order 
that no doubt should remain in your mind but what the course of 
S. 37° W. was an error, and to make it plain that I have properly 
identified the old monuments referred to. 

6th. I show the line of a highway that was laid out in 1766, with 
reference to Stroudwater bridge, and the easterly line of said high- 
way where it crossed the Landing. It is as close an approximation 
to the lines of the highway in this vicinity as can, in my opinion, be 
made, and it corresponds quite fairly with the present occupation in 
front of the Landing ; but it was undoubtedly changed, either by 
permission or by record, in front of what I have marked Col. James 
Means' house, 1787, to the line of the present travel. 

7th. The line that I have marked Riparian line of Landing is 
approximately in harmony with the law that converging property 
lines must divide their interest in the flats, practically by a line at 
right angles to shore line at high water mark. 



TOWN LANDING. 53 

I have done the above work with certified copies of deeds and 
street records, where the necessary records were not open to my 
personal inspection. 

Yours truly, 

E. C. JORDAN, 

Civil Engineer. 

From other sources we select the following : 

Copies of records of the doings of the selectmen of Falmouth at 
the commencement of the last settlement of the town, which em- 
braces the time from that settlement till the war of the Revolution 
under the jurisdiction of which town was the territory the town of 
Deering is now located upon, and the people then living thereon, 
show that the site of the residence of Col. James Means, deceased, 
now known as the Mason house, was used as a "mast yard." 

In the year 1771, as Mr. Jordan shows in the foregoing report, 
which is substantiated by another record in the Portland public 
library, the. selectmen of Falmouth laid out a Public Landing at 
Stroudwater, twenty-five rods long, eight rods wide, and "to join 
the river for a Landing as aforementioned as per plan thereof?' 
The plan here alluded to, we are informed, can not be found. The 
end of the lot, or Landing, it seems by the record, joined the west- 
erly end of the Great "Bridge over Fore river as well as the water. 

When the land was taken by levy in the case of Waldo vs. West- 
brook thirty years prior to this date, the water boundary line of the 
lot commenced at the south-westerly corner of the great bridge and 
followed a, "course along the shore S. 80 m. E. fifteen rods to El- 
eanor Trickey's N. E. course.' 1 This record shows that the original 
record title to the land between the bridge and the Trickey lot 
gave possession to highwater mark only. 

In 1786 (Vol. 15, p. 32, Cum. Co. Reg. of Deeds) Sarah Waldo 
who seems by the records, to have rightfully come into the pos- 
session of the land adjoining the Landing on the southerly side, sold 
to John K. Smith, James Means and Josiah Cox, 

"A triangular piece of land about a quarter of an acre" — "the 
residue and remainder now unsold and not legally appropriated 
for a way or Landing." 

Immediately after this transaction it appears from comparison of 
dates these persons took possession of their purchase, then followed 



54 TOWN LANDING. 

a writ of ejectment duly issued by the court. This fact is ob- 
tained from the original court record now deposited in the Boston, 
Mass., court house, (Supreme Judicial Court, May and November, 
1789), and from this record the following transcript is made : 

"Article 4. To see if town will impower some person or persons 
to defend a piece of land lying at Stroudwater which was given and 
has been used for a public Landing for more than sixty years now 
claimed by Messrs. John K. Smith, James Means and Josiah Cox. 
Copied from the town warrant for the town meeting, Apr. 7. 1788. 
At the above named meeting, Article 4, Archelaus Lewis was chosen 
agent. Attest, Daniel Epes, Town Clerk" 

To this the defendants reply : 

. "In June, 1787, upon application to the selectmen, they ran out 
the Landing and staked the bounds thereof, after which we put up 
the fence." 

The defendants recovered against the town, that is, the defend- 
ants held the land where the Means house and Means wharf so- 
called, now standing, and the town held the Landing as locateb cly 
the selectmen, in 1771, and now relocated by Mr. Jordan. 

From these facts, in the absence of the original plan, it is plain 
that Messrs. Smith, Means and Cox, built their wharf on the divid- 
ing line between their claim and the eight rod way or Landing and 
the northerly side line of the old wharf, now standing, is the true, 
boundary line, and Mr. Jordan is in error in assigning on his plan a 
portion of the flats to the Means wharf property as shown by his 
"Approximate Riparion Line of Lands." 

Mr. Jordan's 'plan shows how nicely the southerly boundary line 
aud the line of the highway of 1757, and its change, of which no 
record can be found, all cross at the north westerly corner of the 
Means wharf lot. 

Upon a portion of the Landing adjoining the bridge was built a 
wharf — by whom and at what time does not appear from any public 
record thus far found. 

In the clerk's records of the town of Westbrook, (v. 1, p. 131, 
1828,) may be seen an allusion to the wharf as follows : 

"Voted that Col. Jeremiah Bailey's bill for repairs of town wharf 
amounting to $71.18, by giving up his bond (for the hire of the 
wharf) to the town." 



TOWN LANDING. 55 

Here is proof that the town claimed the so-called town wharf at 
Stroudwater five years before the town sold it. 

In 1833, Sep. 16, nine persons "associated themselves into a com- 
pany for the purpose of erecting a tide water mill dam company 
above the long bridge at Stroudwater Village in Westbrook to be 
called the Stroudwater Mill Dam Company." This transcript is 
made from the original record book of the company, duly signed by 
all the members; and one of the articles of the stipulation provides 
"that all rights and property contiguous to said mill dam, which 
may be hereafter obtained by either of said associates shall be com- 
mon property of the company, no one purchasing without the ad- 
vice or consent of a majority of the association." 

"In the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and thirty- 
four, an act to incorporate the Stroudwater Mill Dam Company" 
was approved, January 21st by the Governor of the State of Maine, 
with "power to purchase and hold real estate," and to-day the com- 
pany is in existence with a business office at Stroudwater. 

The year prior to this, the town of Westbrook at their annual 
town meeting, held September 9, 1833, took steps to ascertain the 
location of the town's lands by choosing a committee of investiga- 
tion, and at the March meeting of 1834, (v. 1, p. 346, clerk's record) 
the committee reported that "having advertised the place and time 
of sale, on the 28th day of Dec, 1833, did sell the town wharf so 
called with flats appertaining thereto, situate at Stroudwater, for the 
sum of 1347. OU." Subsequently the wharf and flats were sold to 
the Stroudwater Mill Dam Company and the older portion of the 
present mill located upon a portion of the old wharf. 

In the early days of our local history public Landings and "drift- 
ways" were a necessity, hence the one at Stroudwater. 

When the Neck was set of from Falmouth in 1787, it was provided 
in Sect. 4, of the Act of Incorporation, that the "public Landings 
shall be in common to the inhabitants of both towns," and as late 
as 1837 Portland placed the two Landings of that city upon its 
schedule of public property. 

The right to the use of flats between the old town wharf and the 
old Means wharf for the purpose of laying vessels, and for the pur- 
poses of navigation generally by the owners of the two wharves, is 
beyond question, but it is apparent that the public also have fights 
between these wharves, and that the flats as well as the land above 



56 TOWN LANDING. 

highwater inark from the center of the channel westerly between 
the wharves to the outside or easterly line of the highway leading 
over the long bridge at Stroudwater, thence to the Reform School 
farm is public property and cannot justly be claimed or legally 
held by any person. 

This is the only place where Fore river can be reached by the 
public without crossing private property. A careful examination of 
the assessors' records of both the towns of Westbrook and Deering 
show that no person has ever paid a tax on the premises. A quit- 
claim conveyance of this lot by heirs of original owners of adjacent 
property would not, it seems to us, give the holder of such a title, 
liberty to legally claim exclusive possession of the lot, and enter 
it upon assessors' books of the town for taxation by such claimants. 

The original of which the accompanying plan is a copy is recorded 
in Plan Book No. 7, page 9, Cumberland County Registry of Deeds. 



FIRE DEPARTMENT. 57 



Report of the Chief Engineer of the Fire Department. 



To the Honorable Selectmen of t/ie Town of Deering : 

Gentlemen : — I herewith submit the first annual report of the 
Fire Department of the town, for the year 1890, with such sugges- 
tions as I deem advisable. 

The department consists of eight hose companies, located as fol- 
lows : 

Hose Company No. 1, at Woodford's Corner. 

" " " 2, " Deering Centre. 

" " " 3, " Morrill's Corner. 

" " 4, " Allen's " 

" " " 5, " East Deering. 

" " " 6, " Stroudwater. 

" " " 7, " Libby's Corner. 

" " 8, " Lunt's 

The town's apparatus consists of six two wheeled hose carriages 
and two hose wagons, which are all in good repair. We own also 
3,950 feet of first-class hose, which should be increased 1,000 feet 
this year. There is also great need of ladders in the more thickly 
settled portions of the town, and I would recommend the purchase 
of at least two for each village. 

The only serious fire for the last year was the burning of the tan- 
nery at Morrill's Corner, and the department is to be praised, I 
think, for the creditable manner in which it was handled. 
Respectfully, 

C. H. LEIGHTON, Chief Engineer. 






Ancient Burying Grounds, 



To the Selectmen of the Town of Veering: 

The appropriation to keep in repair the so-called " Ancient Bury- 
ing Grounds" was one hundred dollars. In the expenditure of this 
amount I have obtained all I possibly could, charging nothing for 
my services, and I have spent considerable time in connection with 
the matter. 

I spent $22.25 in causing the grass and bushes to be cut in the 
five places and removed; the rest of the appropriation I spent on a 
fence around the Bailey ground. The fence at this place had gone 
to decay ; the old tall fence on the southerly side was very unsight- 
ly, which, by the consent of the owner of the adjoining property, I 
caused to be removed. The fence commenced was designed for 
posts, rails and wires. The posts used are large and good, upon 
which caps have been placed ; the rails are stout, and when both 
have been painted according to design, and the wires put in place, 
it will be a fence that will endure a great many years. 

When the town purchased the gravel lot at Allen's Corner of 
Mrs. Dorcas C. Knight, in 1873 — the deed not being recorded until 
1890, and may be found on p. 213, v. 560, in the office of Register 
of Deeds — one of the considerations was that the town "is to en- 
close the same with a suitable fence and keep said fence in good 
repair," a condition the town has never complied with. I here al- 
lude to this because the town gravel lot joins upon the burial lot a 
distance of " eight rods and nine links." When the frail fence was 
constructed around the burying ground the Selectmen were asked 
to comply with the requirements of the gravel lot purchase, but the 
deed could not then be found, so the fence now standing was put up 
and wholly paid for from the burying ground appropriation. Now 
that the deed has been re-obtained and recorded, I hope, in common 
with others, the dividing line between the gravel and burying lots 
will be permanently established, and gravel lot fenced, which will 
remove one of the evidences of slackness in our municipal govern- 



STREET SIGNS. 59 

ment, and make things far more sightly in this part of our town. 

To those who have manifested to me personally an interest in the 
care now bestowed upon these old resting places of the dead, and 
there are scores of them, I hereby return thanks. 

Very respectfully submitted, 

L. B. CHAPMAN. 



Report of the Committee on Street Signs. 



The Committee on Street Signs, which was continued from last 
year, with power, have attended to the duty assigned them, and re- 
port as follows, having placed signs on the streets as follows: 

Alder street, Bond street, Bedford street, Brighton street, Best 
street, Cedar street, Church street, Cherry street, Chestnut street, 
Congress street, Frost street, Johnson street, Liberty street, Leland 
street, Leonard street, Morse street, Morrill street, New street, Nev- 
ens street, Perkins street, Presumpscot street, Hay street, Riverside 
street, Richardson street, Summit street, Stevens Plains avenue 
Westbrook street, Waldo street, West street, Kidder street. 

Respectfully submitted. 

Per Order, J. N. READ, Chairman. 

Feb. 16, 1891. 



Intentions of iVIarriage Recorded during the 
year ending February 12th, 1891. 

. — Elias E. Elliott and Miss Emma E. Parsom, both of Deering. 
— John C. Bryant and Mrs. Tryphenia Sawyer, both of Deering. 
— Harry L. Gray, West Paris, Miss Emma E. Perry, of Deering, 
— Edward H. Godfrey, Boston, and Miss O. B Blackstone, of Deering. 
—Don C. Seilz, Brooklyn, ST. Y., Miss Mildred E. Blake, of Deering. 
— Thomas McCarthy, Deering, Miss Mary McDonougb, of Portland. 
. — Thomas Parody, Providence, Miss Louise G. Valente, of Deering. 
.—William H. Richardson, Worcester, Mass., and Miss Mary L. Huston, 
of Deering. 

— A. L Chapman and Miss Anna Furbush, both of Deering. 
— Owen Hughs, Portland, and Miss Tennie Benson, of Deering. 
— Fred Y. Matthews and Miss Anna B. Harmon, both of Deering. 
— B. F. Libby and Miss Ala May Torrey, both of Deering. 
—Herbert F. Hutching, Haverhill, and Miss Lucy Bennett, of Deering. 
— Frank L. Bowie, Portland, and Miss Rosa F. Kumery of Deering. 
—John Watson, of Deering, and Miss Ellen Nolan, of Portland. 
—Henry L. Hamilton and Miss Susie L. Robbins, both of Deering. 
— Benjamin E. Prince and Miss Florestine E. Cram, both of Deering. 
— Philip J. Bragdon, Boston, Mass., and Miss Grace M. Hall, of Deering. 
— J. R. Small, Westbrook, and Miss Silence McKenney, of Deering. 
— T. A. Johnson, Portland, and Miss Hilda Ek, of Deering. 

— J. C. McDonald, N. S., and Miss Margie A. Knowles, of Deering. 
—Joseph L. Dyer, Portland, and Miss Hattie V. Elder, of Deering. 
— H. C. Hawkes, AVindham, and Miss Lelia Cobb, of Deering. 

— S. C. Smith, and Miss Earnesiine Thomas, both of Deering. 
— Howard M. Br,een, Portland, and Miss Ada Knight, of Deering. 

— Albert Morton, and Miss Sutoe McDonald, both of Deering. 
—Charles Worthen, Knoxville, Tenn., and Miss LotLie D. Green, of 

Deering. 

— O. J. Durgin and Miss Mary A. Welch, both of Deering. 

— E. E. Ingalls, Portland, and Miss Gertrude E. Furlong, of Deering. 

—J. B. Bryant, China, Me., and Miss Flora A. Richardson of Deering. 

— W. H. Wentworth and Miss Adie L. Pride, both of Deering. 

—Geo. H. Hodgkius, Deering, and Miss Cicely De St. Croix, of Port- 
land. 

— Harmon Northrop Morse and Miss Elizabeth D. Clark, both of Deering. 

— E. M. Watkiu and Miss Eliza Thompson, both of Deering. 

— J. M. Studley and Miss Julia E. Jones, both of Deering. 

— H. P. Spurr, Otisfield, Me., and Miss Jennie Mussey, of Deering. 



1890. 


Mar. 


24. 




24. 




29. 


April 


2. 




9. 




11. 




21. 




22. 




24 




26. 


June 


2. 




2, 




3 




10. 




11. 




12. 




1(1 




17. 




2G. 


July 


2. 




12. 




18. 


Aug 


13. 


Sept. 


9.- 




24. 


Oct. 


7. 




9.- 




11. 




13. 




20. 


Nov. 


8.- 




24.- 


Dec. 


17- 




18.- 




24. 


1891. 


Jan. 


1. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 61 

3. — George W. Mitchell and Mis8 Ada M. Reed, both of Deering. 
12.— Charles L. Everitr, P. Q., and Miss Ella Norton, of Deering. 
19.— W. B. Bailey and Miss Hattie E. Kenney, both of Deering. 
24.— C. J. Wood, Deering, and Miss Lizzie M. Gibbin, Denville, Me. 
27. — C. R. Wendell and Miss Josephine Johnson, both of Deering. 
31. — A. H. Small and Miss Martha J. Bangs, both of Deering. 
Feb. 4. — Fred L. Harris and Jennie Brock, both of Deering. 

7. — John C. Bowdoin and Miss Mildred Doody, both of Deering> 

Attest: F. BURNELL, Clerk. 



Residents who have died during the year 
ending February 12, I89L 

1890. 
Feb. 15.— George Miller. 
Mar. 2. — Abigail McDonald, age 86 years, widow of James McDonald. 

8. — James H. Torrey, age 66 years. 

9. — Joseph S. Nutter, 8 months, 9 days. 

14.— Elizabeth Ann Frink, age 70 years. 

15. — Henry B. Shaw, age 44 years. 

15. — Lewis G. Hawkes, age 5 months. 

16. — Joseph Ross, age 75 years, 2 months. 

20 — Helen M. Scribner, age 41 years, 6 months, wife of H. G. Scribner. 

22.— C. Frank Bates, age 2 years, 9 months, son of C. S. Bates. 

22. — Hannah B. Bennett, age 79 years. 
April 1. — Sarah Grant. 

6. — Arthur C. McClennan, age 38 years, 8 months. 

13. — Fannie B. Fickett, age 80 years, 10 months. 

17. — William D. Boothby, age 71 years, 1 month, 4 days. 

18. — Olofif W. Frausing, age 4 years, 2 months. 

18.— Jessie L. Walton, age 3 years, son of J. L. Walton. 

20.— Joseph Coffee, age 11 years, 9 months, 21 days. 

20. — John Brown, age 77 years 2 months. 

27. — Elizabeth B. Thompson, age 66 years, wife of J. B. Thompson. 

29. — Nellie M. Means, age 24 years, 14 days, wife of Chas. G. Means. 
May 1.— Mary C. Sewell. 

7. — Charles R. Thompson, age 3 years, 3 months. 

13. — John E. Phinney, age 19 years, 7 months. 

23.— M. B. M. Reed, age 80 years, 3 months, 4 days, widow of late Thomas 
B. Reed. 

27. — Mary G. S. Lennon, age 39 years, wife of P. H. Lennon. 



62 RECORD OF DEATHS. 

28.— Richard Lennon, age 1 year, 1 month, 1 day, son of P. H. Lennon. 

28. — Mary Pennell, age 70 years. 
June 17. — Eliza Larrell, age 88 years, 13 days. 

25. — Edgar F. Randall, age 35 years, 3 months, 20 days. 

25.— Henry Hanson, age 3 years, 3 months, 10 days, son of E. M. Hanson. 

26.— Perley E. Russell, age 15 years, 4 months, 9 days, son of Stewart 
Russell. 
July 5.— Sarah B. Stevens, age 90 years, 9 months, widow of Saui'l B. Stevens. 

19. — Luke Moore, age 80 years, 6 months, 9 days. 

19. — E. M. Hanson, age 2 years, daughter of H. P. Hanson. 

21. — Edward Payson, age 76 years, 10 months. 

21.— E. H. Elwell, age 64 years, 7 months. 

30. — Mattie E. Mitchell, age 1 year, 11 months, S days, daughter of 
Charles H. Mitchell. 

31. — Comfort W. Knowles, age 71 years, 11 months, wife of J S. Knowles. 
Aug. 5. — Lucy A. Evans, age 55 years, 9 months. 

8.— William H. Adams, age 86 years, 6 months 
8. — Christian Bruns, age 3 months. 

18.— S. S. Knight, age 49 years. 

18. — Elizabeth A. Lowell, age 70 years. 

19.— Ellen Manley, age 59 years, 1 month. 

20. — Arthur W. Dyke, age 9 months, 20 days. 

27. — James Hartnett, age 60 years. 
Sept. 2.— Hannah H. Whitney, age 62 years, 2 months. 

12. — B. L. Blake, age 4 months, daughter of George W. Blake. 

15.— Edward F. Morgan, age 2 months, 4 days. 

16. — Catherine Plummer, age 85 years. 

26.— N. O. Douglass, age 76. 

28. — Mary N. Winslow, age 67 years, 3 months, wife of J. T. Winslow. 

30. — Lois M. Johnson, age 20 years, 3 months, daughter of Fred and 
Lucy Johnson. 
Oct. 2.— Sarah B. Knight, age 91 years, 9 months, widow of Jesse Knight. 
7.— Thomas McCafferty, age 67 years. 

24. — Harriet L. Hayes, age 58 years, 3 months, wife of William Hayes. 

25. — J. Frank Chenery, age 43 years. 

28. — Nellie C. Orne, age 15 years, 4 months. 

29.— William Gowen, age 57. 
Nov. 2.— Sarah B. Herty, age 64 years, widow of S. E. Herty. 
7. — Horace Parker, age 64 years, 5 months, 10 days. 

10.— John Haskell, age 78. 

24._Mamie E. West, age 21 years, 2 mouths. 

26.— Hannah F. Tyler. 
£> eCf 9.— Eliza C. Hooper Fuller. 

18.— Arthur Milliken, age 75 years, 1 month. 

22. — Brackett Sawyer, age 73 years, 3 months. 

26. — Margret Sparrow, age 77 years, wife of William Sparrow. 

29.— William Halke, age 83 years, 10 months. 



RECORD OF DEATHS. 63 

1891. 
Jan. 1. — Jennie J. Seeley, age 12 years, 3 montbs, daughter of Linus and 
Ellen B. Seeley. 
8. — Charles Stevens, age 70 years, 7 months. 
8. — Sally Morrill, age 88 years, widow of late Rufus Morrill. 
12.— Elizabeth W. Hall, age 84 years. 
17.— M. Malone, age 87. 

19. — George F. Loveitt, age 3 months, 17 days. 
Feb. 1. — Mary H. Franying, age 30 years, 7 months. 
2. — Margery Stone, age 83. , 

5. — Martha C. Miller, age 23 years, 1 month, 7 days. 

Attest: F. BURNELL, Clerk. 



Warrant for March Meeting, 1891. 

To Fred V. Matthews, Constable of Deering, in the 

County of Cumberland. 

greeting: 
In the name of the State of Maine, you are hereby re- 
quired to notify and warn the inhabitants of the said Town 
of Deering, qualified by law to vote in town affairs, to as- 
semble at the Town House in said town, on Monday, the 
second day of March, 1891, at nine o'clock in the fore- 
noon, to act on the following articles, to wit: 

Article 1. To choose a moderator to preside at said meet- 
ing. 

Art. 2. To choose all necessary town officers for the ensu- 
ing year. 

Art. 3. To see if the town will grant and raise such sums 
of money as may be necessary for the maintenance and support 
of schools, including the purchase of text books for the pupils 
as required by law, and the poor, and repairs of roads and 
bridges, and to defray all other town charges for the ensuing 
year. 

Art. 4. To hear and act upon the reports of the selectmen, 
treasurer, overseers of poor and superintending school committee, 
and other officers. 

Art. 5. To see what the town will allow per hour for the 
labor of men, horses and oxen on the highway. 

Art. 6. To see if the town will authorize the assessors to 
make such abatements as may be necessary. 

Art. 7. To see if the town will make a discount on taxes 
paid within a given time and charge interest thereafter. 

Art. 8. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen and 
treasurer to hire money temporarily for the use of the town in 
anticipation of taxes, provided the same shall be necessary. 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 65 

Art. 9. To see what action the town will take in regard to 
the pay of town officers. 

Art. 10. To see if the town will raise money for a Free 
High School, and how much. 

Art. 11. To see if the town will authorize the municipal 
officers to quit claim title to property held by the town under 
tax deeds, by payment of taxes, interest and charges by persons 
claiming to own said property. 

Art. 12. To see if the town will vote to tax dugs. 

Art. 13. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen to 
purchase material for repairs on roads and bridges. 

Art. 1\. To see what instruction the town will give the 
treasurer in relation to tax deeds. 

Art. 15. To see if the town will vote to raise ($300) three 
hundred dollars to sprinkle the street from Deering Bridge to 
Maine Central station at Woodfords. 

Art. 16. To see if the town will vote to accept and con- 
struct a public drain, or sewer, beginning at a point on William 
street one hundred feet easterly from Deering street, and run- 
ning through William and Forest Avenue, and connecting with 
the main on Forest Avenue as laid out by the. selectmen and 
raise money for the same. 

Art. 17. To see if the selectmen be authorized to sell sand, 
gravel and loam, to residents of the town of Deering, and not to 
sell to non-residents on any account whatever. 

Art. 18. To see if the town will vote to pay John S. Mat- 
thews and Harry W. Kimball ($25) twenty-five dollars ad- 
ditional for land damage in laying out West street. By re- 
quest of Carleton Kimball. 

Art. 19. To see if the town will vote to fix a time in which 
the taxes shall be payable*. 

Art. 20. To choose a committee to investigate and report 
upon the best method of keeping the highways in repair. 

Art. 21. To see if the town will vote to repair the clap- 
boards and paint the town house. 

Art. 22. To see if the town will vote to provide suitable 



66 WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 

rooms, with fire proof vault, by purchase of Lewis Hall, or the 
construction of a new building, for offices for the selectmen, 
collector of taxes, treasurer, and other town officials, and raise 
money for the same. 

Art. 23. To see if the town will vote to locate two hydrants 
on Main street, providing the Portland Water Co. will lay six 
inch pipe from Allen's Corner to Lunt's Corner, a distance of 
one and one-third miles. By request of H. F. Milliken. 

Art. 24. To see if the town will vote to place a hydrant on 
Prospect street near High street, and raise money for the same. 
By request of John T. Small. 

Art. 25. To see if the town will give the selectmen au- 
thority to abate new manufactories from taxes. 

Art. 26. To see if the town will vote to widen Rackleff 
street at east end, make it fifty feet, and raise money for same. 
Art. 27. To see if the town will vote to accept the con- 
tinuation of Wharf street, as dedicated by Geo. Libby. 

Art. 28. To see if the town will vote to blast out the ledge, 
opposite the residence of W. E. Watson, and raise money for the 
same. 

Art. 29. To see if the town will vote to finish and furnish 
the second story of the school house at Oakdale, and raise 
money for same. 

Art. 30. To see if the town will vote to abate J. P. Shat- 
tuck's taxes for the year 1890. 

Art. 31. To see if the town will authorize the selectmen to 
exchange or sell to J. N. Winslow a strip of land connected with 
the school house near Forest Avenue. 

Art. 32. To see if the town will rebuild the culverts near 
Hamblet's Brick Yard, and one near Wm. Lucas' Brick Yard, 
and raise money for the same. 

Art. 33. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Grant street, beginning 
at a point on Mechanic street and running northerly to Spring, 
near Nevens street, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 34. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 



WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 67 

laid out by the selectmen, to be called Davis street, beginning at 
a point on the southerly side of the county road leading through 
Libby's Corner, distant about 100 feet southeasterly from the 
school house lot and running southwesterly to the P. and O. R. 
R. location and raise money for the same. 

Art. 35. To see if the town will vote to raise money to pay 
bonds coming due this year. 

Art. 36. To see if the town will vote to locate a hydrant on 
Ocean street, near the residence of J. S. Knowles, and raise 
money for the same. 

Art. 37. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be the continuation of Chestnut 
street, running easterly across Deering street, distant about 500 
feet, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 38. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Linden street, running 
from Longfellow street, northerly, to the continuation of Chest- 
nut street, and raise money for the same. 

Art. 39. To see if the town will vote to accept a street as 
laid out by the selectmen, to be called Cottage street, beginning 
on the continuation of Chestnut street, about 197 feet from 
Deering street, and running southerly to Longfellow street, and 
raise money for same. 

Art 40. To see if the town will vote to instruct the proper 
town officials to acquire possession, in the name of the inhabi- 
tants of the town of Deering, and by virtue of tax deeds now 
held by the town, of all real estate bid in by the town, at sales 
for delinquent taxes, providing the time of redemption fixed by 
law on such deeds has expired. 

Art. 41. To hear and act on the report of the selectmen in 
relation to Art. 60 of last Warrant, referred to the board of se- 
lectmen. 

Art. 42. To see if the town will vote to bond $20,000 of 
the tempoary loan. 

Art. 43. To see what action the town will take in regard to 
its road bounds where lost. 



68 WARRANT FOR MARCH MEETING. 

Art. 44. To see if the town will vote to blast out the ledge 
on Veranda street, near Martin Point bridge, and raise money 
for the same. 

Art. 45. To see if the town will adopt by-laws that were 
submitted to the town, at the last annual meeting, by I. L. El- 
der and others. 

Art. 46. To see if the town will vote to pay the fire com- 
panies $50 per company, as voted at last annual meeting, and 
raise $ 350.00 for the same. 

Art. 47. To see if the town will vote to purchase 1,000 feet 
of hose for Woodfords' engine house, and raise money for the 
same. 

Art. 48. To see what time in March, the town will vote to 
hold their next annual meeting. 

The selectmen will be in session at their office on Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday, the twenty-sixth, twenty-seventh and 
twenty-eighth days of February, A. D. 1891, to receive the appli- 
cation of persons claiming the right to vote, and for revising and 
correcting the voting list. 

Given under our hands this nineteenth day of February, A. 
D. 1891. 

Lemuel W. Dyer, 
Elbridge G. Johnsdn, George H. Crocker, 
John H. Blake, Adam W. Wilson, 

Gilman G. Lane, Isaac F. Clark, 

Selectmen of Deering.